Middlesex County, New Jersey
Biographies

1664-1920
 

FREDERICK CONRAD SCHNEIDER.—About forty years ago the Schneider family returned to New Brunswick after an absence of a few years spent in the State of Kansas. The father of this family, George Schneider, and the mother, Babetta (Keidel) Schneider, were both natives of Germany. After arriving in this country, they settled in New Brunswick, New Jersey, where Mr. Schneider conducted a shoe store for some time, but gave it up when the family went to Kansas. When he returned, he again entered the shoe business and now has a flourishing trade at No. 52 Easton avenue.. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider are the parents of nine children, all living at the present time but one, a son John. The others are: Charles, Anna, George, Frederick Conrad, of whom further ; Edward ; Elizabeth, the wife of Dr. Morris Farkas, of Orange, New Jersey; Laura, who married Garrett Himmler ; and Lillian. All but Mrs. Farkas reside in New Brunswick, three of the daughters, Anna, Laura and Lillian, being school teachers in that city.

Frederick Conrad Schneider, fourth child of George and Babetta (Keidel) Schneider, was born in Phillipsburg, Phillips county, Kansas, December II, 1879, but his stay there was very short, as he was a mere baby when taken to New Brunswick. His education was acquired in the public school and in the high school, he graduating from the latter in 1899. In the same year Mr. Schneider entered Rutgers College, New Brunswick, taking the civil engineering course of four years, he graduated from this college in i9o3, receiving the degree of B. S.

At this time the Pennsylvania Railroad was engaged in the work of elevating their roadbed running through the city of New Brunswick, and Mr. Schneider entered the employ of this company in the engineering and constructing department; this was in 1903 and the young man remained with them until 1905, when he became instructor in surveying and mathematics in Trinity College, Durham, North Carolina. In the same year Mr. Schneider received the appointment of city engineer of New Brunswick, retaining this position until 1912.

Having had so much experience in constructional work, and realizing the opportunities for success in that line, Mr. Schneider entered into the building and contracting business in 1912, and the result being entirely satisfactory, he is still carrying on the enterprise. His principal work is the construction of roads, and he has done a large amount of road work on the State highways, his largest contract being one which amounted to $335,000. He also built the roads at Camp Dix for the government, and did considerable work in Delaware for the DuPonts. The business is now carried on under the corporate name of the Utility Construction Company, Incorporated, in 1915, successors to Schneider 8i Steele. Mr. Schneider is president of the corporation; Otto R. Voelker, vice-president; and Mr. Steele, secretary and treasurer. They give employment to some one hundred and seventy-five •en, and their contracts for 1920 totaled about $600,000.

Meanwhile, Mr. Schneider became interested in politics in his city, and in 1917 was elected an assemblyman from his district, his term of office expiring in 1918. He was reelected the following year, serving as chairman of the highway committee the second year. He served on various committees, and was an active factor both terms he served. He was then made State committeeman from Middlesex county, being. reelected in 1919 for a period of three years (1919-22). Mr. Schneider is connected with several organizations in New Brunswick, among them the local lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, and Lodge No. 324, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His clubs are the Craftsmen's and New Brunswick. He and his family are members of the Baptist church of New Brunswick.

On February 3, 1908, Frederick Conrad Schneider was married to Ethel May Smalley, the ceremony taking place in New Brunswick, which was also her birthplace. She is the daughter of William and Emily (Lenox) Smalley, both born in New Brunswick, where they have lived all their lives and where their home is now located on a farm in the outskirts of the city. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Schneider have two children, both living: Dorothea Ethel, born December 5, igo9; and Frederick C., Jr., born January 12, 1913.
 

JOHN JOSEPH CLARK is one of the prominent men in the business and public life of Perth Amboy, New Jersey. His father, John Joseph Clark, was born in Ireland. While in that country he engaged in farming, but later he removed to Scotland and became an inspector in the sanitary department of the city of Dundee, Scotland. He married Helen Brady, who was born in Ireland, and they were the parents of eight children, of whom Thomas P., of Short Hills, New Jersey, and John Joseph, of Perth Amboy, are the only ones now living. John J. Clark, Sr., died in Dundee, Scotland, at the age of forty-five years, and his wife survived him for many years, coming to this country and residing in Perth Amboy, where she died in 1902, at the age of sixty-seven years.

John Joseph Clark was born in Dundee, Scotland, September 15, 1864. He received his education in the Board or Government schools of that city, leaving school at the age of fourteen to go to work as a locksmith and bell hanger. This work he found less congenial than might be desired, and when opportunity offered he entered the linen industry in Dundee. The dash and spirit which he inherited from his Irish ancestry, balanced by the sound common sense of his Scotch training, was a factor in his career, but the young man knew that his success in life depended entirely on himself. So he forthwith took it into his own hands, and at the age of eighteen came to America. He located at once in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, becoming identified with the terra cotta industry. He has been continuously engaged along this line ever since with the exception of a period about 1890, when he was in the service of the United States army, on the Northwestern Frontier. . Mr. Clark has long since established himself in the confidence of his fellow-townsmen, and has been called upon to bear an important share in the city government. He is alderman from the Fifth Ward, which office he has held since 1913, his business ability and excellent judgment making his a sane and forceful influence in the deliberations of the board. He is connected with several fraternal orders, being a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Army and Navy Union, and of the Foresters of America.

Mr. Clark married (first) September 6, i89t, Anna Pullen, daughter of James and Anna (Carroll) Pullen. Mrs. Clark was born in Ireland, and came to America at the age of ten years. Her father died in Ireland, and her mother in Glasgow, Scotland. John Joseph and Anna (Pullen) Clark were the parents of one child, John Carroll, who is now an insurance adjuster and broker at No. 49 Wall street, New York City. The first Mrs. Clark died August 26, 19o5. On August 2, 1907, Mr. Clark married (second) Rose M. Kilmurray. The family have always been members of the Roman Catholic church.
 

GROVER TAYLOR APPLEGATE, M. D.—The Applegate family, represented in Middlesex county, New Jersey, by Dr. Grover Taylor Applegate, of New Brunswick, descends from Bartholomew Applegate, who in 1674 applied for permission to purchase land from Indian chiefs at Middletown, near the Navesinks. The patent granted him called for land located on Raritan bay, at what is yet known as Applegate's Landing. The members of the family have always held honored position in community life, ranking as substantial agriculturists and business men eminent in the professions. Grover T. Applegate is a son of Grover T., grandson of John, and great-grandson of Richard Applegate, a descendant of Thomas Applegate, one of the patentees of Flushing, Long Island, in 1647, who came from Weymouth, Massachusetts, where he settled about 1633.

Grover T. Applegate, father of Grover Taylor Applegate, was born at Applegate's Landing, New Jersey, and died at Red Bank, New Jersey, January 5, 1890. He married Margaret Herbert, born in Middletown, New Jersey, who died in October, 1908, aged seventy-seven. They were the parents of six children, as follows : John, now a resident of Brooklyn, New York; Daniel, deceased; Emily, residing in Red Bank. New Jersey ; Grover Taylor, of further mention ; Herbert, of Brooklyn, New York ; and Richard, deceased.

Grover Taylor Applegate, son of Grover T. and Margaret (Herbert) Applegate, was born at Red Bank, New Jersey, April 5, 1859, and spent the first sixteen years of his life at the home farm and in acquiring an education. He then taught school for one year in the home district, then was in charge of the public school at Holmdel, New Jersey, for two years. He decided upon a profession and entered Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago, Illinois, receiving his M. D. from that institution with the graduating class of 1883. He practiced in Chicago until February, 1884, when he came to New Brunswick, where he has since practiced continuously until the present, i9ao, specializing in chronic diseases. He has won high standing in the profession and has pined public confidence and respect through his professional skill and his manly attributes of character. During the World War he was a member of the Medical Advisory Board, and for a long time was president of the Provident Building and Loan Association. Dr. Applegate belongs to the Masonic order, being a member of Palestine Lodge, No. III, Free and Accepted Masons; Scott Chapter, No. 3, Royal Arch Masons; Temple Commandery, No. 18, Knights Templar ; Mecca Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of New York. City.

He is a member of the State Medical Society, is State supervising medical examiner of the Royal Arcanum, and was supreme councillor of the Loyal Association from 1903 to 1906. He is a member and ex-president of the New Jersey State Homeopathic Medical Society, and a fellow of same; member of the American Institute of Homoeopathy and of the senate of same; member of the Middlesex Medical Society; member of the New Jersey State Medical Society; and fellow of the American Medical Association. He has contributed extensively to the medical journals, etc. Dr. Applegate is also a member of several social organizations, especially clubs devoted to his favorite recreation, whist. He was a charter member of the Union Club of New Brunswick, of. which he is president. For eighteen years he has been an elder of the Suydam Street Reformed Church and he has a deep interest in the welfare of that organization.

As a citizen, Dr. Applegate has taken an active part in public affairs, having been twice a candidate for mayor of New Brunswick on the Democratic ticket. He was also a member and president of the board of water commissioners, having held that office for four years. In 1887 he was a member of the Board of Education, serving for two years. He has given freely of his time and his ability to the cause of the public good, and is an ardent apostle of the gospel of prevention of disease by sanitary precaution, pure water and right living. His acquaintance is large, and to know him well is to admire and esteem him.

Dr. Applegate married, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, October 25, 1888, Sarah Mundy, born on Long Island, New York. They have no children.
 

HAROLD RICHARD SEGOINE, although young, in years, has already made a name for himself as an executant which might well be the envy of a much older man. He was born October 14, 1887, at Point Pleasant Beach, New Jersey, the son of William and Frances (Conover) Segoine. His father, William Segoine, was a civil engineer and surveyor, and for several years was county engineer of Ocean county, New Jersey. The elder man had also been mayor of Point Pleasant Beach, and ever took a keen and active interest in the affairs of the community, his relations to the public having always been an influential factor in support of advancement and improvement. He died April 5, 1919. He was a member of the East Jersey Proprietors, and was deputy surveyor of East Jersey; was also engineer for the Riparian Commission, and did much work along the east coast of New Jersey. The Conover family were of Revolutionary stock, the great-grandfather of Harold R. Segoine, Lewis Cowenhoven (later Conover), served under General Washington in the battle of Monmouth as sergeant.

As a boy, Harold Richard Segoine went through the public schools of his native place, taking also the full course at the Freehold . High School, and was graduated in 1904. Having in the meantime decided upon civil engineering as a profession, he matriculated in Rutgers College and four years later received from that institution the degree of Bachelor of Science, subsequently identifying himself with George E. Jenkins, a civil and mining engineer at Dover, New Jersey. Here Mr. Segoine remained until 1920, when he secured a position as assistant to the president of the Livingston Manor Corporation, realty developers, with which concern he was identified until 1914, when he resigned to accept the presidency of the Highland Park Building Company and the Highland Park Lumber Company, in which he has continued up to the present time, 1921. In 1918, Mr. Segoine was elected president of the Cronk Manufacturing Company, woodworkers and box manufacturers, in which capacity he is still active. As a business man he is held in the highest esteem, it being his high sense of honor and his ability, as displayed in the conduct of his business affairs, which has given him his standing in the city. Mr. Segoine operates the old homestead farm, near Freehold, New Jersey, which has been in the possession of the family for four generations.

From 1910 until 1914, he was borough engineer for Highland Park, and has ever been highly popular both as an official and a civilian. From 1917 to 1918, Mr. Segoine served his country with the rank of captain of Company B, New Jersey Reserves. He affiliates with the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, Rutgers Chapter Delta Upsilon, and with the First Reformed Church of New Brunswick. His clubs are the Rotary and Rutgers of New Brunswick.

On April 3o, 1912, Harold Richard Segoine was united in marriage with Margaret Elizabeth Suydam, daughter of Peter Hoagland and Phoebe (Combs) Suydam, of New Brunswick. Mr. and Mrs. Segoine are the parents of four children: Margaret Elizabeth, born August to, 1913; Ruth Suydam, born July II, 1914; Frances C., born March 14, 1916; Harold Richard, born September 28, 1918.
 

J. MILTON PREGER, one of the many bright young lawyers to be found in New Brunswick, whose office is located at No. 360 George street, has been a resident of the city for five years, but for a portion of that time he was absent, serving his country on the battlefields of Prance. He was attached to the 311th Ambulance Company, 303rd Sanitary Train, 78th Division, taking his part in the World War on the firing line. Mr. Preger was at the battle of St. Mihiel from September 12 to October 2, 1918, and the Meuse-Argonne front from October 5 to Is, 1918. The best description of his part in the midst of shell fire is to quote from the official history of the 311th Ambulance Company: !Wilton Preger, lawyer and company clerk, was a good runner while at Veiville and was the first man, as a runner, to go to the shell-ridden stone quarry—the worst place of them all. He was game all through and stuck it out till we got out of the lines. Was worn out so was sent to the hospital to recover and never came back."

Born in Blossburg, Pennsylvania, January 12, 1887, J. Milton Preger was the son of Louis and Sarah (Goodman) Preger. Louis Preger is a clothing merchant, located at No. 140 West Front street, Plainfield, New Jersey, having been in business there for many years. There are seven children in the family, all now living. During the early boyhood of the son, J. Milton, he attended the public schools of his birthplace, but his parents moved to New York City when he was thirteen years of age, and the boy continued his education at Public School No. 19 in New York City. After finishing the prescribed course there, the youth entered the De Witt Clinton High School, from which he graduated in June, 19o7. J. Milton Preger immediately enrolled at the Law School of New York University, graduating in 1909 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 1910 he was admitted to the bar of the State of New York, and five years later, in March, I915, he was admitted to the bar of New Jersey and has been in practice in New Brunswick ever since, except for the period of service in the army.

Mr. Preger is a Democrat in politics, being a candidate for member of the General Assembly from Middlesex county on 'the Democratic ticket at the election of 192o. He is a member of the local lodge, No. 324, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Improved Order of Red Men, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, the Young Men's Christian Association, Charles Henry Post of the American Legion, and the Middlesex County Bar Association. Mr. Preger is a member of the Masonic order, affiliating with Union Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons. He attends the Jewish Temple of New Brunswick.

In his boyhood days and during his high school career Mr. Preger was very fond of all athletic sports, playing on the Midget football team at De Witt Clinton High School. He is still enthusiastic in the matter of swimming, an exercise in which he frequently indulges.
 

EUGENE MASON CLARK.—Emigration to America of members of the Clark family began early in the colonization period of our history, and from the earliest record of any of the name the various branches have produced men of sterling worth, who have rendered service in our Republic in the various walks of life, respected and honored citizens. The branch to which Eugene Mason Clark belongs have lived for many years in Rahway, New Jersey.

William Terrill Clark, father of Eugene Mason Clark, was born in Rahway, and died in Woodbridge. He learned the trade of wheelwright and cabinet maker when a young man and followed these occupations throughout his entire lifetime. He married Elizabeth Mason, a native of Jersey City; she died in Rahway. To Mr. and Mrs. Clark were born three children: William Henry, freight agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad in Philadelphia; Eugene Mason, mentioned below; Sarah, widow of Vernon Steele.

Eugene Mason Clark was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, November 23, 1876. He moved with his parents to Woodbridge when he was very young, obtaining his education in the schools of the latter place. At the age of sixteen he entered upon his business career, securing a position as clerk in the office of the Salamander Brick Works, at the same time attending Woods Business College, from which he was graduated, and then was made the New York salesman for these works. Later he was made assistant superintendent of the Southern Clay Product Company at Buena Vista, Virginia, and was with this concern two years when he left to take charge of the office of the National Fireproofing Company at Lorillard, New Jersey. One year later he secured a position as bookkeeper in the First National Bank of Perth Amboy, and in 1906, when the First National Bank of Roosevelt was organized at Chrome, Mr. Clark accepted his present position as cashier. He is a Republican in political belief, and at one time finished an unexpired term as park commissioner of Perth Amboy. He fraternizes with the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, and Raritan Lodge, No. 61, Free and Accepted Masons, of Perth Amboy. He was elected secretary and treasurer of Group No. I, New Jersey Bankers' Association. In religious belief Mr. Clark is a Methodist.

On September 1902, Mr. Clark was united in marriage with Matilda Christine Brown, daughter of Rasmus and Christine (Freder- icks) Brown, of Perth Amboy. Mr. and Mrs. Clark are the parents of one child, Howard Eugene, born May 25, 1911.
 

DAVID JOHN KAUFMANN, widely known among Perth Amboy business men, who for the past eighteen years has been actively identified with the business life of the city, as president and treasurer of the firm of Potts & Kaufmann, Incorporated, wholesale grocers and flour merchants, stands today prominently linked with the city's business interests.

Israel Kaufmann, father of David John Kaufmann, was born in Germany, in 1836, and emigrated to America in 1848, locating in New York, where he later became engaged in the wool business on West 'Forty-seventh street, and where he died in 1902 at the age of sixty-six years. He married Lena Kaufmann, a native of New York City, and they were the parents of four children: David John, of further mention; Abraham, engaged in the grocery business in Prenso, California, married, and has one child, Isabella; Isabella, widow of Henry Litchenstein, who has a daughter, Lena; Aaron, died at birth. Mrs. Kaufmann died in 1869, at the age of twenty-one years, when her fourth child was born,

David John Kaufmann, son of Israel and Lena (Kaufmann) Kaufmann, was born July 21, 1865, in New York City. He was educated in the public schools of New York City, and New York College, from which he was graduated in 1883. He was first employed by Bissell & Haydock, hardware dealers, accepting the position of cashier, and after a year and a 'half became a grocery salesman, travelling from Omaha to San Francisco, subsequently accepting the position of salesman for L. F. Hersh Brothers, wholesale grocers, of Elizabeth, New Jersey, remaining with this latter concern for fifteen years. In 1902, desiring to establish himself in business, he opened a small establishment on the corner of State and Fayette Streets, Perth Amboy, and the firm of Potts & Kaufmann, Incorporated, wholesale grocers and flour merchants, at Nos. 224-226 Washington street, Perth Amboy, employing fifty-five people and doing an annual business of $2,500,000, is the outgrowth of that little enterprise, Mr. Kaufmann being president and treasurer of this extensive business. More than to any other one man this enterprise owes its magnitude and prestige to its president, whose foresight, breadth of
view and capacity for prompt decision may be termed the cornerstone of this flourishing business.

Mr. Kaufmann carries with him the suggestion of intense vitality and alertness, and the briefest talk with him reveals his ability and his rare gift for managing a large enterprise. He is a man who while great in action is no less so in thought. His magnitude in execution is equalled by his breadth of outlook. He sees on the horizon the possibilities of the future and with all his strength he labors for their realization. In politics he is a Republican, but while never consenting to hold office he always gives his loyal support to measures calculated to benefit the community and promote its rapid and substantial development. Mr. Kaufmann's hobby is reading, he being particularly interested in ancient history. We have not said that Mr. Kaufmann is a good citizen for that fact is self-evident. as he is steadily and efficiently ministering to the advancement of his community.
 

EDWIN IRVING CRONE., M. D., began the practice of medicine in New Brunswick, New Jersey, a city in which he was born and where his forty-five years have been spent. He is a son of Lyman and Anna Cronk, his father a veteran of the Civil War, 1861-65, and a veteran New Brunswick manufacturer of sash, blinds and doors, now retired.

Edwin Irving Cronk was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, November 3o, 1876. He passed through all grades of the public schools, finishing with high school graduation, class of 1895. He prepared for the practice of medicine in Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was graduated M. D., class of 1900, and in the same year began the practice of his profession in New Brunswick. From 1900 to 1910 he was city physician, 1910 to 1921 health officer, and during the same period medical inspector of public schools. During the selective draft period, 1917-18, he was medical director of Draft Board No. 1 for Middlesex county. Dr. Cronk is a member of Union Lodge, No. 19, Free and Accepted Masons; the Fraternal Order of Eagles; Loyal Order of Moose; and the Royal Arcanum. His clubs are the New Brunswick, City and Lion's, all of New Brunswick. In politics he is a Republican; in religious faith affiliated with Pitman Methodist Church.

Dr. Cronk marred, in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 7, 1905, Mary L. Ellis. Dr. and Mrs. Cronk are the parents of two children : Madeline Clayton, born December is, 1906; Ellis Irving, born February 9, 1910.
 

DAVID THEODORE WILENTZ, one of the large group of professional men in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, is a prominent figure. Still a young man, and only recently established in his profession as attorney-at-law, he is commanding the attention' of the general public as well as his colleagues of the bar.

Mr. Wilentz is a son of Nathan and Bertha (Crane) Wilentz, who were both born in Russia. Nathan Wilentz is a well known man in the business world of Perth Amboy, having been in the wholesale tobacco business here for about thirty-five years. Nathan and Bertha (Crane) Wilentz are the parents of seven children: Jennie, now Mrs. Snaper, of Perth Amboy, New Jersey; Fannie, now Mrs. Miller, of Cleveland, Ohio; Frank, of Perth Amboy, New Jersey; Kate B., now Mrs. Kanter, of Newark, New Jersey; William, of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, a student in Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia; Ada, a student in Montclair. New Jersey, lives at home; and David Theodore, of further mention.

David Theodore Wilentz was born in Russia, December 21, 1894. He came with his family to America while yet a child, and received his early education in the public and high schools of Perth Amboy, being graduated from the latter in 1912. Choosing a legal career, he entered the New York Law School and was graduated in 1917. For two periods of one year and a half each, Mr. Wilentz was in newspaper work as reporter, first on the Perth Amboy "Evening News," then later on the Plainfield, New Jersey, "Courier-News."
During the recent World War, Mr. Wilentz bore his share in the service of the United States Army. From October, 1917, to October, 1918, he served in the Quartermaster's Corps, at Fort DuPont, Delaware, and from October, 1918, to December, 1918, in the Officers' Training School at Camp Joseph E. Johnston. Since his discharge he has followed the practice of law, which was interrupted so soon after his graduation. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

Mr. Wilentz married, February 22, 192o, in Perth Amboy, Lena Goldman, daughter of Barnett and Sarah (Diamond) Goldman. Mr. and Mrs. Wilentz are members of the Jewish church.
 

HERBERT JAMES LONG.—Progressive in business, and with a thorough understanding of his particular line of work, Herbert James Long has made the name of the "Kompak Water Heater" well known throughout the United States and, because of a large export trade, almost equally so in other countries.

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, September 21, 1878, Herbert James Long was the son of Albert and Etta (Wilbur) Long, lifelong residents of Cleveland, both having been born there. Albert Long, who  was an accountant in the city, died in 1879, and his wife, surviving him for many years, died at her home in Cleveland, at the age of fifty-two. They were the parents of four children : 1. Myron, deceased. William J., who resides in New York City. 3. Mabel, the wife of C. S. Beardslee, of Cleveland. 4. Herbert James, of whom further.

The Long family is of English ancestry, the grandfather of Herbert James Long coming to the United States from England many years ago and going at once to Cleveland, establishing his home there. On the maternal side, Mr. Long is a descendant of the well known Wilbur family, one of the oldest in Cleveland, the Wilbur homestead being one of the show places in the city.

Having attended the grammer school and graduated from the Central High School in 1896, Herbert James Long took a course in civil engineering at ,the Case School of Applied Science. He then received the appointment of civil engineer for the city of Cleveland, a position he held for four years. Following this he went into the plumbing business, and later became secretary and treasurer of the Monarch Water Heater Company of Pittsburgh, remaining with this concern for four years. In i9o7 Mr. Long came to New Brunswick to accept the position of secretary and treasurer of the Empire Foundry Company, and at the end of two years he left this company to enter into business for himself, starting in 1909 in the manufacture of water heaters, under the name of H. J. Long. Later it became known as the Long, Landreth & Schneider Company, manufacturers of water heaters, the factory being located at No. 226 Cleveland avenue, Highland Park. Eleven years after its founding, on January I, 1920, the concern became incorporated under the laws of New Jersey, the corporation name being the Kompak Company, this being the trade mark of their chief product, the "Kompak Water Heater." The business has prospered to an unusual extent, the last year (192o) it having tripled the amount of the previous year, in 1919 the business amounting to $200,000, and in 1920, $600,000.

Mr. Long is connected with several of the local organizations, among them being: The Rotary Club, the Young Men's Christian Association, and the American Gas Association. He and his family are members of the Livingston Avenue Baptist Church of New Brunswick. Mr. Long is greatly interested in automobiling, that being his favorite form of amusement.

In Cleveland, Ohio, September /, 194, Herbert James Long was married to Emilie S. Hessenmueller, a native of Cleveland. She was the daughter of Otto Hessenmueller, who is deputy county treasurer, his home being in Cleveland. Mr. and Mrs. Long have three children, all living: Gertrude E., born August 15, 19o5: Karl H., born October 6, 1907; and John W., born October 6, 1909. Their home is at No. 235 Harrison avenue, Highland Park, New Brunswick.
 

GEORGE R. MORRISON—Although young in years, George R. Morrison, a well known attorney of New Brunswick, New Jersey, has already earned a distinction in his professional work, for his efforts have been so discerningly directed along well-defined lines that his life already may be called a successful one.

James A. Morrison, father of George R. Morrison, was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and for a number of years was connected with the Morrison & Blue Printing Company, but of late years has given his attention to promoting business enterprises. A Republican in politics, he has always taken an active interest in the affairs of the organization having been city clerk and State committeeman for the party during 1918. He has also served as president of the New Brunswick Board of Education and the Board of Health. Mr. Morrison married Rebecca H. J. McCowan, a native of Scotland. To Mr. and Mrs. Morrison have been born four children : Lillian L., wife of Raymond P. Wilson, of New Brunswick; Helen J., a school teacher; Jessie L., a school teacher; and George R., of further mention.

iGeorge R. Morrison was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, June 27, 1893, and received his elementary education in the public schools of his native place, after which he entered Rutgers Preparatory School, from which he was graduated in 1910, and then matriculated at Rutgers College, where he spent two years. For the next six months he became associated with the New Brunswick Fire Insurance Company and then, having decided to enter the legal profession, he studied in the office of Judge Woodbridge and subsequently entered the New Jersey Law School, graduating from this institution in 1917, and being admitted to the bar the following year, he has since been engaged in the active practice of his profession in his native city.

Mr. Morrison is a Republican in politics. He affiliates with the Chi Phi fraternity of Rutgers College; the Delta Theta Phi law fraternity; Palestine Lodge, No. I, Free and Accepted Masons; and New Brunswick Lodge, No. 324, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.
 

DONALD WELLS REED.—From Ashtabula, Ohio, came Donald W. Reed, in January, 1910, and, as superintendent of the Eastern Coal Dock Company at South Amboy, he has taken a leading place among the men of his city. To him is due in large degree the founding and successful reception of the newest of the financial institutions of the county, the South Amboy Trust Company. In Ashtabula, Ohio, his birthplace, the family is well known through the connection of James Reed, Sr., and James Reed, Jr., with the Ashtabula "Telegraph," the elder Reed its founder, and the younger Reed its editor and owner all his mature years.

James (2) Reed was born in Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1852, died in Ashtabula, Ohio, in July, 1912. He was of ancient Colonial family, the Reeds having settled in and around Norwalk upon the coming of the founder from Scotland, in 1626. James (a) Reed married Harriet Cordelia Wells, of distinguished Connecticut family, who survives him, a resident of Ashtabula. Five children were born to them : Emma Louise, James, Donald Wells, of further mention; Catherine Elizabeth, and Frances Margaret.

Donald Wells Reed was born in Ashtabula, Ohio, April 23, 0382, and until the age of seventeen attended public schools. He began his business career with M. A. Hanna & Company, iron ore and coal shippers, and for ten years was in the employ of that company, rising to responsible position. In January, 1910, he entered upon the duties of a new office, superintendent of the Eastern Coal Dock Company, of South Amboy, and there he has spent the past ten years. He ably fills the duties of his office and has won the abundant goodwill of those associated with him of either higher, lower or equal rank. When the South Amboy Trust Company was organized, and on July I, 1919, opened for business, Donald W. Reed was made its first president and a director of same. The company has had a prosperous first year and shows wise, conservative management.

Mr. Reed is a Republican in politics; a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, and a member of the Masonic order, affiliating with
St. Stephen's Lodge, No. 63, of South Amboy, and Amboy Chapter, No. 4, Royal Arch Masons. His clubs are: The South Amboy Yacht, Middlesex Country, and the East Jersey. In 1918 he was enrolled with the local military company of reserves and took an active part in the various forms of war work during the World War. He is an enthusiastic motorist and makes that his principal form of recreation.

Mr. Reed married in Ashtabula, Ohio, September 6, 1905, Helen Marie Kelley, born in that city, daughter of Dr. David Edward and Nellie (Moore) Kelley, the latter deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Reed are the` parents of two children : Donald Wells (2), born February 21, 1907; and Claire Louise, born November 21, 1910.
 

BENJAMIN GUTMANN, M. D.—Any history of the medical profession of Middlesex county would be incomplete without the name of Dr. Benjamin Gutmann, whose career as a physician has been consistently devoted to the welfare of his fellow-citizens of New Brunswick, New Jersey, with a success achieved by but few.

Jacob Gutmann, father of Dr. Gutmann, was born in Baden, Germany. In 1855 he set out from Germany in a small sailing vessel, and upon his arrival in this country settled in South Amboy, New Jersey, where he established himself in the dry goods business, being a pioneer in that particular line of trade. He married Sophia Edwards Thompson, a native of Prospect Plains, New Jersey, and to them were born three children, Benjamin Gutmann being their only surviving child. Mr. and Mrs. Gutmann are both deceased, the former having passed away in 1881, the latter in 1902.

Dr. Benjamin Gutmann was born in South Amboy, New Jersey, December 29, 1877, and received the preliminary portion of his education in the schools of his native place. He then entered Glenwood Collegiate Institute, Mats wan, New Jersey, from which he was graduated in 1893. In the meantime, however, his attention was turned forcibly to the profession of medicine awl he decided to make it his life career. With this end in view, he matriculated at Jefferson Medical College, from which he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1897, during which time he devoted two years to 'the out-patient surgical service. Immediately after graduation, he came to New Brunswick, New Jersey, where he began practice and here continued uninterruptedly for thirteen years, when, in 1913, 1w took post-graduate study in medicine at Vienna and Berlin, Germany, later resuming his practice at New Brunswick. In 1919 Dr. Gutmann received a certificate from Harvard Graduate School of Medicine. By reason of taste and natural aptitude, he directs his entire attention to internal diseases, and is in possession of a large and increasing clientele,

Dr. Gutmann is a member of the American Medical Association, New Jersey State Medical Society, Middlesex County Medical Society, medical section of the Rutgers Club, Society of Surgeons of New Jersey, Anglo-American Society of Berlin, American Association of Vienna, and the Academy of Medicine of Northern New Jersey. He is a member of the Dutch Reformed Church of New Brunswick.

On November 15, 1904, Dr. Gutmann was united in marriage with Marie Louise Fisher, daughter of Charles and Ella (De Hart) Fisher. Dr. and Mrs. Gutmann are the parents of four children : Margaret, Elizabeth, Anna, and Jane. Dr. Gutmann combines with his professional activities those of a public-spirited citizen, associating himself intimately with the leading interests of the community which he has chosen for his home.
 

DAVID SERVISS.—The name 'of Serviss has long been an honored one in Middlesex county, and is one well known far beyond the home township, for a sheriff of the county bore the name, and his son, David Serviss, has held county office. South River is the home district in this branch, and there David Serviss, president of the First National Bank of the borough, has spent his life and there is most highly regarded.

David Serviss was born in South River, Middlesex county, New Jersey, June 2, 1851, son of Richard and Esther (Messier) Serviss. Richard Serviss was also born in Middlesex county, was a prosperous farmer, and gave much time to the public service. He was sheriff of the county, also county collector, and held other offices conferred upon him by his townsmen.

David Serviss was educated in the public school of Dunham's Corner, a private school in Old Bridge, New Jersey, and in Claverack College, Claverack, New York. After completing his own studies he began teaching, filling positions in the schools in Millbridge, Rahway Neck and Deans, Middlesex county, New Jersey. Later he studied surveying, mastered conveyancing and the detail of the fire insurance, and was quite successful. In 1902 he, with others, organized the First National Bank of South River, and has been president of that bank until the present (1921). Mr. Serviss is a Democrat in politics, and for twenty-five years was clerk of East Brunswick township. For ten years he was county collector, member of Board of Sinking Fund Commissioners of the borough of South River for several years, and is the present treasurer of the commission. He is a member of Union Lodge, No. 19, Free and Accepted Masons, New Brunswick; and attends South River Methodist Episcopal Church.

Mr. Serviss married, in Brooklyn, New York, October 6, 1886, Mary Throckmorton, who died October, 1917, daughter of Charles and Rebecca (Martin) Throckmorton. To Mr. and Mrs. Serviss were born two children: Charles, deceased; Esther Rebecca, residing at home.
 

HAROLD GILES HOFFMAN.—To be the grandson of an artist, and the great-grandson of a sculptor, is a distinction given to very few in this world, yet such is the good fortune of Harold Giles Hoffman. His maternal grandfather, James Crawford Thom, was a noted American artist and a pupil of Edouard Frire. He exhibited his paintings in London at the National Academy of Design and at the International Exhibit in Paris, at this latter being the winner of the gold medal. His mother's grandfather was James Thom, a Scotchman by birth, and a noted sandstone sculptor, two of his studies, "Souter Johnny," and "Tam O'Shanter," in Edinburgh, being considered the world's best work in sandstone sculpture.

The parents of Harold Giles Hoffman are Frank and Ada Crawford (Thom) Hoffman, the latter being the daughter of James Crawford Thom, the artist referred to in the foregoing paragraph. Frank Hoffman is a resident of South Amboy, and was formerly superintendent of the Raritan River Railroad, and for some years chief of the county detective system. Frank Hoffman is greatly interested in political matters and is actively identified with the Republican party in Middlesex county, being well known as a successful organizer.

Harold Giles Hoffman was born in South Amboy, New Jersey, February 7, 1896. His education was acquired in the public schools there, graduating from the high school in the class of 1913. He also took a special course at the University of Dijon, France. Mr. Hoffman's first business engagement was with the Perth Amboy "Evening News," he being a reporter for it and also the sporting editor. He is now the treasurer of the South Amboy Trust Company, a position he has held since its organization on July I, 1919. He is also the secretary of and one of the board of directors of this banking institution. It is interesting to note that he is one of the youngest cashiers in the State, if not the youngest.

When the United States entered the World War, Harold Giles Hoffman enlisted in the National Guard of the State of New Jersey as a private in Company H. On May 12, 1917, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant, and in October of the same year he was transferred to Company E, One Hundred and Fourteenth Infantry. On April 19, 1918, Mr. Hoffman received the commission of .second lieutenant, and on June 12, 1918, sailed overseas with Headquarters Company, One Hundred and Fourteenth Infantry, serving in center sector, Alsace, from July 25, 1918, to September 23, 1018. Lieutenant Hoffman qualified as 37 mm. and trench mortar expert at Fort Plenoy, Langre, France. On September 28, 1918, he was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant, and while in action north of Verdun was raised to the rank of captain, October 28, 1918, his regiment being cited for its part in this same engagement. Captain Hoffman was engaged in a succession of prominent battles ; on October 8, 1918, at Malbrouck Hill ; on October 11th, in an attack on Bois d'Ormont ; October i6th, at the capture of Etraye Ridge; October 18th, at the battle of Molleville Farm ; October 26th, Grand -Montagne; and Belleau Woods, October 28, 1918. Captain Hoffman was in command of Headquarters Company; One Hundred and Fourteenth Infantry, up to the time of their discharge at Camp Dix, New Jersey, June 4, 1919.

A member of the American Legion, Harold Giles Hoffman is past commander of Luke A. Lovely Post, No. 62. He is also A member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of South Amboy. On January 1, 1921, he took office as city treasurer of South Amboy.
At Long Branch, New Jersey, September 20, 1919, Harold Giles Hoffman was married to Lillie M. Moss, the daughter of Dr. William P. and Ada G. Moss. Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman are the parents of a daughter, Ada, born January 24, 1921.

 

JOSEPH BROGNARD WRIGHT.—For a period of two hundred years and more the record of the Wright family has been a part of the history of New Jersey. The first record of the progenitor of the family in America, Robert Wright, occurs in Wrightstown, which was named after the family at the time of William Penn's landing in this country, Robert Wright having come over with him.

Samuel Gardner Wright, son of Samuel G. Wright, and father of the subject of this review, was born on the old farm in Monmouth county, October 15, 1815. Samuel G. Wright, Sr., was elected to Congress in 1843 from Burlington and Monmouth counties, and was a Whig. The son, Samuel Gardner Wright, graduated from Princeton College, and was a farmer all his life. He served his country in the navy for nine years during the Mexican War, and was a master-at-firms. He married Margaret Brognard, granddaughter of Dr. Brognard, who came to this country with Lafayette. Mrs. Wright was born in Watertown, New York, October 12, 1815, and died in Monmouth county at the age of fifty-two years. Mr. and Mrs. Wright were the parents of five children : Edward, deceased ; Joseph Brognard, of further mention ; Samuel, deceased; Eugene, a resident of Florida ; Ida, wife of Frederick Kervan, of Bayside, Long Island, and a large dealer in tropical plants in New York City.

Joseph Brognard Wright was born on the old farm in Monmouth county, which has been in the family for over two hundred years, January as, 1852, and attended the public schools of his native place until he was eighteen years of age, when he went to work on his father's farm and there continued for five years or until he went to Philadelphia, where he became a salesman for six years, subsequently coming to New Brunswick, where in two he established himself in business, first, for three years, in insurance only, then added real estate, in which latter he has been very active. It was, through his efforts that George street was widened and he also started the business trend to that thoroughfare, which is now the main business artery.

In politics he is a Republican and has been very active in that party. In 1914 he was a candidate for mayor on the Progressive ticket. He is president of the Middlesex Auto Club of New Brunswick, and president of the Real Estate Board of the city. In religion he is a Baptist and attends the church of that denomination in New Brunswick.

Mr. Wright has always been one of the active factors in the promotion of anything to advance the best interests of his home city. He is regarded as one of the best judges of property, and is often called upon to serve as an appraiser for large corporations as well as individuals and estates.

Mr. Wright married (first) Anna M. Duncan, of Hightstown New Jersey, who died in New Brunswick, in 1908. To Mr. and Mrs. Wright were born six children : Eliza A., wife of Harry F. Soden,.of Freehold, New Jersey; Emma J., a resident of Trenton; Lester C., an engineer on-the Pennsylvania Railroad, married Anna Collins; Elizabeth D., wife of Irving L. Owen, of New Brunswick, New Jersey; Isabella S., wife of George S. Gowen, of East Orange, New Jersey; Oneita M., wife of David Succop, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Mr. Wright married (second) December 5, 1912, Sarah Goodenaugh, daughter of William Goodenaugh, of Farmingdale, Monmouth county, New Jersey, a granddaughter of Judge Goodenaugh, of Monmouth county, New Jersey. The family home is located at Livingston Manor, New Brunswick.
 

FREDERICK F. ANNESS.—In July, 1900, at Woodbridge, New Jersey, Frederick F. Anness, a prominent manufacturer and clay miner, organized the Anness & Potter Fire Clay Company, taking over the clay mining business of Lewis C. Potter. In 1902, in addition to clay mining, they built a large plant for the manufacture of hollow tile, and since that time the firm of Armen & Potter has enjoyed a• large and growing business and now stands in the group of prominent clay miners and manufacturers of Middlesex county.

Frederick F. Anness was born January 12, 1860, at Woodbridge, New Jersey, son of Charles and Adaline (Stagg) Anness. Charles Anness first became a resident of Woodbridge about Ifiss, corning here from New England. He conducted a clay mining business for a time at Woodbridge, and about 1864 became a manufacturer of fire brick at Spa Spring, part of Perth Amboy, under the firm name of Charles :Ariness & Sons, the sons, Charles W. and Samuel I. Anness. About 1888 the firm name changed and it became known as the Anness & Lyle Manufacturing Company, with the following officers: Charles Anness, president; Robert W. Lyle, vice-president and secretary,. and Frederick F. Anness, treasurer and general manager. A large business was built up, and their line of fire brick, sewer pipe, and other clay products, became well known to the trade. In 2892 they sold out to the Staten Island Clay Company.

Frederick F. Anness was educated in private schools at Woodbridge and Perth Amboy, and Pennington Seminary, at Pennington, New Jersey. At the age of eighteen years, he started in the clay manufacturing business under his father and soon became thoroughly experienced in this industry, later becoming superintendent of the plant. At the organization of the Anness & Lyle Manufacturing Company, he took active part in its inception and continued as its treasurer and general manager until the disposal of the business to the Staten Island Clay Company. He then retired from the clay business until 1900, when the organization of the Anness & Potter Fire Clay Company took place. The first officers of this new company were: L. C. Potter, president; Frederick F. Anness, vice-president, treasurer and general manager, and Louis E. Potter, secretary. Later the Potter interests were purchased . by Mr. Anness, and the present officers are : Frederick' F. Anness,..president and treasurer, and James J. Livingood, Jr., secretary. Mr. Livingood has been in the employ of the company since 1909, and is now a stockholder and takes an active part in the management of the manufacturing end of the business. Mr. Anness has given his undivided time to his business and has not indulged- to any. extent in. fraternal or club circles. He is interested in the welfare of the community life of Woodbridge and ever ready to further any good movement for public benefit. He is a staunch Republican and abides by the best interests of his part. During the World War he was active in the various war work campaigns ih which Woodbridge showed itself so well.

Mr. Anness married, in 1887, Mina D. Potter, daughter of Louis C. Potter, of Woodbridge. Mrs. Anness died August 12, 1919.
 

FREDERICK LANE BROWN, M. D.—Since 1912 Dr. Brown has practiced medicine in New Brunswick, New Jersey, his success being most gratifying to his professional ambition and to his many friends. He is a son of James (2) Brown, grandson of James (t), and great-grandson of Samuel Brown, of Scotch ancestry, all of whom were of Irish birth of County Armagh. Samuel Brown was a farmer, and resided about forty miles from Belfast, his death occurring in 1862, aged seventy.

James (1) Brown was born at the homestead in Ireland, August 5, 1816, died at Pluckemin, Somerset county, New Jersey, February 20, 1890. He disliked farm labor and engaged in milling and merchandising. He married in Ireland, and in June, 1851, he came to the United States, settling at Pluckemin, New Jersey, where he died thirty-nine years later. His wife, Margaret Stewart, died at Pluckemin, April 5, 1896, in her eighty-fourth year; she was a daughter of Hugh Stewart, of County Armagh, Ireland. James and Margaret (Stewart) Brown were the parents of seven children: Stewart; Isabella, married James Chambers ; Margaret; Samuel, died in infancy; James (2), of further mention ; Anna ; and Josiah, who died at the age of thirteen years.

James (2) Brown, son of James (I) and Margaret (Stewart) Brown, was born in the County Armagh, in the North of Ireland, November 28, 1849, and in 1851 was brought to the United States by his parents. He was educated in the school of Pluckemin, Somerset county, New Jersey, where the family settled, and in April, 1869, began business life in a Pluckemin store. In November, 1870, he began business for himself in Pluckemin. He also engaged in the manufacture of clothing there until 1884 when he moved to Somerville, New Jersey, and in a small way manufactured clothing. He prospered from the first, and the plant he built at the corner of Main street and Doughty avenue, three stories in height, soon required an addition almost as large as the original building. Steady progress was made and about 1894 the business was incorporated under the name of the Somerville Woolen Mills, of which he was made treasurer and general manager. Mr. Brown, during his active years, in addition to the upbuilding of such an industry, took deep interest in political affairs, and was an active member of the Second Reformed Church, an elder and assistant Sunday school superintendent. Politically he was a Republican.

Mr. Brown married (first) May 16, 1878, Gertrude Potter Lane, who died March 19, 1890, leaving three children ; Nellie Louisa, born July 9, 1880; Frederick Lane, of further mention; Jennie C., born August 9, z886. Mr. Brown married (second) in June, 1892, Ella Lane, sister of his first wife, and they were the parents of three children : Gertrude, born June 19, 1893; Hugh Stewart, born November 1, 1896; and James Douglas.

Frederick Lane Brown, son of James (2) and Gertrude Potter( Lane) Brown, was born in Somerville, New Jersey, January 13, 1883, and until 1898 attended public school there. He then spent two years at Leal's Preparatory School in Plainfield, New Jersey, and in 1901 he attended Princeton University, whence he was graduated A. B., class of 1935. He spent the years ,1905-1906 in the employ of the American Locomotive Company, then decided upon the medical profession. He entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons (Columbia University) of New York City, receiving his M. D. with the graduating class of 191o. He was interne at Bellevue Hospital (New York City) until 1912, and then began the private practice of his profession in New Brunswick, New Jersey, where the eight years which have since intervened have brought him professional honor and ample reward. He is a member of the county and State medical societies, and holds the esteem of his brethren of the profession. He is a member of both St. Peter's and the Middlesex hospitals. He is also a member of the Young Men's Christian Association, and of the First Reformed Church, and his favorite recreation is golf.
Dr. Brown married, June 15, 1912, in New Brunswick, Esther May Suydam, daughter of Peter Hoagland and Phoebe Ann (Coombs) Suydam, and they are the parents of two' children: Phoebe Ew.her, born June 27, 1914; and Frederick Lane (2), born June 7, 1916. The doctor resides at No. 67 Livingston avenue.
 

LEONARD MORTON RATLIFF.—The Ratliff family, of which Leonard Morton Ratliff is a member, is a very old one in America; the first of the name coming to this country as early as 1775. They were originally Manxmen, having their homes on the Isle of Man, that self-governed island in the Irish Sea, jut off the coast of Great Britain, a sturdy race with strong characteristics.

Mr. Ratliff's father, John Ratliff, is a retired farmer and now lives at Marion, Indiana. He was born in 1848, in Henry county, Indiana, and married Isabelle Larison, who was born in 1858, at Amboy, Indiana, and died in 1887, at the age of twenty-nine. Their children were: 1. Leonard Morton, of whom further. 2. Ruah May, the wife of William Adams, a farmer living near Springfield, Illinois. 3. Myrle, married John McCartney, a garage owner of Bunkerhill, Indiana. 4. Eurah, wife of Elmer Ridenour, a farmer of Lagro, Indiana. 5. Alvah, who died in infancy.

Leonard Morton Ratliff, son of John and Isabelle (Larison) Ratliff, was born February 7, 188o, at Fairmount, Indiana, but when he was two years old his family moved to Amboy, Indiana, remaining there until he reached the age of seven years when they again changed their place of residence, going to Converse, Indiana. Here the boy was educated, passing through the various grades of study until he graduated from the Converse High School at the age of sixteen (1896). The young man then obtained a position as clerk in a drug store at Francesville, Indiana, where he remained for five years. At this time he determined to take up the study of ophthalmology and became enrolled as a student at the Illinois College of Ophthalmology, completing a two years' course in that branch of treatment in 1902. For the next few years Mr. Ratliff. practiced in Francesville, Indiana, then, deciding to come East, he located in New Brunswick, in 1908. On July I, 1917, he established an office at No. 361 George street, where he remained until May, 1920, since which time he has been located at No. 336 George street, his present address.

While devoted to his business, Mr. Ratliff finds time to spend in' recreation and to take an active part in the affairs of his city. He is interested in all matters pertaining to the schools and is a member of the Board of Education of Highland Park, holding office since April 1, 1920. He is interested in Masonic affairs, being a member of the Metuchen Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; Scott Chapter, No. 4, Royal Arch Masons ; also of the Craftsmen's Club of New Brunswick, and the New Jersey State Optometrical Society.

On June 17, 1900, the marriage of Leonard Morton Ratliff and Lulu Severns was solemnized in Francesville, Indiana. Miss Severns was born in Columbus, Ohio, the daughter of Orin Severns, of Francesville, a retired farmer, and his wife, Dorothy (Mahoney) Severna. Three children were born of this union: Eva Ruth, born July 17, 1901, died at the age of four and a half years; the next two were twin boys, Herbert Morton and Harold Leonard, born May r, 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Ratliff have a very pleasant home on Grant avenue, Highland Park.
 

CHARLES DIPPOLT SNEDEKER.—The records of the Holland Society of New York, of which Charles D. Snedeker, of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, is a member, show that he is a direct descendant in male line from Jan Snedeker, who came from Holland to New Amsterdam in 16411, was a patentee of land in Flatbush, and one of the founders of the Flatbush Dutch Church.. Cornelius Snedeker, of this branch of the family, was a merchant of New Brunswick, New Jersey, a member of the Board of Aldermen of that city, and a man of influence in public; business and private life. He married Mary Stonaker and among their children was a son Charles Dippolt Snedeker, who for more than a quarter of a century has been secretary and treasurer of Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company.

Charles Dippolt Snedeker is a native son of Middlesex and, with the exception of his early business training in New York City, has devoted all his business life to the affairs of the company named. He is a world traveler, his journeys having taken him to all parts of his own country, to most of the countries of Europe, to Egypt and the Holy land. Public-spirited and progressive, he has given time to the public service, and during the war period, 1917-18, was a patriotic supporter of all war measures and, through his corporation, the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company, did his utmost in keeping ships afloat. He was born July 17, 1861., in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and there completed public school courses with high school graduation, finishing with a course at New Jersey Business College, in Newark. He began his business career as a clerk in a wholesale house in New York City, there becoming well grounded in business principles and in metropolitan methods of management and operation. After a few years in business in New Brunswick, completing his New York training, he formed an association with the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company of Perth Amboy, and upon the reorganization of that company in 1894, he was elected to the position he has ever since held, secretary-treasurer. This company has had a very successful and prosperous life, and during the war period was one of the active agencies in building, repairing and outfitting American and allied vessels. Mr. Snedeker has other business interests of importance, particularly in financial institutions, he now being vice-president and director of the First National Bank of Perth Amboy, and director of the First National Bank of Roosevelt, New Jersey.
In political faith Mr. Snedeker is a Democrat, and for two terms served the city of Perth Amboy as president of the Board of Water Commissioners, as member of the Board of Health, and a trustee of the City Library. He is a member of the Holland Society of New York, n fellow of the American Geographical Society, member of the New Jersey Historical Society, and of the First Presbyterian Church of Perth Amboy. During•the period devoted to the erection of the present church edifice, Mr. Snedeker served as chairman of the building committee. His clubs are: The East Jersey, of Perth Amboy; Union, of New Brunswick ; and Golf, of Colonia, New Jersey. His favorite recreation or relaxation is travel, and he has catered abundantly to that particular form of personal enjoyment. During the period of war with Germany, he took a particularly deep interest in the sale of war savings stamps, and was chairman of the $r,000 Club, composed of men who subscribed for the full limit allowed by the government in one year. He was engaged with the corporation he represents in war work in their particular line, and aided in the various drives for funds and members.

Mr. Snedeker married, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, June 23, 1894, Mary Davison, daughter of John J. Johnson and Sarah (Schenck) Davison. Their only child, Charles Dippolt Snedeker, Jr., died in infancy in 1896.
 

CHARLES VOORHEES HULTS, M. D.—As one of the rising physicians of New Brunswick, perhaps none stands higher in the public estimation than Dr. Charles Voorhees Hults, who though not thirty years of age has made for himself a name in this section of the community that might well be the envy of many a longer established practitioner.

Dr. Eugene A. Hults, father of Dr. Charles Voorhees Hults, was born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, August 26, 1861. Deciding to adopt medicine as his profession, he matriculated at the University of Pennsylvania, medical department, and later at Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia, from which he was graduated in r886. He then immediately returned to Perth Amboy and established himself in the practice of his profession, where he continued until his death, which occurred in 1911. He was health officer for the city and port of Perth Amboy for five years. He married Lucy Voorhees, who was born near Newton, New Jersey, the daughter of Charles Voorhees, who also was born near Newton, in 1813, and whose father in turn fought in the Revolutionary War. Lucy Voorhees was the mother of the following children : Eugene Arthur, Jr., formerly president of a manufacturing concern in Trenton for drying machines for pottery, now general manager for a concern at Saltville, Virginia; Sydney E., public accountant in Detroit, Michigan ; Willard, associated with Merck & Company, chemists at Rahway, New Jersey, and Charles Voorhees, of further mention.

Dr. Charles Voorhees Hults, son of Dr. Eugene A. and Lucy (Voorhees) Hults, was born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, March 14, 1892. After receiving his preliminary Mt:cation in the public schools of his native place, he entered the local high school, from which lie was graduated in 1910, and then matriculated at the New York Homoeopathic Medical College, New York City, receiving from that institution the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1914, the last two years devoting his time to obstetrics. After graduation, he served two years as interne in the Metropolitan Hospital, and for nineteen months was surgeon at the Reception Hospital, New York City. At the expiration of this time he came to New Brunswick and at once entered upon the general practice of his profession, with offices at No. 94 Schureman street. He has continued here ever since, building up an extensive and lucrative practice, and steadily becoming one of the best known,and most highly-respected physicians in this locality.

During the World War, Dr. Hults was a member of the voluntary Medical Service Corporation. He is a member of Phi Alpha Gamma college fraternity. In religion he is a Presbyterian,. being a member and trustee of the First Presbyterian Church of New Brunswick.
On January s, 1916, Dr. Hults was united in marriage with Marion Louise Potter, daughter of Charles H. and Mary (Wells) Potter. Charles H. Potter is president of the Potter Steamship Company of New York City. In all out-of-door exercises, Dr. Hults is keenly interested, and. during his school and college days he played on the football teams. It is hard to predict the future of an already successful young physician who has not yet reached the age of thirty, but his present record gives promise of even a more brilliant future. Dr. Hults resides at No. r Stratford place, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
 

JOHN WALTERMAR OLSEN, one of the most progressive and prosperous business men of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where he is president of the John W. Olsen Company, Incorporated, is well known in this section of the State. The enterprise was founded by Mr. Olsen in 1914, and its success is due to his untiring effort and executive ability.

Lauritz Christian Olsen, father of John Waltermar Olsen, was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, December 23, 1857. Later in life he came to this country and is now custodian of the Middlesex County Vocational School in Perth Amboy. He married Anna Peterson, a native of Copenhagen. To Mr. and Mrs. Olsen have been born five children: Peter C., treasurer and manager of the South Amboy Terra Cotta Manufacturing Company, and president of the Terra Cotta Society of the United States; Fred L., steamfitter in Easton, Pennsylvania; John W., mentioned below; Otto, a mason of Perth Amboy; William, owner and manager of an electrical supply store in Perth Amboy.

John Waltermar Olsen was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, June 17, 1884, the son of Lauritz C. and Anna (Peterson) Olsen. When five years of age he was brought by his mother to this country. Upon landing in this country they came immediately to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where his father had arrived seven months previously and was then employed by the old Perth Amboy Terra Cotta Company. John W. Olsen attended the public schools of Perth Amboy until he was fourteen years of age, when he entered upon his business career. His first employment was with a brick company in Keasbey, where he remained for two years, subsequently becoming employed by the C. Pardee Brick Works. Two years later he became identified with the Raritan Hollow Tile Company, and was with this concern for fourteen years, the last seven of which he occupied the position of general superintendent. In 1914 he established his present coal business which is incorporated under the name of the John W. Olsen Company; Mr. Olsen holding the office of president of the organization, which is located at No. 282 Bertram avenue, Perth Amboy. Not alone is Mr. Olsen identified with this enterprise, for on April I, 1920, he was made a director of the New Jersey Coal Dealers' Association.

In everything pertaining to the welfare and advancement of his adopted city, Mr. Olsen takes a prominent part. He is affiliated with the Benevolent' and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 784; the Woodmen of the World; the Royal Arcanum, and the Improved Order of Red Men. He also holds membership in the Bohemian Club, the Frem Singing Society, the Concordia Singing Society, the Raritan Yacht Club, and the Woodcock Association.

On December 16, 1912, Mr. Olsen was united in marriage with Mathilda J. Peterson, daughter of John and Johanna (Madsen) Peterson. Mr. Peterson was a prominent citizen of Perth Amboy and died here in April, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. Olsen are the parents of two children : John Martin, born November 8, 1913; Cornelia Marie, born February 6, 1917.
 

EGBERT S. PECK.—Son of Silliman and Louisa (Adams) Peck, and a descendant of the ancient and honorable Peck family of Connecticut, Egbert S. Peck came rightfully by his business sagacity, his ancestors being successful business men.
Egbert S. Peck was born near Bethel, Connecticut, May 9, 1840, and died at Saratoga Springs, New York, August 3, 189o, after a very successful business career. He received his education in the district schools of Connecticut, and when a young man, less than twenty years of age, became a carpenter's apprentice and learned the trade. However, he did not remain long at this occupation, for having a business trend of mind, he came to New Brunswick, New Jersey, about 1868, where he clerked for a time in one of the local shoe stores. He managed to accumulate a little capital and then embarked in business for himself, opening a retail shoe store on Church street, New Brunswick. This enterprise was very successful, as is evidenced by the fact that after a few years he was able to organize a company for the purpose of selling boots and shoes at wholesale under the firm name of E. S. Peck & Company, their place of business being on Duane street, New York City. He continued his retail establishment in New Brunswick, dividing his time between the two cities. As time went by his business in New York City increased to such large proportions that he decided to dispose of his retail store in order to devote all of his time to his New York interests; this was about 1879. He remained on Duane street until 1887, then having acquired much knowledge of the shoe trade both in a retail and wholesale way, he returned to New Brunswick and with Fletcher and William S. Felter organized the Middlesex Shoe Company, manufacturers of shoes. In 1889 he purchased the Felter interests in the firm and ran the business independently until the time of his death.

Mr. Peck was a man of strong character and direct action, realizing the value of personal development, for he, himself, was once a poor boy without unusual opportunities to assist him. The fine traits of his good New England ancestors he inherited, and they were of more value to him than worldly goods. By doing well everything he attempted, and striving to succeed, he built up a business which was a credit to him. His integrity won for him many friends, both inside and outside of his business, and his commonwealth was glad to claim him as one of its front rank citizens. He had many friends outside of the State, and in New York City and New Brunswick, where most of his activities were, he was a leader in the business life. He stood high in Metuchen, where he made his home, and his death was a shock and a great loss to all who knew him.

Mr. Peck took a great interest in all things connected with Metuchen. His interest as a voter in local political matters was of great importance to him, for he started with his vote at home to direct the destinies of the State and country. He was a strong and influential Republican, and his advice was often sought in political matters. Fraternally he was a member of the Masonic order, and in religious faith a Presbyterian. 

Mr. Peck married, October 22, 1873, in the Presbyterian church at Metuchen, New Jersey, Henrietta H. Thomas, born December 18, 1847, in Metuchen, daughter of Louis and Rachel (Clarkson) Thomas. Louis Thomas was born in Woodbury, Connecticut, and was a farmer and dealer in properties; his wife, Rachel (Clarkson) Thomas, was born at Oak Tree, Woodbridge township, New Jersey, a daughter of Joseph Clarkson, one of the old settlers near Oak Tree. Three sons were born to Mr. and. Mrs. Peck: Louis Thomas, born May 19, 1875 ; Egbert, born September 10, 1878, died May 15, 1905; Frederick Clarkson, born April 26, 1889. Mrs. Henrietta H. (Thomas) Peck yet survives her husband, and resides with her sons in the house in Metuchen, New Jersey, built by her father, Louis Thomas, in 1872.


GEORGE BROWN RULE.—The name of Rule is one of the earliest of English names in America. The immigrant ancestor of this family was sent by the King of England to look after the copper interests in this territory, and was invested with military rank, as the mining projects here were under the direction of the military authorities of Great Britain.

Mr. Rule's father, George Rule, was born in New York City. When about two years of age, his mother, a widow, removed to Monmouth Junction, New Jersey, where he was bound out until he was eighteen years of age to a farmer, John Stout, and rebound at eighteen to a man by the name of Steadman, of Princeton, New Jersey, to learn the carpenter's trade. At about twenty-five years of age he came to New Brunswick, where he established the business which he left in the hands of his son upon his death in 1894. The location, No. 71 John street, has always been the same. George Rule married Rachel A. Smith, who was born in New Brunswick, and died in 1912. They were the parents of four children : George Brown, whose name heads this review ; Howard C., who is now secretary of the New Brunswick Savings Institution; John Stout, who died at the age of seven years; and Sarah Janet, who makes her home with her brother, George B. Rule.

George Brown Rule was born in New Brunswick, March 26, 1861. He received a practical education in the public schools of this city, continuing his attendance until he was sixteen years of age. He then began as an apprentice in carpenter work, serving for five years, thereafter working as a journeyman for his father in the same factory which he now owns. 'Taking over the business upon his father's death, he added to the structure which his father erected, and now has the largest plant of its kind in Middlesex county. In his mill department he manufactures sash, doors, etc., for his own use in connection with his extensive construction operations. Thus he has been identified all his life with the building interests of New Brunswick, and has erected many of the structures which line the streets of the city. Mr. Rule is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Union Club. He has been a director of Middlesex General Hospital for the past twenty-five years, member of executive committee and member of house and grounds committee, chairman of the latter for some twenty-five years. He spends his leisure time largely in motoring, taking an occasional fishing excursion.
 

HARVEY IREDELL, D. D. S., one of the most successful dentists of New Brunswick, New Jersey, where he has been active since 1880, is a native of Horsham, Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred September 25, 1856. He is a direct descendant of the emigrant, Thomas Iredell, who located at Horsham in the early part of the seventeenth century, having come from England. Harvey Iredell is the son of John Barnes and Sarah Ann Iredell. John Barnes Iredell was born in Horsham, July 16, 1832, and died from the result of an accident, in Philadelphia, at the age of sixty-five years.

For twelve years he was a school teacher, and later became a shoe manufacturer, which latter occupation he followed for the remainder of his life. To Mr. and Mrs. Iredell were born two children : Harvey, mentioned below ; Mary Ella, wife of Dr. William T. Wyckoff, of Philadelphia.

The childhood of Harvey Iredell until his twelfth year was passed in his native place, after which he moved with his parents to Philadelphia, where he continued his studies in the schools of the latter place. He was associated with his father in the shoe manufacturing for three or four years. Having a desire for a professional career, he entered the Philadelphia Dental College and was graduated from this institution in 1880. He then went to Trenton, New Jersey, where he practiced his profession, but remained here for six months only, subsequently coming to New Brunswick, where he associated himself with Drs. Hull and Palmer as an operative dentist, and filled this position for eight years. Then, having purchased Dr. Palmer's interest in the firm, he formed a co-partnership with Dr. Henry A. Hull and continued in the same relationship for about eight years, when he purchased his partner's interest and continued the practice alone for several years at the old location, afterwards removing to the National Bank of New Jersey's new building when it was finished for occupancy. Dr. Iredell is the successor to the old practice which was formed in the fifties by A. D. Newell, who associated with him Dr. Edward W. Robbins. Here he has developed a large and high-class practice, and is regarded as among the leaders of his profession in the county.

In politics he is a Republican. He is also prominent in the Masonic organization, having attained all of the degrees excepting the thirty-third, and affiliated with the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. He holds membership in the Gun Club of New Brunswick. As may be judged by the nature of this club, Dr. Iredell is exceedingly fond of open-air life and to all pastimes associated with out-of-doors. He greatly enjoys hunting and fishing, and spends much of his spare time thus employed, but his chief relaxation is gardening and to this he devotes some time each day.

Dr. Iredell married (first) June 29, 1882, Mary Emma Williams, who died in New Brunswick, in 1898, and to them were born three children: Alma Hull, wife of Clarence H. Bruce, of New Brunswick ; Russell Walton, an artist of New York City; Albert Williams, a mechanical dentist of Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. Iredell married (second) Bessie Young. No issue.
 

WALTER PARKER RUNYON.—It is the fate of the cities of New Jersey, fortunate or otherwise, that the gigantic size and financial importance of their great neighbor in flue adjacent State inevitably overshadows them and gives to them something of the character of suburbs, yet a number of them contain industrial interests equal or superior to those that have given a national prominence to other communities somewhat further removed from the metropolitan giant of the New World. Several concerns located in one or the other of these busy and prosper ous cities, have arisen to such size and importance as to emerge from the general class of local enterprises into a more individual distinction, and have become, either from their mere dimensions or because of their response to the particular needs of the time, the subjects of a wider and more universal attention. More than one such concern is to be found in the city of Perth Amboy and of these, perhaps the most notable, is the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company, the present importance of which is largely the result of the practical genius of Walter Parker Runyon, whose qualities as a business man and citizen have won him the respect and admiration of his associates and the community-at-large.

Walter Parker Runyon is a member of one of the oldest families of New Jersey which has played a conspicuous part in its affairs for a number of generations, and comes of French Huguenot stock, which has contributed one of the most substantial and capable elements to the citizenship of the country. The family was founded in the New World by Vincent Rognion, who left his native land to search for the religious and political freedom denied the Huguenots in France after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. This Vincent Rognion settled in the vicinity of New Brunswick, New Jersey, and from him is sprung the numerous family which has made the name in its anglicized form so generally known in the State and elsewhere. One of his descendants, another Vincent Runyon, as the name had then come to be spelled, was the grandfather of Walter P. Runyon, and the founder of the business that has since grown to such importance. He was assisted in his venture by his son, John Runyon, who afterwards carried it on, and who married Anne Beck, of New Brunswick. They were the parents of Walter Parker Runyon.

Walter P. Runyon was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, December 3, 1861, and his childhood was passed in his native city. As a lad he attended the public schools of New Brunswick, and later the Rutgers Preparatory School, from which he was graduated in 1878. During his school days he had spent much of his time in the old shipyard founded by his grandfather, and as he grew to man's estate became ambitious of a business career, so that upon completing his general studies he entered the New Jersey Business College in order to prepare himself. He was graduated from the lastnamed institution in 188o, and promptly secured a clerical position with the firm of Fairbanks, Martin & Company, woolen commission merchants, of New York City. Four years were spent by him in the employ of this concern, during which time he became thoroughly familiar with general business methods and further fitted himself for the part he was to play in the business world. The two years following found him with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York, but his ambition ever urged him to become independent, and accordingly he severed his connection with that enormous institution and entered into partnership with the firm of Vliet & Dalmer, manufacturing clothiers of his native New Brunswick. It was during this time that he first became associated with Charles D. Snedeker, who has since continued his partner in the great enterprises that he has headed. These two gentlemen were instrumental in organizing a new company which absorbed the old firm of Vliet & Dalmer soon after his connection with it, and which met with a high degree of success from the outset. It thus became possible, in x894, for Mr. Runyon and Mr. 8netteker to purchase the interest of the John Runyon estate in the PerthAmboy Dry Dock Company, and shortly afterwards a close corporation Was formed with Mr. Runyon at the head, which took over the entire stock of the old concern. The Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company was at that time a comparatively small business, but since then it has steadily grown under the capable management of Mr. Runyon to its present position of prominence. The yard and its equipment have been continually increased to keep pace with the growing business and now possesses five balance dry docks of io,000, 2,500, 2,000, i,000 and soo tons capacity, respectively. These are equipped with patent adjustable keel blocks, while a twenty-five ton derrick is in operation to lift and transport the heavy steel structural work in use in marine construction. All needed supplies are kept constantly on hand, and the great water frontage of more than a thousand feet, extending over four blocks, affords ample pier space for new vessels and those seeking repairs. Machine shops of the most modern type are maintained, and the large boiler works are in constant operation. This great enterprise is still undergoing a steady expansion and is already one of the best known of its kind along the Atlantic coast. Mr. Runyon is president of the concern, and Mr. Snedeker its treasurer.

In addition to his own great business, Mr. Runyon is associated with many other financial and business interests of this region and is vice-president of the Raritan Trust Company and a director of the New Brunswick Fire Insurance Company, New Brunswick, New Jersey, and the Perth Amboy Trust Company, of Perth Amboy. His activities extend into other fields besides business and connect him with many departments of the communities affairs, and he is a member of many important organizations and clubs here and elsewhere. He is vice-president of the Perth Amboy Hospital Association, and a member of the National Security League, the New Jersey Historical Society, the United States Chamber of Commerce, the Maritime Association of the Port of New York, the Manufacturers' Association, the Perth Amboy Chamber of Commerce, the Young Men's Christian Association of Perth Amboy, of which he is also a trustee; vice-president of the Raritan Terminal and Waterways Association, and member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. He is prominent in social, club and fraternal circles, and is a member of the Royal Arcanum, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Lake Placid Club, the East Jersey Club, the Raritan Yacht Club, and the Union Club of New Brunswick. He is a life member of the National Marine League of the United States of America, and a member of its board of trustees. Mr. Runyon has always taken keen pleasure in outdoor life of all kinds, and at present spends his leisure time at the Lake Placid Club in the Adirondack Mountains and motors a great deal through that picturesque region. He is also fond of mountain climbing and fishing and engages in these sports to a considerable extent.

The participation of Mr. Runyon in public affairs in his home region has been notable, and he is one of the most influential members of the Democratic party in the State. He has served as a member of the Democratic executive committee of New Brunswick and the Democratic executive committee of Middlesex county. He was alternate delegate to the National Democratic Convention in 1908, and delegate to the party convention four years later, and has served on numerous State conventions during the past. Mr. Runyon has also served the community in several official capacities, and as a member of the New Brunswick Water Board and the Perth Amboy Water Department Commission was instrumental in developing the fine water supply now enjoyed by both cities. In 1913 he was appointed by Governor Fielder, of New Jersey, a member of the New Jersey State Harbor Commission, and the following year, when the Board of Commerce and Navigation succeeded to the older body, became a member thereof. His services on these bodies was of such value that when Governor Edge was elected he reappointed him. Mr. Runyon has also represented New Jersey for some years at the annual meetings of the Atlantic Deeper Waterways Conventions. In 1916 he was the president of the New Jersey Wilson Business Men's League. 

Walter Parker Runyon was united in marriage, January to, 1895, with Katherine Engle Hancock, a daughter of the Rev. Ezekiel Cooper and Emma Jean (Githens) Hancock, of Burlington county, New Jersey. Mrs. Runyon's death occurred on Christmas Day, December 25, 1919. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Runyon, as .follows : Cooper Hancock, born September 3, 1896, died October 26, 1919; and Walter Parker, Jr.
 

CARL CHRISTIAN CHRISTENSEN.—The record of a life begun on Old World soil bears peculiar interest. Coming to this country when a young man, overcoming all the obstacles which meet one unfamiliar with the language and customs, Carl Christian Christensen has made a place for himself, founded a home for his family, and won a good measure of material success through his own unaided efforts.
Christian Christensen, his father, was an industrious farmer in Denmark, and died when Carl C. was six years old. He married Anna Hansen, who was also born in Denmark and died there. They were the parents of five children, of whom three are living: John and Mary, who are still in Denmark, and Carl Christian, of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, who has built some of the representative structures which beautify the streets of that city.

Carl Christian Christensen was born in Denmark, October 21, 1871, on his father's farm. There he learned the homely duties about the place to help his mother in her struggle with the world, attending school until he was fourteen years of age. He then learned the trade of mason and carpenter, working steadily and saving all he could to make his real start in life. At eighteen years of age he crossed the sea and came to America. He came alone, and located at once in Perth Amboy. Soon he found work at his trade and threw himself into the task of establishing his future success. He realized the advantage in the hands of the man who is working for himself, and at the age of twenty-five cut all his business ties and went into business on his own responsibility. The principles of industry and thrift which he learned as a lad had become a habit, and he was quickly seen to be forging ahead. Thirteen years ago he built for himself a fine residence at No. 139 State street, where he still resides. He has erected many of the important edifices of Perth Amboy, including the Danish Lutheran church, the Penn Street Catholic church, and the Danish Methodist church.

Mr. Christensen has not confined his progressive activities to the business world. He has entered with the keenest zest into every public interest, ably filling for five years a position on the local Board of Education. He is director of the Perth Amboy Savings Institution, and Citizens' Building and Loan Association, and vice-president of the Perth Amboy Building and Loan Association. He is a member of the Danish Lutheran church, and active in all its work. Motoring is his favorite recreation at the close of the day's business, and whenever he can find time to spare for relaxation. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of the Dana Society.

Mr. Christensen married, October 21, 1936, in Perth Amboy, Anna Hansen, daughter of Nels Hansen. She was born in Perth Amboy, her father being a pioneer among the Danish population of this vicinity. Mr. and Mrs. Christensen had seven children and have lost two. They are as follows: Nels, who is associated with his father in all his building operations; Walter, who holds the position of assistant treasurer of the Perth Amboy Savings Bank; Arnold, manager of the C. & S. Company, of Perth Amboy ; Carl, who died at the age of two years; Annette, who died at the age of fourteen years ; Kathryn ; and Eleanor.
 

JACOB MORTIMER KLEIN, one of the most successful of the younger members of the bar of Middlesex county, New Jersey, and an influential citizen of Perth Amboy, was born February T, 1889, in New York City, a son of Max and Leah (Berman) Klein, the former a native of Bohemia and the latter of London, England. The elder Mr. Klein was born December 16, 1864, arid came to the United States when but sixteen years of age, locating in New York City, where he later was engaged in business as a diamond merchant for twelve years. In two he came to New Jersey and since that time has made his home in Perth Amboy, where he is still engaged in the diamond business. Max Klein and his wife became the parents of two children : Jacob Mortimer, of further mention ; and William H., who also resides in Perth Amboy, but is engaged in business as a manufacturer in New York City.

Jacob Mortimer Klein passed the first eleven years of his life in New York City and while there attended the local public schools. He was then brought by his parents to live in Perth Amboy, continuing to attend the public schools, and graduating from the grammar grades in 1903, and from the Perth Amboy High School in 1907, being president of his class. In the meantime he had determined upon a professional career, and with this end in view matriculated in the New York Law School, from which he was graduated with the class of 191o, taking the degree of LL. B., later reading law in the office of Joseph E. Tucker, prosecuting attorney of Middlesex county. The following year he was admitted to the bar of New Jersey, and in 1912 began his law practice in Perth Amboy. Since that time he has continued in active practice there and is to-day generally recognized as one of the most able members of the local bar and handles much important litigation in and about Perth Amboy. Mr. Klein is a Democrat in politics and has interested himself actively in public affairs, though his participation in this line was interrupted somewhat by his war service. In 1916 he was a candidate for the Democratic nomination for the recordership of Perth Amboy. He ran for the recordership in 1920, but went down to defeat in the Republican landslide with the rest of his ticket. On December 13, 1917, he enlisted in the national army at Fort Thomas, Kentucky. He was quickly promoted from the ranks to be a corporal and from that again to be a sergeant and then sergeant of the first class. He won his commission as second lieutenant, July 26, 1918, and as first lieutenant three months later. He was an officer in Field Remount Squadron, No. 324, located at Camp Johnston, Jacksonville, Florida, preparing for overseas service when the armistice was signed. He was honorably discharged from the service, March 3, 1918, returning immediately to civil life and the practice of his profession. Prominent in social and fraternal circles in Perth Amboy, Mr. Klein is a member of a number of clubs and other organizations, among which should be mentioned the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, the Raritan Yacht Club, the Perth Amboy Gun Club, American Legion, Perth Amboy Post, No. 45, Raritan Terminal and Waterways Association, and the Perth Amboy Democratic Club.

Jacob Mortimer Klein was united in marriage, December, 1917, with Agnes Sayler, a native of Huntington, Indiana, and a daughter of John M. and Jennie (Wampler) Sayler, highly respected residents of that place, where Mr. Sayler is now a prominent attorney. Mr. Sayler's father was judge of Huntington County Court for several terms, and was also a member of Congress from his district. Mr. and Mrs. Klein are the parents of two children: Jacob Mortimer, Jr., born October 7, 1918, and Jane, born November 8, 1920.
 

CHARLES HENRY DUNHAM, D. D. S.—For nearly two decades, Dr. Dunham has practiced his profession in New Brunswick, New Jersey, locating in that, the chief city of his native county about three years after his graduation from dental college., He is of an old Middlesex county family, founded in New England by John Dunham, and in Midelesex county, New Jersey, by Benajah Dunham, about 1671. Benajah Dunham, born in 164o, married Elizabeth Tilson, and came from East-ham, on Cape Cod. He had but one son, Edmund Dunham, but through him was founded a very large and influential New Jersey family.

Edmund Dunham, born July 25, 1661, in Massachusetts, is best known as the distinguished founder in New Jersey of the religious sect known as "The Seventh Day Baptist Church," Dr. Charles H. Dunham descends from Benajah and Edmund Dunham in direct line. His father, Joseph T. Dunham, died in 1917, his mother, Cornelia A. Dunham, in 19I5. Joseph T. Dunham was a carpenter and farmer of Raritan township, Middlesex county, New Jersey, and was township committeeman for a number of years. With the exception of a son, Martin, deceased, and a son in Montana, his six children reside in Middlesex county, a section which has been the abode of Dunhams for two and one-half centuries.

Charles Henry Dunham was born in the village of Piscataway, Raritan township, Middlesex county, New Jersey, April 15, 1874. He attended the public schools of his district and completed the courses so thoroughly that he passed the New York State regents examination most creditably, receiving a certificate to that effect. He became associated with the drug business in New 'York City, but later decided to devote himself to dental surgery, and in 1896 entered the Philadelphia College of Dentistry, whence he was graduated, class of 1899. He did not locate in New Brunswick until 1902, but since then has continuously practiced there. He has been very successful, gaining a clientele which taxes him to properly care for it. He is modern and skillful, courteous and considerate, his pleasing personality winning him a host of friends. His religious faith is that of the Church of Christ (Scientist). His club is the Highland Park Civic, and he is a member of the Middlesex County Dental Society.

Dr. Dunham married, October 29, 1907, Emma Lydall Beekman, born in Highland Park, New Jersey, daughter of John and Emma Beekman, of ancient family. Dr. and Mrs. Dunham are the parents of three children: Olive Beekman, born August 9, 1908; Mildred Minerva, born September 24, 1909; and Charles Henry, born January 19, I911. The family home is at No. 52 North Sixth avenue, Highland Park, New Jersey, where Dr. Dunham indulges in his favorite recreation—home-gardening and the growing of trees,- bushes and shrubs.
 

WILLIAM T. AMES.—As president of the First National Bank, of Woodbridge, New Jersey, Mr. Ames has also to be given credit for establishing, in his native village, this institution of which, as a "native son," he was glad to be the means of adding to the modern benefits of the village. Woodbridge was his birthplace and boyhood home, and he has for the venerable town a real affection.
William' T. Ames, of English ancestry, father of the subject of this review, was born in New York City, where he was a substantial and successful business man. He married Sarah Ayres, and they were the parents of William T. Ames, born in Woodbridge, Middlesex county, New Jersey, February 12, 1869.

The son, William T. Ames, was educated in the public schools, finishing with graduation from Woodbridge High School, class of 1887. He began business life as messenger with the National Park Bank of New York City, and rose through various promotions to the position of paying teller. In 1906 he organized the First National Bank of Woodbridge, of which he was elected the first president. The First National Bank has been a successful institution from its beginning, and its founding and subsequent success reflect great credit upon Mr. Ames as organizer and executive. He has aided in the development of his town in every legitimate way, and has been a strong factor in the advance Woodbridge has made in recent years.

Mr. Ames served for two terms as member of the Board of Education; was the first president of Sewaren Public Library ; was trustee of the Presbyterian church ; two years a member of the Township Committee; is secretary of Boynton Real Estate Company ; is a director of the Masonic Hall Association ; is affiliated with Americus Lodge, No. 83, Free and Accepted Masons; is a member of the National Republican Club of New York; and of the New York section of the Green Mountain Club. His favorite recreations are walking and motoring. Mr. Ames married, November 24, 1892, Helen Boynton, daughter of C. W. and Eunice Adelia (Harriman) Boynton, both born in New England. Mr. and Mrs. Ames are the parents of a son, Oliver B. Ames, an electrical contractor. The family home is in Sewaren.
 

SAMUEL BARRON BREWSTER, eldest son of George and Eliza Case (Barron) Brewster, was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, March 28, 1872, and was educated in the public schools of that town. After serving as a mercantile clerk for three years, he entered in June, 1898, the grain business, as a member of the firm Cutter & Brewster. About 19o5 he bought his partner's interest and continued alone, under the firm name S. B. Brewster, until 1909. He then admitted his brother, George Frederick Brewster, to a partnership. The business is wholesale and retail dealing in grain, feed, poultry supplies, hay, straw, and kindred lines. The original warehouse location, opposite the Pennsylvania Railroad freight station, was sold to the Woodbridge Lumber Company in 1916, when the Brewster Company moved into the new building which they had erected at the intersection of Main street and the Pennsylvania railroad. This new building, forty feet front and one hundred sixty feet deep, includes warehouse, office and elevator.

Samuel Barron Brewster is a director of the First National Bank of Woodbridge, a trustee of the First Presbyterian Church, a trustee of the Barron Library, member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Royal Arcanum, and the Junior Order United American Mechanics.

Mr. Brewster married, November s 22, 1899, Ada Louise Wagner, daughter of Jacob Wagner, of Plainfield, New Jersey.
Samuel Barron Brewster is descended both on his father's and mother's side from old settlers in Woodbridge township. I-le is the seventh in descent from Nathaniel Brewster, born at Plymouth about 1620. This ancestor was graduated from the first class of Harvard in 1642. For over thirty years he was pastor of a church at Brookhaven, Long Island.

From here, his descendants moved to New Windsor, New York. His great-grandson, Timothy Brewster, came to Woodbridge in 1779, and bought a farm consisting of a large tract of land bordering on Staten Island Sound. This land he bequeathed to his son, George Young Brewster.

George Young Brewster had four sons and" two daughters. His son, Ezra Mundy Brewster, born in 1823, occupied this property until his death in 1896, when his son, Henry D. Brewster, inherited the property. In 1847 he married Letitia V. Brokaw, to whom were born three children : Elizabeth, Henry D., and William. Other children of George Young Brewster were: Catherine, born in 1821 ; Walter, born in 1824, married Rachel Coddington ; Sarah Elizabeth, born in 1826, married Henry N. Demarest in 1845, and their children were: William, David, Charles, and Walter ; Albert, born in 1830; and George.

George Brewster, son of George Young Brewster, married Eliza Case Barron in 1863, and their children are: Sadie Barron ; Amy Stewart, who married Benjamin Lander McNulty, April 28, 1896, and to whom have been born two children: Barron Lander, and Carrell Stewart; Louise; Samuel Barron; and George Frederick, who married Lillian Schatz, of Newark, September 24, 1914.

Eliza Case (Barron) Brewster is descended from Ellis Barron, who came to Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1640, from the county of Waterford, Ireland, where the family were known as the Barons of Burn-church. A grandson of this first Ellis Barron, also named Ellis Barron, came to Woodbridge about 1690. Samuel Barron, father of Eliza Case Barron, was a great-grandson of this Ellis Barron.

Samuel Barron was born in 1801 in the Episcopal Rectory in Woodbridge. This old brick house was built by his grandfather, the first Samuel Barron, about 1750. It is said to be the first house built of brick in New Jersey. Though in business in Mobile for some twenty years, Samuel Barron spent most of his life in the old town, Woodbridge, where he purchased a farm, and where he died in 1870. The old homestead has recently been torn down. Tisdale Terrace and Grove avenue are streets which were originally a part -of the old farm. He married, in 1839, Eliza Ann, daughter of Isaac S. Jaques, of Woodbridge. This lady, born in 1817, is the oldest resident of the township. The children of this union were: Eliza Case, who became the wife of George Brewster, and Sarah Romaine, who married, in 1871, William Henry Cutter, son of Hampton Cutter, who owned valuable clay mines; the children of this union were: Hampton, and Laura Lucas. Sarah Romaine (Barron) Cutter died November 1, 1911. William Henry Cutter died September 27, 1918.
Other descendants of Ellis Barron:

Deacon Joseph Barron, a grandson of Ellis Barron, was a deacon and pillar of the old Presbyterian church when the present church edifice was erected in 1803. In 180o he erected the old Barron homestead on Rahway avenue, Woodbridge, now occupied by Ernest Boynton.

Thomas Barron, son of Deacon Joseph Barron, was born in Woodbridge in 1790, and died in New York in 1875, unmarried. He was the
founder of the Barron Library, completed in 1877. This is a fine memorial building of Belleville brownstone, which very appropriately stands upon a corner of the property which was long known as the Barron homestead.

John Barron, another son of Deacon Joseph Barron, was born in Woodbridge in 1792. He married Mary Conner, of Staten Island. Children of this union were : Frances M., born in 1833, married John Henry Campbell. 2. John C., born in 1837, married, in 1869, Harriot Williams; their children were: Thomas, Mary, Carlisle Norris, and John Conner. 3. Maria Louise, born in 1839, married, in 1857, Charles D. Fredericks; their children are: Alfred DeForest ; Louise Barron, who married Price Warick; Gertrude Virginia, married William Stewart ; parents of two children : Katherine, and Gertrude ; and Barron.

Johanna Barron, born in Woodbridge, in 18oz, was a great-granddaughter of the first Ellis Barron. She married Samuel Warner and had three children : Joseph ; John ; and Johanna, who married Captain Sladden.

John Ellis Larron, born in Woodbridge, in 1806, was another great-grandson of the first Ellis Barron to settle in Woodbridge. He married Mary Potter and their children were: Sarah Ann, who married William Finley; and Julia Potter, now living in Brooklyn.
 

CHARLES H. THORN.—The history of the city of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, would be incomplete without the name of Charles H. Thorn. The Thorn family is a prominent one in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. George W. Thorn, Mr. Thorn's father, was born in that city. He was a well known and highly skilled physician, a man deeply devoted to duty, feeling the greatest sense of responsibility toward his fellowmen. He served his country through the entire period of the Civil War, then returned to his practice in Philadelphia, and died there at the age of seventy years. He married Eliza Dorsey, who was also born in Philadelphia, and now resides in Scranton, Pennsylvania. She was born in September, 1844. They were the parents of three children, all of whom are now living: George, who is a resident of Scranton, and engaged in railroad interests; Charles H., whose name appears at the head of this review; and Amanda, now the wife of Louis Worrick, of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Charles H. Thorn was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, June 18, 1870. He attended school in that city until he was eighteen years of age, then went to work in the coal mines to learn the coal industry, but remained there only three years. He then learned the machinist's trade, and also, while still living in Scranton, the trade of mason and bricklayer. Realizing that the work nearest at hand is not always the work in which a man succeeds best, and feeling confidence ill the practical foundation upon which he could fall back, Mr. Thorn struck out along the line of salesmanship. He traveled for a time, but found the work so much to his liking, and his success so gratifying that he came to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, and established a real estate business. This was in 1903, and Mr. Thorn soon made himself felt in the real estate circles of the rapidly growing city, handling some very interesting deals. For four years, and during the period of the World War, Mr. Thorn gave up his business entirely, and placed his time at the disposal of the United States Government, putting all his energies into the arduous activities on this side which so vitally affected the progress of the war. He was all through the Morgan explosion, serving with the State militia. Mr. Thorn's place of business and residence are at No. 103 Gordon street, Perth Amboy. While deeply interested in public affairs, Mr. Thorn is not a party politician, and always votes for the best man. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is a very busy man, but spends his leisure, whenever possible, in the open air. He is fond of all outdoor sports, particularly camping and fishing.

Mr. Thorn married Ada Randolph, daughter of Edgar and Mary E. (Cole) Randolph. The Randolph family settled in Perth Amboy in the sixteenth century, and have lived in the vicinity ever since. Mr. and Mrs. Thorn's only child, Ada Randolph, was born April 14, 1908. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, although Mr. Thorn was born a Quaker, and his family had been Quakers since old Colonial times.
 

ELDON LEON LOBLEIN—Following in the footsteps of his honored father, Dr. Loblein is a successful veterinarian of New Brunswick, and prominent in its public life. A native son of Middlesex county, he has served a term in the county's legislative body, and has represented his city in the New Jersey House of Assembly. His father, Eldon Leon Loblein, Sr., was born in the Bermudas, West Indio., February 23, 1861, and in 1881 came to the United States, locating at New Brunswick, New Jersey, which was his home until his passing away, March 24, 19to. He was a graduate of the New York Veterinary College (now a department of New York University), receiving his degree in June, 1884. He took an . active part in the public activities of the city, and for twelve years was a member of the Board of Education. For two years he was president of the Veterinary Medical Association of New Jersey, a member of the New Brunswick Club, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He married Emma Hendricks, born in New Brunswick, March zo, z861, where she died, November 26, 1901, leaving an only child, Eldon Leon (2).

Eldon Leon Loblein, Jr., was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, January 13, i888. He was there educated in the public schools, and completed high school courses with the graduating class of igos, then spent two years in Rutgers College. In 1910 he was graduated V. M. D. at the University of Pennsylvania, and the same year began the practice of veterinary medicine and surgery in New Brunswick, his office and residence at No. 177 Livingston avenue, and since his entrance into practice has been associated with Rutgers College, teaching veterinary science in both Rutgers College and Rutgers short courses in agriculture. He has been a member'of the New Jersey Veterinary Association for the past ten years, and during that entire period has been its efficient secretary. Dr. Loblein has built up a good practice and is held. in high esteem, both professionally and as a citizen.

Dr. Loblein has been active in civic affairs for many years, and was chosen in 1914 and 1915 to represent the New Brunswick district in the State Legislature. He served his term with credit, and in 1917 was elected a member of the Middlesex County Board of Freeholders for a term which expired in 1920. In this, the county lawmaking body, all local questions are considered, and the records show that Mr. Loblein has been faithful and efficient in his services. He is a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, the K. 0. K. A. Club, the Young Men's Christian Association, the New Brunswick Boat Club, and the Protestant Episcopal church.

Dr. Loblein married, in New Brunswick, September I, 1910, Helen Mae Oram, born in New Brunswick, daughter of Elmer E. and Margaret (Kibbe) Oram, her father a merchant at the corner of New and Schuyler streets. Dr. and Mrs. Loblein are the parents of three children: Eldon Oram, born May 25, 191t ; Margaret Catherine, born February 24, 1913; and Janet, born August 21, 1916.
 

FRANK R. VALENTINE.—About the middle of the nineteenth century, James Valentine, a Washington market butcher, left his native New York and made a home in Woodbridge, New Jersey. In addition to founding a home and giving to Woodbridge a new family name he founded a business, for he was one of the pioneers in that great Middlesex county industry, the mining of clay and the manufacture of clay products. In the fullness of time, James Valentine passed away, but his able sons, Mulford D. and James R. Valentine, continued the business until they too passed away. But a representative of the third generation was trained for the work, and Frank R. Valentine, son of James R. Valentine, and grandson of James Valentine, is the able executive head of the business conducted under the corporate name, The M. D. Valentine & Brother Company, a name known wherever fire brick are used. The great development of the business came after 1870, under Mulford D. and James R. Valentine, they trading as M. D. Valentine & Brother, and under his honored uncle and father, Frank R. Valentine received the training which so well fits him for the important place he fills in the manufacturing world. He descends from ancient family, tracing to the early Dutch settlement of the valley of the Hudson, and to Revolutionary ancestors.

James Valentine was born in New York City, January 3t, 1808, and in Woodbridge, New Jersey, died August 4, 1891. For many years he was engaged in business in Washington market, New York, a butcher. A considerable part of his life was spent in New York, but in 1843 he closed his interests and moved to Woodbridge, Middlesex county, New Jersey, where he died at the age of eighty-two. In Woodbridge he was a partner with William H: Berry and Alexander Brown in the mining and manufacture of clay, and aided his sons to establish in business for themselves.

His chief business in Woodbridge, however, outside of his clay interest, was caring for his own investments in real estate, !or he prospered both in New York and in Woodbridge, his clay interests developing until the firm of William H. Berry & Company became the leading company in the business, a position they long maintained.

James Valentine married, April 2, 1829, Catherine Ackerman, born in New York, August 8, 1809, died in Woodbridge, New Jersey, April to, 1898. Mrs. Valentine was a daughter of James Ackerman, and a granddaughter of Nathan Wilkinson, who enlisted in the Continental army, February 13, 1776, and continued in the service until November 8, 1782, without asking or receiving any compensation. He was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant and faithfully served liberty's cause. Lieutenant Nathan Wilkinson's daughter, Esther, married James Ackerman, of New York, and their daughter, Catherine, married James Valentine, whose ancestry is traced in New York to the year 1632, when two of the Valentine name came from Holland and settled, one on Long Island, the other in Westchester county, New York, James Valentine tracing from the Westchester county settler. James and Catherine (Ackerman) Valentine were the parents of fourteen children, nine of whom grew to years of maturity: z. Maria E., married Josiah Drake. 2. William, married Martha Coddington. 3. Benjamin, married Mary Eldridge. 4. Robert M., married (first) Deborah Daily, (second) Mary D. Mercer, who still survives him. 5. Mulford D., now deceased, a veteran of the Civil War, and long identified with his brother, James R., in the firm, M. D. Valentine & Brother, manufacturers of fire brick and drain pipe ; he married Rachel D. Camp, who ;'et survives him. 6. James R., of further mention. 7. Howard, married Augusta Warner, who yet survives him. 8. Edwin W., married Emma Harned, both living in 1921. 9. Oscar G., married Marie D. Coley, both living. This was a remarkable family, eight sons, the only daughter, the first born. All of these sons resided in Woodbridge, New Jersey, and the daughter married there. In this review the career of the fifth son, James R., is traced, Mulford D., the fourth son, being also of extended mention in this work.

James R. Valentine, better known as Ross Valentine, was born in New York City, October t, 1845, and died in Woodbridge, New Jersey, June 24, 1919. He was but a child when his parents moved to Woodbridge, New Jersey, the family home at the corner of Perth Amboy avenue and Main street still standing. He was educated in the public schools and Elm Tree Institute, and after school days were over he became associated with his brother, Mulford D. Valentine, they forming the firm, M. D. Valentine & Brother. In 1865 they began the manufacture of bath brick, in 1867 they added drain pipe, and in 1868 fire brick were first made by them. That business they developed to a high degree, the company owning their own clay fields, and operating two plants, one at Valentine Station and one at Woodbridge. Fire brick became the company's chief product and that product M. D. Valentine & Brother shipped to all parts of the United States. Year by year the business increased, the firm attaining leading rank among the fire brick manufacturers of the country. The firm established an unassailable reputation for business integrity and reliability, and the partnership between the brothers begun in 1865 continued until 1911, when it was dissolved by the death of Mulford D. Valentine.

The business was incorporated as The M. D. Valentine & Brother Company, and at the time of his death, in 1919, James R. Valentine was its honored president. He was a man of public spirit, a friend of every forward movement and a good citizen, but averse to holding public office He was a member of the Masonic order, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Royal Arcanum, and the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Sarah A. Anness, who is also deceased, and they were the parents of two children ; Frank R., of further mention; and Mary A., wife of C. R. Brown, of Woodbridge ; they have three children : Victoria A. Brown, J. R. Valentine Brown, and Florence May Brown.

Frank R. Valentine, only son of James R. and Sarah A. (Anness) Valentine, was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, June 8, 1872. He was educated in private and public schools, Military Academy and the Pingry School of Elizabeth, New Jersey. In September, 1891, he entered the office employ of the M. D. Valentine & Brother Company, and later became secretary, and still later treasurer. Upon the death of James R. Valentine, in 1919, he was succeeded by Frank R. Valentine as president and general manager. The business has kept steadily on the increase, the company one of the oldest in the business and one of the most important. The company gave employment to three hundred men at their Woodbridge and Valentine Station plants, but the recent sale of the last named plant reduces the number somewhat.

In addition to the executive management of the M. D. Valentine & Brother Company, Frank R. Valentine is a director of the Perth Amboy Trust Company, Middlesex Title Guarantee and Trust Company, Perth Amboy & Woodbridge Railroad Company, the Seaboard Refractory, New Jersey Manufacturers' Casualty Insurance Company ; vice-president and director of the Didier-March Company, under the Alien Property Custodian ; the New Jersey Clay Miners' Manufacturing Association, of which he is vice-president; also member of the Refractory Manufacturers' Association, and of the National Association of Manufacturers.

His fraternal affiliations are with Americus Lodge, No. 83, Free and Accepted Masons ; New Jersey Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite; Salaam Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; Woodbridge Council, Royal Arcanum ; and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, Raritan Yacht Club, Men's Club, and in religious preference is an Episcopalian. He is intensely public-spirited,, a man of action, deeply interested. in all that concerns the welfare of his town and highly esteemed. Genial, courteous, friendly and considerate, he has 'a host of friends, and most worthily bears a name that has long been an honored one in Woodbridge and in the business world.

Mr. Valentine married, November 19, 1901, Grace E. Ellis, daughter of Hampton C. and Caroline (Van Name) Ellis. Mr. and Mrs. Valentine are the parents of three children: Carolyn, Mildred and Frank R., Jr. The family home in is Woodbridge.


JOHN AUGUSTINE COAN, a native son, has given to South Amboy the strength of manhood, and in her avenues of professional and business opportunity, he has sought and found success. From the date of his admission to the Middlesex county bar, he has practiced law within her borders, and with her business institutions he is intimately connected both professionally and officially. He is a son of Patrick Joseph Coan, born in County Roscommon, Ireland, in October, 1839, and some years after his marriage came to the United States with his wife and two children. That was in 1870, and in bordentown, New Jersey, on the banks of the Delaware he found a home. Soon afterward, however, he located in South Amboy, where, until his death, April 22, 1915, he was in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad. He married Mary Shanagher, born in County Roscommon, in November, 1839, who still survives him in her eighty-second year. They were the parents of six children : Monsignor James J. Coan, rector of Queen of All Saints Roman Catholic Church, • Brooklyn, New York; Mary C., widow of William Birmingham, of South Amboy ; Elizabeth A., wife of James F. McGuire, of Perth Amboy ; Patrick J., of South Amboy; John A., of further mention ; Francis P., a lawyer, now city attorney for the city of South Amboy.

John Augustine Coan was born in South Amboy, New Jersey, November 29, 1877. He attended the public and parochial schools, finishing with graduation from St. Mary's Parochial School in 1894, then passed to Seton Hall, South Orange, New Jersey, whence he was graduated A. B., class of 1898, A. M. 1900. During the years 1898-1900, he was also a student at the New York Law School, and in 1900 he received his LL. B. from that institution, that degree and his A. M. from Seton Hall being conferred at about the same time. He was admitted to the New Jersey bar in June, is000, and at once began practice in South Amboy. The two decades which have since elapsed have brought him the honors and emoluments with which his profession rewards her capable sons, and he also has the confidence and respect of his fellowmen, who have watched his career since boyhood. In addition to his private practice, he was assistant prosecutor of the pleas and is now solicitor for the Star Building and Loan Association of South Amboy, one of the largest and most prosperous associations of its class in the State.

A Democrat in politics, Mr. Coan served his city on the Board of Education in 1910-1911, and from 1910 to 1914, was also county solicitor of Middlesex county. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus; the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and a trustee of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church. He has confined himself closely to professional duty, but upon the organization of the South•Amboy Trust Company, in 1919, he became a member of the board of directors and first vice-president. During the World War period, 1917-1918, he was very active and helpful, serving as local chairman of the Liberty Loan Committee from the first to the final Victory Loan.

Mr. Coan married, in South Amboy, June 27, 1936, Nellie A. Sullivan,' born there, August 24, 1878, daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Nagle) Sullivan, her father deceased, dying at Vie age of eighty-five, her mother yet living, aged eighty. Mr. and Mrs. Coan are the parents of five children: Mary Cecilia, born April 9, 1907; Catherine Marita, born April 14, 1909; Helen Agnes, born March Jo, 1911; John, born May 27, 1912 ; James, born July 16, 1914. Every man has a hobby, but Mr. Coan has two, baseball and automobiling.
 

HON. JOHN FEE.—There is now and then a man who after he has passed away lives in the minds of many, not only by reason of results accomplished, but also in consequence of a singularly forceful personality. So survives the memory of the late Hon. John Fee, who at the time of his death was mayor of South River, New Jersey.

John Fee was born in Sayreville, New Jersey, March 27, 1861, the son of John and Alice (Ranahan) Fee. His education was obtained in the schools of his native place. For many years previous to his death he was engaged in the wholesale liquor business, which enterprise brought him substantial profit. He ever manifested that lively interest in everything relating to the public welfare, which was his dominant characteristic, and a capacity for friendship wls a gift which he possessed in combination with fine business abilities. A Democrat in politics, he was always active in local public affairs and served his home town in many capacities. He was councilman a number of terms, and mayor for six terms, holding this office at the time of his death, October 24, 1917. Mr. Fee was also a member of the Board of Freeholders for many years. In religion he was a Roman Catholic, and his fraternal affiliation was with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

On October 3, 1892,•the Hon. John Fee was united in marriage with Cora F. Mackey, daughter of Lewis and Mary E. (Dyckman) Mackey, and they had issue: Cora Alice, born June 23, 1893; Florence Elizabeth, born February 3, 1895; Augusta Catherine, born May 5, 1897; John Mackey, born December 11, 1899; Helen Mary, born November 13, 1901 ; Matthew James, born April 28, 1905.

From the foregoing outline, brief and imperfect as it necessarily is, it is easily understood that John Fee was a man of no ordinary ability as an executant, and also that he was endowed with breadth of view and liberality of sentiment. He had a rare capacity for friendship, and upon his death was mourned by men of every class in the community and followed by the blessings of many to whom he had been a friend in time of need. The crowning blessing of his years was his union with a woman who was his inspirer and helper and the presiding genius of his fireside.
 

FRANZ ROESSLER, a prominent figure among the successful citizens of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where he has been engaged in business as a manufacturing chemist for many years, as head of the great Roessler and Hasslacher Chemical Company, is a native of Frankforton-Main, Germany, born December 6, 1856, a son of Fritz and Maria (Andreae) Roessler. His parents were well known in the city of Frankfort, his father holding the responsible post of director of the mint, for a number of years.

Franz Roessler was the recipient of an unusually fine education during his childhood and youth. He attended as a boy the volke-schule or public schools of his native city, where he was well grounded in general education, and upon graduation from these institutions entered the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Still later he became a student at the School of Mines at Freiberg, Saxony, where he specialized in courses bearing upon chemistry and its application to the arts and industry. In the year 1882 he came to the United States and engaged in business as a manufacturing chemist at Perth Amboy, New Jersey. The Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Company of that city is in a large measure his work, and its great and rapid development which makes it to-day the largest concern of its kind not only in the State but probably also in the country, bears testimony to his great skill as a chemist and not less so his remarkable organizing and executive ability in the business world. Mr: Roessler has always taken a keen interest and an active part in the material growth of the city of his adoption, and is to-day associated with a number of its most important financial institutions, among which should be mentioned the First National Bank of Perth Amboy and the Perth Amboy Trust Company. He is also conspicuous in the social circles and club life of New Jersey and New York, and is a member of the East Jersey Club, the New York Athletic Club, the Chemists' Club, and the Drug and Chemical Club, all of New York City. Mr. Roessler is to-day in the prime of his mental and physical powers, and as the active head of the great concern which he has built up plays an important part in the affairs of the community. His unusual abilities make him a leader among his associates, and he may claim to his credit the establishment of a concern founded upon so broad and firm a basis that it not only today dominates the chemical industry in this part of the world, but seems assured of a similarly important place in the future, guided, as it is surely safe to predict, for many years to come by his resourceful and conservative intellect. A great past and a great present has already been achieved by him for the Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Company, and an even greater future seems not less certain.

Franz Roessler was united in marriage, May ti, 189o, with Elizabeth Kuchler, a daughter of George and Betty (Stein) Kuchler, old and highly respected residents of that place. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Roessler, as follows: Maria, born 1892; Hans, born 1894; Fritz, born 1896; Anna, born 1898; Lillie, born t9oo ; and a child, born 19o2.
 

JOHN LAZIER MacDOWALL, M. D., a specialist in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and one of the leading members of the medical profession in Middlesex county, New Jersey, with offices at the corner of Market and State streets, Perth Amboy, is a member of one of the oldest American families, an ancestor of his being Mary Chilton, who came to the New World on the "Mayflower" to seek religious liberty, and the first woman to step from the vessel onto the seemingly inhospitable shore. The MacDowalls later removed to Canada and became prominent in the life of that country, a great-grandfather of Dr. MacDowall having been a united Empire loyalist and one of the founders of Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario. This Robert James MacDowall was a man of strong religious convictions and played a considerable part in the affairs of Upper Canada, where he founded the Presbyterian church.

Dr. MacDowall's father, another Robert James MacDowall, was a lifelong resident of Kingston, Ontario, and was there engaged in business as an importer of musical instruments. He married Elda Lucinda Lazier, a descendant of Jacobus Lazier, a French Huguenot, who escaped from France during the Huguenot massacres, and they were the parents of five children, as follows : Ethel, who became the wife of W. L. McFarland; Etta, who became the wife of Dr. J. J. Robertson ; John Lazier, with whom we are here concerned ; Robert; and Elda.

Dr. John L. MacDowall was born August 29, 1878, in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, and as a lad attended the public schools of that city. After completing his studies at these institutions, he became a student in the Kingston Collegiate Institute and graduated from there in 1896 after completing his preparation for a college course. He then matriculated in Queen's University, Kingston, of which his great-grandfather had been one of the founders, and there took the classical course, graduating with the degree of A. B. in two. He had determined to follow medicine as a profession in the meantime, and at once entered the Medical School of the same university and received his medical degree in 1903. He then came to New York City and took a post-graduate course in the Manhattan Eye 'and Ear Hospital in 1904 and 19o5. After his graduation from the last named institution, Dr. MacDowall came directly to Perth Amboy, where he has since practiced. He has been attended with a high degree of success from the outset and is now recognized as an authority in his chosen branch of medicine. Besides his private practice he holds thg post of assistant surgeon of the Manhattan Eye and Ear Hospital and is opthalmologist in the Perth Amboy City Hospital. Dr. MacDowall has always interested himself in the general life of his adopted community, and is affiliated with a number of clubs and other organizations in Perth Amboy and elsewhere. He is a member of the Middlesex County Medical Society, the New Jersey State Medical Society, the American .Medical Association, the New York Medico Surgical Society, the Friars Club of New York City, the Canadian Club of New York City, the Colonial Country Club, the East Jersey Club, the Raritan Yacht Club and the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. He is, like his forbears, a Presbyterian in religious belief, and attends the church of that denomination in Perth Amboy. He is particularly fond of outdoor pastimes and spends his somewhat rare vacations fishing and hunting. He is also a member of the local lodges of the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.
 

RAYMOND DeWITT HOWELL fills a responsible executive position in the business world of Perth Amboy, New Jersey.
The family is one long resident in the State; and • William Nayler Howell, Mr. Howell's father, was born in Kinkora, Mercer county, New
Jersey, April 28, 1849. He is still actively engaged as a calker with the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company. He has lived in this city for thirty-two years. He married Mary E. Fowler, who was born in Leipsic, Delaware, and is still living. They are the parents of three children : Mrs. H. Rankin, of Perth Amboy; Captain Charles F. Howell, of the United States navy; add Raymond DeWitt Howell. This is the sixth generation in America, the family coming originally from Wales.

Raymond DeWitt Howell was born in Perth Amboy, September 26, 1892. He received his education in the public and high schools of the city; then at the age of fifteen years he entered an insurance office in New York City. He remained for only a short time, however, then returned to Perth Amboy and secured a position with the Perth Amboy Hardware Company as office boy. He quickly gained the confidence of his employers and rose steadily. He was first promoted to clerk, and in 1917 made manager of the retail department. He is now manager of the business and assistant secretary of the company. Mr. Howell is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; of the Junior Order of Mechanics; of the Royal Arcanum; and is also a member of the Junior Club; the Metropolitan Club of New York City, of which he is secretary and treasurer; and the Twentieth Century Club. He is well known in military circles, having held a commission in the Home Guards, New Jersey Militia Reserve. He is fond of all outdoor sports, being particularly interested in baseball.

Mr. Howell married, March is, 1914, Petrea J. Stoier, who was born in Perth Amboy. Her parents, Hans and Elsie Stoier, both lived and died in this city. Mr. and Mrs. Howell have two children : Ruth, born May 15, 1915 ; and Janet Petrea, born May 28, 1920. The family are members of the Simpson Methodist Episcopal Church, and active in all its work.
 

SCHUYLER C. VAN CLEEF.—Following in the footsteps of his father, James H. Van Cleef, lawyer, Assemblyman and State Senator, Schuyler C. Van Cleef prepared for the profession of law,• and since 1898 has practiced at the Middlesex county bar, as did his father. He has also served in the State Legislature, and has advanced far along the road to success. He is of excellent and honorable Dutch ancestry, a man thoroughly liked and respected.

The Van Cleefs of Middlesex county descend from Holland ancestors, the first to come to this country being Jans Van Cleef, who came over in 1659, settling at New Utrecht, Long Island. He was born in Holland, • in 1628, and prior to 1661 married Enjelye Lowerins, the line of descent being through the youngest of their eight children, Cornelius Van Cleef, and his wife, Frementje Van De Water; their son, Laurens, who settled in New Jersey, married and had a son, Isaac, born in 1742. Isaac Van Cleef married, in 1769, Dorcas Prunyea, born April 13, 1749, died March 28, 1812. Isaac Van Cleef died June 30, 1804. They were the parents of eleven children, including a son, Abraham, great-grandfather of Schuyler C. Van Cleef, of New Brunswick, of whom further.

Abraham Van Cleef was born July 3, 1785, died March 7, 1870.. His son, Peter A. Van Cleef, married Eliza Hutchings, of New Brunswick, New Jersey, and died in 1884, his wife dying the same year. They were the parents of an only child, James H. Van Cleef, of whom further.

James H. Van Cleef was born at Branchville, Sussex county, New Jersey, July 12, 1841. He was an attorney and counsellor-at-law, practicing in New Brunswick. He was prominent in public life, serving his county and State as both Assemblyman and State Senator. He married Ellis S. Clark, and they were the parents of Schuyler C. Van Cleef, of whom further.
Schuyler C. Van Cleef was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, November 13, 1878. He was educated in the public schools, Rutgers Preparatory School, and Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute. He studied law under his eminent father, and on February 21, 1898, was admitted to the New Jersey bar as an attorney, and on February 21, 1907, as a counsellor. He has practiced law in New Brunswick very successfully during the years which have since intervened, and ranks high at the Middlesex bar. In 1908 he was elected a member of the New Jersey Legislature.

Mr. Van Cleef married Annie Keeler, and they are the parents of three children, as follows: Helena Schuyler, James H., and Ann.
 

FORREST LEIGH SMITH, B. S., C. E.—A peculiar interest attaches to the men behind any achievement. The workmen are in evidence during the constructive period, and the completed work adds to the convenience or safety of the public, but who, looking beyond the obvious, would not delight in touching hands with the man in whose brain the achievement first had birth, and who planned to the smallest detail the successive steps by which the work was accomplished? Forrest Leigh Smith, of Mason & Smith, civil engineers, is a span whose career is being .watched with the keenest interest by his friends, because he is the man behind much of the important construction work in this section.

Mr. Smith's father, James Augustus Smith, was born in Flemington, New Jersey, and has been a resident of Perth Amboy since 1874. He is a prominent merchant in that city. He married Elizabeth Noe, who was born in Perth Amboy, and still lives there, at the age of sixty-six. They were the parents of six children : Marion, who died in infancy; Forrest Leigh, of this review; Mabel Noe, the wife of William Gicking, of Hazleton, Pennsylvania ; Ethel, who lives at home; James Earl, who also lives at home; and Pearl, twin of the last named, who died at birth.

Forrest Leigh Smith was born in Perth Amboy, January 2o, 1880. He attended the schools of that city, and was graduated from the Perth Amboy High School in 1897. He then took a course at Wood's Business College, then a year at Rutgers College, 1898-18w, being made an associate member in 1907, and from 19I1 to•Igts took a course at Cooper Union, New York, attending night classes and graduating with degrees of B. S. and C. E., receiving the former in nit and the latter in 1915. All this time he was carrying on his business in Perth Amboy, having in 1904 formed a partnership with S. J. Mason, of Perth Amboy, under the name of Mason & Smith, civil engineers. For the past seventeen years they have continued this association of interests, and have handled some of the most interesting work in this region.

Mr. Smith was city engineer in 1905, 1906 and 1907; and township engineer for Woodbridge township for eight years. He is an associate member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and is a member of the alumni societies of Rutgers and Cooper Union, and was at one time president of the' Perth Amboy High School Alumni Association. His favorite relaxation is in outdoor sports; he ran on the 'Varsity team at Rutgers, and has often played on the local football team. He is a member of the Raritan Yacht Club. He is also a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and was at one time esteemed loyal knight.

Mr. Smith married Jeannette Schade, daughter of Nickolas and Anna (George) Schade. Mr. Schade, who is now deceased, was a veteran of the Civil War, but Mrs. Schade is now living with her daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the parents of three children : Marvin Schade, born in 1905; Leonore, born in 1907; and Arnold, born in 1916. The family are members of the Presbyterian church.
 

JAMES LOGAN CLEVENGER, numbered among the residents of Perth Amboy, is vice-president of the Perth Amboy Evening News Company, and editor of the Perth Amboy "Evening News."

John Anthony Clevenger, father of James Logan Clevenger, is a direct descendant of the family by this name who came over from England and were members of the William Penn Colony in West Jersey. He was born in Beverly, New Jersey, September To, 1841, and now resides in Hightstown, New Jersey. He was a farmer and later entered the railroad mail service, where he served for forty years, having been appointed by President Chester A. Arthur. He married Julia Gaskill, a native of Mount Holly, and by this marriage became the father of two children : Mrs. Grace C. Ashton, of Hightstown, New Jersey ; James Logan, of further mention.

James Logan (J. Logan) Clevenger, son of John Anthony and Julia (Gaskill) Clevenger, was born on a farm near Mount Holly, Burlington county, New Jersey, February 13, 1879. He was brought by his parents to the town of South Amboy when he was but five years of age, and lived there for nine years and there attended school. In 1891 the family moved to Hightstown, where his parents have ever since resided, and here he attended the Peddle Institute, from which he was graduated in 1896, supplementing this with one year at Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in the private secretarial course, in 1897. He then entered the law office of his uncle, Joseph H. Gaskill, at Camden, New Jersey, and at the end of one year was employed as a reporter on the Asbury Park "Journal" for the summer season, becoming a reporter on the Perth Amboy "Chronicle" in the fall of 1899, and in i9o1 with the Newark "Evening News." In 1903, with two others, he bought the Perth Amboy "Republican," which name was changed to the Perth Amboy "Evening News." Mr. Clevenger is director of the Perth Amboy Trust Company. In all matters relative to the welfare of the community in which he lives he has ever manifested a deep interest, aiding always to the utmost of his power any movement which tends to further public progress or good government. He affiliates with St. Peter's Episcopal Church and is a member of the vestry. His clubs are the East Jersey, Raritan Yacht, and Colonia Country, and his hobby is golf.

Mr. Clevenger married, October 6, 1902, Jane Liddell Farroat, daughter of the late Isaac and Martha Adelia Farroat, of Perth Amboy. Mr. and Mrs. Clevenger have three children : James Logan, Jr., born June 22, 1904; Ruth, born July I, 1907; John Burr, born October 1, 1917.
 

JOHN FRANCIS WEBER, M. D.—Dr. Weber was one of the patriotic physicians of the county who forsook a private professional career to serve his country in her, need, and in camp and hospital, on transport and battlefield, risked contagion and death for the sick and dying. The story of what the medical corps of the American army did at home and abroad for their own, their allies, and even their enemies, may never he told in full, but should it be told even in part, it will form the brightest page in all medical history. Nor should the non-professional men of the medical and hospital corps, nor the nurses be overlooked when self-sacrifice and devotion are the themes under discussion, for they worked, suffered, and went down into every depth of human woe that the professionals did. To men like Dr. Weber, America owes a huge debt of gratitude, the only payment they ask for their sacrifice.

John Francis Weber, son of William A. and Emma- H. Weber, was born at Florence, Burlington county, New Jersey, January 21, 1889, his father a merchant. He attended Florence public schools until graduated from grammar school in 1903, then was a student in Asbury Park High School during the school year 1904-05. He then entered Blight Preparatory School, finishing with the graduating class of 19o8. Choosing the profession of medicine, he entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, whence he was graduated M. D., class of 1913. The following year was spent as interne at Howard and Chestnut Hill hospitals, his private practice beginning at South Amboy, New Jersey, in 1914, and continuing until January 31, 1918. He then entered the military service of the United States in the medical corps, continuing until honorably discharged with the rank of captain, July 3, '919. On August I, 1919, he resumed private practice in South Amboy and there, where so well known, he is most highly appreciated both as physician and citizen.
Dr. Weber's military career began with his enlistment in the medical corps and his appointment to the rank of first lieutenant at the Army Medical School at Washington, D. C., which he attended from February to March 15, 1918. From March 16 to May to, 1918,1e was on duty at Field 'Jo. t, Aviation General Supply Department, Garden City, Long Island, going to Camp Dix, New Jersey, where his service covered the period from May 11 to May 19; 1918. He was assigned to the 311th Regiment of Infantry, 78th Division, and with that organization sailed from the Bush Terminal in Brooklyn, May 19, 1918. They landed in Liverpool, England, May 31st, following, and on June 1st sailed for Folkstone, England, landing in Calais, France, the same day. He served with the American Expeditionary Force in France until May to, 1919, when he sailed from Bordeaux, France, arriving in Hoboken, New Jersey, May 26, 1919. The command was taken at once to Camp Merritt, leaving there June 3rd for Camp Dix, where Dr. Weber received honorable discharge, July 3, 1919, having left that camp just one year, one month and fotirteen days earlier.

The nature and value of the service Dr. Weber rendered may be surmised from the military records. He was promoted to the rank of captain, February 14, 1919, and received from his own country the Distinguished Service Cross, and from France the Croix de Guerre.
Dr. Weber is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, the Masonic order, and Phi Alpha Sigma, the latter a medical fraternity.
Dr. Weber married, October 21, 1916, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Rebecca Duval, daughter of George and Madeline S. Duval. Dr. and Mrs. Weber are the parents of two children : William Duval, born August 29, 1917; and Dorothy Louise, born December 5, 1918.
 

JOHN FRANCIS SEAMAN, a native son, when qualified to practice law, began in Perth •Amboy, and although his war service delayed his beginning practice, he has accomplished a great deal and is winning his way toward success. He is a son of John Seaman, born in Austria-Hungary, as it once existed, and at about seventeen years of age came to the United States, settling in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He now owns and conducts a grocery store there, at No. 52o State street, and is a substantial citizen, formerly an excise commissioner. John Seaman married Anna Kmetz, and they are the parents of five children, all living in Perth Amboy : Joseph A., a grocer, in business at No. 475 Penn street; Mary E., married George A. Kozusko ; John Francis, of further mention; Helen N., residing with her parents; and William G., a schoolboy.

John Francis Seaman was born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, March 1, 1895. He finished grammar school courses in the public school in 1910, then was a student at Seton Hall Preparatory School until 1914, going thence to the New York Law School, whence he was graduated LL. B., class of 1917. In February, 1918, he entered the United States army, and for ten months was on duty at Camp Dix, the first four months with Company K, 311th Infantry, 78th Division. He was then transferred to Company 9, 3rd Battalion, 153rd Depot Brigade, for six months. He was mustered out with an honorable discharge, December 3, 1918. He began law practice in Perth Amboy in November, 1920. Mr. Seaman is a member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church and the Knights of Columbus. He is a devotee of all out-of-door athletic sports, baseball and football especially, with basketball a favorite indoor sport.

Mr. Seaman married, at Camp Dix, September 3, 1918, Catherine Alice Campbell, born in Perth Amboy, February 22, 1900, daughter of James E. and Ellen (Sullivan) Campbell, her father a Lehigh Valley Railroad conductor.


ABEL F. RANDOLPH.—Members of the Randolph family have long been located in New Jersey, and in both Union and Middlesex counties have been prominent in business, in agriculture and in the professions. During the last twenty years of his useful life, Abel F. Randolph was a lumber dealer of Metuchen, there conducting a prosperous business and acquiring a competence. In 188o he built a handsome residence in Metuchen, and there his widow, Mrs. Margaret E. Randolph, yet resides. he was a son of Samuel and Mary (Boyce) Randolph, his father a farmer, and at the time of the bi:th (If his son, Abel F., resided at Plainfield, Union county, New Jersey.
Abel F. Randolph was born at Plainfield, New Jersey, February 24, 1834, and died in Metuchen, New Jersey, in July, 1912. He was educated in the public schools, and although the son of a farmer, he did not take kindly to farm life and when free to make his own choice of an occupation he chose a mercantile life. He was variously engaged with different firms, finally becoming so well qualified that he established in the lumber business with Manning Freeman. He remained in the lumber business until his death, which, as before stated, covered a period of twenty years. He was an able business man, a good manager, and one whom all respected for his upright life and sterling character. In politics he was an Independent ; and he attended services at the Methodist Episcopal church.

Mr. Randolph married, in Metuchen, December 20, 1856, Margaret E. Guernsey, born July 25, 1836, in Connecticut, daughter of Asa B. and Sarah A. (Canfield) Guernsey. Mr. and Mrs. Randolph were the parents of twelve children : Juliett, Joseph, Charles, George John, Nathan, Edwin, Harry, Jane, Jeannette, Ella, Nellie, and William. Mrs. Randolph attends the Methodist Episcopal church, as did her husband.
 

GEORGE JULIUS MILLER, numbered among the young professional men of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, gives promise of a brilliant future. Persuasive as an advocate, clear and forceful in argument, and an all-round, whole-hearted American, his friends are watching his rise in his profession with the greatest interest.

He is a son of Julius and Lena Miller, his father being a prominent merchant in Perth Amboy, where he has conducted a furniture business for the past twenty years.

George J. Miller was born in Perth Amboy, on January 15, 1895. When five years of age he entered the public schools of the city, and was ready for high school at the age of thirteen. Entering high school in 1908, he was graduated in 1912 (a class from which seven graduates have entered the legal profession), and that fall began a course at the New Jersey Law School, which ended with his graduation in 1915. He was a facile student, and possessed a retentive mind. During all his high school and law studies he assisted his father in the store many hours while out of school. He entered upon the practice of law in 1916, only to awaken, in July of the following year, to the great need of his country for men to do war service. He enlisted as a private, on July 15, 1917, was promoted to sergeant-major, Coast Artillery Corps, on December 16, 1917, and on March 20, 1918, he was made army field clerk at the general headquarters of the American Expeditionary Forces, with the Chief of Artillery, where he was serving at the time. He reentered the practice of law upon his discharge from the army on June 16, 1919. He became a counsellor at law and master in chancery in December, 1919, passing both examinations the first time he took them. This is a record in which the young attorney's townspeople take a very natural pride. He married Bertha Francis Sarokin on January 15, 1921.

Mr. Miller acknowledges two hobbies—public speaking, and, in close alliance, books. He is a member of the Young Men's Hebrew Association, and of the Zionists. His religious convictions are those of the Jewish Orthodox. In political affiliation he is a Republican.
 

FRITZ WILLIAM HOYLER, works manager of Plant No. 1, of the Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Company of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, has been well known in business and industrial circles of the city for above two decades, and has always been regarded by his fellow-townsmen as an enlightened and public-spirited citizen. He is a native of France, born in the city, of Paris, May 3, 1869, a son of John Martin and Sophie (Jocher) Hoyler, *who were then residing in that city. The elder Mr. Hoyler was born in Stuttgart, Germany, and his wife in the same place. They were the parents of ten children, of whom only one is now living, Fritz William.

When their son, Fritz William Hoyler, was yet a small child the elder Mr. Hoyler returned ,to Germany and settled in the city of Frankfort, and it was there that the lad was reared to manhood and received his education. He attended first the local volkschule or public school, and upon completing his studies at this institution entered a private chemical laboratory and took up the study or chemistry. He eventually engaged in the assaying business in Frankfort and continued thus occupied until November 15, 1889, on which date he sailed for the United States. Upon reaching this country, he at once entered the employ of the Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Company, of Perth Amboy, as an analytical chemist and thus established an association that has ever since continued. In 1910 he was appointed works manager, the office that he holds at the present time, discharging the responsible duties of that post with the highest degree of efficiency and making himself one of the most valued members of the company's organization. Mr. Hoyler is also interested in the general affairs of the community in which he has elected to reside and has taken a conspicuous part in them. From 1909 to 1914 he held the office of commissioner of the Perth Amboy Library, and has done much to develop that institution and increase its value to the city and extend the scope of its work. Mr. Hoyler is an Independent in politics, and in this displays his characteristic independence of mind, preferring to exercise his own best judgment on all matters of public interest with freedom rather than be in any degree bound by partisan considerations. He is a well known figure in social and fraternal circles in the city, and is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and a trustee of that order. From early youth Mr. Hoyler has taken great pleasure in athletics of all kinds, especially such sports and pastimes as are carried on out-of-doors. As a young man he played football a great deal, but more recently has sought his recreation in. automobiling, of which he is very fond and does considerable motoring in various parts of the country. He also takes plenty of exercise in bowling.

Fritz William Hoyler was united in marriage, March 21, 19o0, with Lena F. Schopper, a native of New York City, a daughter of Theodore and Antoinette (Most) Schopper, of that place, where the former is a retired business man of prominence. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hoyler, Helen Louise, born January 26, 1901, who resides in Perth Amboy with her parents.

ELMER HAROLD EULNER, M. D.—Dr. Eulner began his career as a private practitioner of medicine in South Amboy, in September, 1908, and has steadily grown in public estimation as a skilled and honorable physician. He has also taken an active part in South Amboy's business development and in her civic affairs, particularly so in the health department, for he preaches prevention of disease and puts the doctrine into practical execution through the medium of the city Board of Health, of which he was at one time; president. He is of an Essex county, New Jersey, family, son of Herman Eulner, who was born in Newark, December 31, 1854. His mother, Emma Kiesele, was born in Newark, February 6, 1856, and their son, Elmer H., was born in that city. In 1884, three years after the birth of their son, Herman and Emma (Kiesele) Eulner moved to South River, Middlesex county, New Jersey, where both are yet living; he retired from business cares after a successful career as a merchant. They have three living children: Herman (2), of South River, who succeeded his father in the butcher business, and continues at the same location on Washington street ; Elmer Harold, of further mention ; Lillian, wife of John Rice, of New Brunswick.

Dr. Eulner is a grandson of Simon Eulner, who came to the United States from Germany and located at Lyons Farms, then on the outskirts of Newark, New Jersey, but since incorporated within the city limits. There Simon Eulner farmed and operated a distillery. He is credited with having conceived and built the first incubator for hatching chickens ever put into practical use. It was at the farm in Newark that Herman Eulner, father of Dr. Eulner, was born.

Elmer Harold Eulner was born in Newark, New Jersey, April 1, 1881, and there the first three years of his life were passed. In 1884 his parents moved to South River, •New Jersey, and there the lad attended public school and also received private instruction. After completing his school years, he taught for five years in the public schools, entering Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, at the end of his teaching experiences. He was graduated M. D. from Jefferson, class of 1907, then spent a year as interne at St. Barnabas' Hospital, Newark. In September, 1908, he located in South Amboy, New Jersey, and there he has attained a very satisfactory practice in medicine and surgery.

Dr. Eulner has other business interests of importance. He is president of the Wessco Realty Company, of South Amboy; president of the Galbourne Land Company, of Middlesex county (a company dealing principally in Florida lands) ; and is interested in the Morgan Beach Realty Company and other business corporations of South Amboy and South River. During the years 1912-14, he was president of the South Amboy Board of Health ; is now on the staff of the South Amboy Hospital; a member of the New Jersey State and Middlesex County Medical societies; the Masonic order; Knights of Pythias; and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. He is a communicant of the Episcopal church. Boating, fishing and hunting are his favorite sports, and these he frequently and thoroughly enjoys.

Dr. Eulner married, at South River, New Jersey, June 3o, 1909, Katherine French, born there October 12, 1886, daughter of Abial and Sarah Maria (Wright) French, her father now living at South River, retired, her mother deceased. Dr. and Mrs. Eulner are the parents of two children: Elmer Treganowan, born September 18, 191o; and Katherine, born August 6, rm.
 

RICHARD JOSEPH GALVIN.—In both City Council and State Legislature, Mr. Galvin has served his city well, and he is one of the men whose support has aided all movements for the good of the community in which he lives. Richard Joseph Galvin is a son of Richard Joseph Galvin, who was born in Ireland, and came to the United States with his brothers John and William Galvin, and located at Elizabethport, New Jersey, where they were employed at the coal shipping docks. Richard Joseph, the father of Richard Joseph of this review, married Elizabeth Catherine Lyons, who was born in Ireland, and died at the age of thirty-five. His widow, yet surviving him (1920), is a resident of Perth Amboy. They were the parents of seven children: Johanna, now widow of Patrick Hurley; Catherine, deceased wife of John Kelly; Abbie, married William Rigby, of- Roselle, New Jersey ; Mary, married H. C. Reilly, of Perth Ambo, Patrick, deceased ; John, deceased ; Richard Joseph (2), of further mention.

Richard Joseph (2) Galvin, youngest of the children of Richard Joseph and Elizabeth Catherine (Lyons) Galvin, was born in Elizabeth-port, New Jersey, May 4, 1874, and there the first two years of his life were passed. The family moved to Perth Amboy in 1876, and there the lad, Richard J., attended Public School No. r, and St. Mary's Parochial School, finishing with graduation from St. Mary's, class of 1886. For fifteen years after leaving school, he was in the employ of Kelly & McAlinden, hardware dealers of Perth Amboy, then was with the New York Heating and Ventilating Company, of New York City, for one year. On March 1903, he began the plumbing business at his present address, No. 386 State street, Perth Amboy, and has since been engaged there in the business. He is also president of the Richard J. Galvin Developing Company, with headquarters at No. 215 Broad street, Elizabeth, New Jersey. A good business man, Mr. Galvin has won success fairly and honorably, and, in the close competition of twentieth century business life, he has won honorable mention.

A Democrat in politics, Mr. Galvin has for four terms represented the Third Ward of Perth Amboy on the city Board of Aldermen, and for one term represented his district in the New Jersey Legislature as assemblyman. During the World War, he was enrolled in the State Military Reserve. He is a charter member of Perth Amboy Lodge, Knights of Columbus; a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and a communicant of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church.

He married, in Perth Amboy, Rose Martin, born there, daughter of James and Julia (Cushing) Martin, both deceased, her father an engineer. Mr. and Mrs. Galvin are the parents of three children: Loretta, Rose and Catherine.
 

REV. ARTHUR LOUIS KREYLING.—Although he is a comparatively recent comer to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, the Rev. Arthur Louis Kreyling has already made an important place for himself in the religious life of the community and gained the esteem and affection of his congregation as pastor of the Lutheran Church of Our Saviour in that city. Mr. Kreyling is a native of St. Louis, Missouri, where his birth occurred, July 18, 1889, and a son of Christian and Bertha (Bentel) Kreyling, old and highly respected residents of that place, the former having been successfully engaged in business there as a caterer for a number of years.

The childhood of Arthur L. Kreyling was passed in the city of his birth, and he there attended the parochial school of the Mount Calvary English Lutheran Church until his graduation in June, 1902. He had  been prepared for college at that institution, and in September of the same year matriculated at St. John's College. There he took the classical course mid graduated with the degree of B. A. in 1908. The young man had by that time definitely determined upon entering the ministry of the Lutheran church, and with this end in view, matriculated at the Concordia Lutheran Theological Seminary at St. Louis, in September, 1908. He pursued his studies in divinity at that institution until he was graduated therefrom with the class of Isom He was regularly ordained into the ministry July 2, 191 1, and was sent to do missionary work at Chickasha, Oklahoma, remaining at that post until November, 1914. In December of the same year Mr. Kreyling was called to the Immanuel Lutheran Church of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and remained in charge of that church until the entrance of the United States into the World War. Mr. Kreyling was prompt to offer his services to the government, and was shortly after appointed camp pastor for the Lutheran church at Camp Meade and for eight camps in the Baltimore district. His war services continued from December, 1917, until June, 1919, when he received his honorable discharge. It was in August, 1919, that Mr. Kreyling came to Perth Amboy, whither he had been called to take the pastorate of the Lutheran Church of Our Saviour, a post which he continues to occupy. In the brief space of time that he has been in charge of his present church, Mr. Kreyling has proven himself a most active and devoted clergyman and has done much to organize the work of the parish.

Arthur Louis Kreyling was united in marriage at St. Louis, Missouri, with Florence Stephanie Tacke, a daughter of Charles William and Emma Kathryn (Schenck) Tacke of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Kreyling are the parents of three children, as follows: Dorothy Lillian, born July, 1914; Arthur Ralph, born January 10, 1916; and Ruth Adele, born November 14, 1917.
 

DR. HARRY WILLARD McDONALD, JR.—As an exceptionally able chiropractor, Dr. Henry Willard McDonald, Jr., has attained prestige in the practice of his profession, his success having come as the logical sequence of thorough technical information, as enforced by natural predilection and that sympathy and tact which are the enviable concomitants of precedence in professional life.
Harry Willard McDonald, Sr., father of Dr. Harry W. McDonald, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of Andrew McDonald, who brought his family to this country when he was a young man. Andrew McDonald took an active part in both the Mexican and Civil wars. He died in Pittsburgh, at the age of eighty-six years. Harry Willard McDonald, Sr., now lives retired in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where for many years he was president of the Pittsburgh Real Estate Exchange. He married Margaret Thompson, of Ballyhaise, Ireland, and they are the parents of one child, Harry Willard, Jr., mentioned below.

Harry Willard McDonald, Jr., was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 8, 1886. His preliminary education was obtained in the public schools of his native place and the Allegheny High School, graduating from the latter in 1904. He then went to Fresno, California, where he lived on a ranch for three years, after which he traveled through the southern part of Mexico and then through Canada on account of ill health. In 1911 he returned to his native city, Pittsburgh, and having decided to become a chiropractor, he entered the Central College of Chiropractic at Pittsburgh, from which institution he was graduated in 1914, later matriculating at the Palmer School at Davenport, Iowa. Upon the conclusion of the period spent in the Palmer School, he went to New York City and established himself in active practice there, but soon, thereafter, opened an office in New Brunswick, New Jersey, continuing to practice 1.1 New York City, however, until 1917, when he discontinued his practice there and since has devoted himself exclusively to his ever-increasing clientele in this community, his office at No. go Monument Square.

Dr. McDonald is a member of New Brunswick Lodge, No. 324, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Improved Order of Red Men. In religion he is a Presbyterian, being a member of the First United Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh.

With a vigorous and luminous intellect, Dr. McDonald combines strength of character and a genial disposition. This union of traits explains in a large measure his success, and gives promise of even more • signal achievements in the future. He is a close student, keeping fully abreast of modern thought in all matters pertaining to his profession, and he possesses the high esteem and implicit confidence of the general public. Dr. McDonald has never married.
 

AUGUST C. STREITWOLF.—This name is not an introduction, it is simply an announcement. To introduce Mr. Streitwolf to the readers of this work would be wholly superfluous, for his high standing as a representative citizen is common knowledge beyond the limits of his home town, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

August C. Streitwolf was born in New Brunswick, May 19, 1879, the son of August and Elizabeth (Landmesser) Streitwolf. He obtained his elementary education in the public schools of his native place and then entered Peddle Institute at Hightstown, New Jersey, where he remained for a while, after which, having determined to adopt the law as a profession, he matriculated at the law school of the New York University, from which he was graduated in i9oo with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and was admitted to practice as an attorney and counsellor in New York State, May 14, 1901, as an attorney in New Jersey, June Jo, 1901, and as a counsellor in this State, June 29, 1904. From woir until 1919 he maintained an office for general practice in both New York City and New Brunswick, New Jersey, but when elected to his present position as president of the Middlesex Title Guarantee and Trust Company at New Brunswick, he retired from active law practice in New York City, but continued to maintain a nominal office at No. 59 Wall street in connection with his bank duties and the general practice of law at New Brunswick. Mr. Streitwolf is general counsel for the New Brunswick Fire Insurance Company ; also counsel for various corporations, and his favorite branch of legal practice is corporation law.

In politics Mr. Streitwolf is a staunch Democrat, and takes an ardent interest in the affairs of the organization. He served in the General Assembly of New Jersey in 1911, and again was elected to serve the following year. He affiliates with Union Lodge, No. 19, Free and Accepted Masons. A Baptist in religion, he has always served the Livingston Avenue Baptist Church well by personal interest. and his means are ever contributed to it.

On April 17, 1907, Mr. Streitwolf was united in marriage with Edna E. Rose. They have no issue.
August C. Streitwolf might be called one of the most prominent business men in New Brunswick, for such he is in the highest sense. Executant, financier, citizen, philanthropist—all these he is to an eminent degree, but perhaps an attempt to describe him in a single phrase would be best accomplished by the simple statement "that he is a true man."


SELDEN TALCOTT KINNEY, M. D.—When Dr. Kinney came to South Amboy in 1913, he was not without practical medical experience, having been out of college for two years, during which he served as hospital interne, and was associated with his father in sanitarium practice at Easton. He is now well established in practice in South Amboy, and is highly regarded by the brethren of his profession.

Dr. Kinney is of ancient Colonial family, the Kinneys having come from England to New England as early as 1685, descendants serving in the Revolutionary War. His grandfather, T. W. Kinney, married a Miss Ranney, of Vermont, and they settled in Suffield, Connecticut, where they lived until the death of Mr. Kinney, when Mrs. Kinney made her home with her son, Dr. C. Spencer Kinney, at Easton, Pennsylvania.

Dr. C. Spencer Kinney was born in Suffield, Connecticut, April 13, 1855, and died at Easton, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1920. He had been in active practice in Easton for twenty years prior to his death, was a noted alienist, and owner of Easton Sanitarium, an institution widely known. He married Jane L. Dill, born in Middletown, New York, October 29, 1857, who survives her husband, a resident of Easton, Pennsylvania. Dr. and Mrs. Kinney were the parents of two sons : Selden T., of further mention; and Harry Dill, a mining engineer and assistant mine superintendent, a veteran of the World War, having served in France with the engineering section of the American Expeditionary Force, ranking as first lieutenant.

Selden Talcott Kinney was born in Middletown, New York, October 1, 1883, and there attended private and public schools, reaching high school. After his parents located in Easton in 1900, he finished his preparatory study at Easton Academy. He then entered Hamilton College, at Clinton, New York, whence he was graduated A. B., 1906; A. M., 19o9. He then began the study of medicine at the New. York Homeopathic Medical College, receiving his degree M. D., class of 1911. He was interne at Flower and Metropolitan hospitals, New York, in 1911 and 1912, then was his father's medical assistant at Easton Sanitarium for one year. In 1913 he located in South Amboy, New Jersey, where he has spent seven successful years. He has had special training in the treatment of mental and nervous diseases, having taken courses in three hospitals, including the Middletown State Hospital and the Gowanda Hospital. He also studied under his father, a noted alienist, and has won an excellent reputation as a specialist in mental and nervous diseases. He is medical inspector for the public schools of South Amboy, member of the Board of Health for the past four years, member of the staff of South Amboy Hospital, and does the local medical • examining for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.
During the World War period, 1917-1918, Dr. Kinney was medical examiner of the Sayreville Draft Board until a severe illness incapacitated him. He is a member of the Middlesex County Medical Society, New Jersey State Medical Society, and Theta Delta Chi fraternity.

Dr. Kinney married, at Hoboken, New Jersey, April 4, 1914, Martha E. Frame, of Phillipsburg, New Jersey, who died March 31, 1919.


CHARLES R. SMITH. —A resident of New Brunswick, New Jersey, all his life, Charles R. Smith. is closely identified with many of the institutions in this city.

Born May 17, 1888, in New-Brunswick, the boyhood days of Charles R. Smith were spent in the public schools here and Nelson's Business College. His business career began with C. H. Mallory & Company, where he remained for two years, then entering the employ of the Mutual Alliance Trust Company of New York, Mr. Smith continued with them for two years more. His next step forward was when he became connected with the Guarantee Trust Company of New York, where for ten years he was in business, receiving, a thorough training in banking. He graduated from the American Institute of Banking in 1918. In the summer of 1919 he came to New Brunswick to take charge of the newly-created banking department of the Middlesex Title Guarantee and Trust Company as secretary and treasurer.

Mr. Smith is very active in Masonic affairs ; he is a member of Union Lodge, No. 19, Free and Accepted Masons; Scott Chapter, No. 4, Royal Arch Masons; Temple Commandery, No. 18, Knights Templar, all located in New Brunswick. In addition he is a member of Salaam Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Newark, New Jersey; also the Tall Cedars of Lebanon ; and is a trustee of the Board of Trade.

On July 15, 1912, Charles R. Smith was united in marriage with Anna P. Lang, and they have three children: Daniel L., Frances L., and Henry P. Mr. and Mrs. Smith attend the First Presbyterian Church of New Brunswick. The family home is at No. 395 Livingston avenue.
 

ISADORE SIEGEL, M. D.—Although but a few years have elapsed since his coming to Perth Amboy, the name of Dr. Isadore Siegel is already familiar and most favorably so to a majority of residents of the community. Dr. Siegel has during these few years thoroughly identified himself both as a physician and a citizen with the progressive element of the city.

Moses Siegel, father of Isadore Siegel, was born in Russia, and for a number of years carried on a successful grocery business there. In 1908 he retired from active business life and came with his wife and family to this country, settling in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Siegel are the parents of six children : Sophia, wife of H. Goldstein, of Perth Amboy; George, a constructing engineer in Russia; Harry, a dry goods merchant with a store at No. 444 Amboy avenue ; Anna, wife of N. Galosoff, of Perth Amboy; Isadore, of further mention ; Constance, a resident of Newark, New Jersey.

Isadore Siegel, son of Moses and Rose Siegel, was born January 5, 1885, in Russia. After graduating from the Gymnasium in his native city, which is equivalent to the high school in this country, he matriculated in Berlin University, from which he was graduated in 1910 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He immediately came to this country and after serving his internship of one year in the Lying-In Hospital in New York City, and passing his State Board examination, which latter he completed July 5, 1911, he decided to establish himself in the practice of his profession in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where his parents had made their home since coming to this country. With an office at No. 121 Market street, Perth Amboy, he is acquiring a large and steadily growing clientele and carving out for himself a place in the front rank of the city's younger physicians. He is a member of the American Medical Association and the Middlesex Medical Society. Politically, Dr. Siegel is an Independent, voting for the candidate he believes best fitted for the office sought, regardless of party label. He is a member of the Hebrew Synagogue, and also affiliates with the Free and Accepted Masons.
Dr. Siegel married, July 28, 1913, Jeanette Kramer, a daughter of Abraham Kramer, a dry goods merchant at No. 313 State street, Perth Amboy. Dr. and Mrs. Siegel are the parents of a son, Ralph, born May 2, 1914, and a daughter, Shirley Eleanor, born April 2, 1920.

With a vigorous and luminous intellect, Dr. Siegel combines strength of character and a genial disposition. This union of traits explains in a large measure his success and gives promise of even more signal achievements in the future. His hobby is music and he is particularly fond of the opera. He is a close student, keeping fully abreast of modern thought in all matters pertaining to his profession, and possesses the high esteem and explicit confidence of the medical fraternity and the general public.
 

LEO J. COAKLEY.—It is a somewhat unusual occurrence for four generations of one family to be living in the same city, yet such is the case with Leo J. Coakley, he and his little daughter constituting two generations, his mother and her father being the other two, all residing in South Amboy, New Jersey.

Born in that city, December 28, 1890, Leo J. Coakley is the son of John J. and Anna (Costello) Coakley. The former is in the grocery business, at No. 117 Broadway, South Amboy, and was at one time a member of the Board of Education of the city, also treasurer of the Star Building and Loan .Association there. His wife, Anna (Costello) Coakley, is the daughter of _Walter Costello, who came to the United States many years ago from Ireland and has lived in South Amboy for more than fifty years. He is now eighty-four years old (1921). The Coakley family also came from Ireland.

Attending St. Mary's Parochial School in South Amboy in his boyhood, Leo J. Coakley acquired his education partly in that institution and later went to St. Peter's College at Jersey City, New Jersey. After graduating from the latter, Mr, Coakley took up the study of law, becoming a student at the New York Law School. He was admitted to practice at the New Jersey State bar in February, 1914, and at once opened an office in his home town, at No. 118 North Broadway.

In the public affairs of the city Mr. Coakley has been particularly active, both in civic matters and in the field of politics, he being a mem• ber of the Democratic party. In 1916 Mr. Coakley was appointed secretary of the Board of Health of South Amboy, his term being one year. From 1917 to 1920 he was city solicitor of South Amboy.

During the World War Mr. Coakley enlisted in the army and was assigned for duty at the medical detachment headquarters, port of embarkation, Newport News, Virginia, remaining there until discharged, in January, 1919. After the troops were disbanded and the American Legion was formed, Mr. Coakley became a member of it. He is now past vice-commander of the•county association.
In addition to the American Legion, Mr. Coakley is a member of the Knights of Columbus, being a past grand knight of the order. He is also connected with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is fond of outdoor sports, but his favorite pastime is to witness a good baseball game.

At South Amboy, June 5, 1918, Leo J. Coakley was married to Kathryn M. Lyons, a daughter of Thomas and Catherine Lyons. They have one child, Eileen Coakley, born December 18, 1919. Mr. and Mrs. Coakley are members of the Roman Catholic church.
 

AUGUST K. STAUDT.—Captains and leaders of industry in their respective lines almost invariably are self-made men. Their lives blend closely with romance, giving an inspiring example of just what energy, perseverance and ability can accomplish. Success becomes part of their everyday activities, and each year is like a stepping stone to still greater and more pronounced achievements.

August K. Staudt stands prominent among the leading citizens of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, and a brief resume of his life reflects well-earned rewards in his chosen field. Tireless energy and broad public-spirited benevolence have been the keynotes of his success, and his notable progress in local circles indicates still more marked distinction in his activities in the time to come. His career is an inspiration.

Mr. Staudt was born in Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany, on December 6, 1869. He was the second child of Conrad and Rosa Staudt in a family of eight children, four boys and four girls. Receiving his education in Germany, and satisfactorily fulfilling his military duties in the Bavarian army, he left his native land, in 1891. The five years following were spent in England, America and France, and in this time Mr. Staudt perfected his training as a correspondent in foreign languages.

Upon his return to Nuremberg in 1896, Mr. Staudt became connected with a large local industry, and a year later, in 1897, married Katherine P. Vorgang, of Brooklyn, New York, whom he had met on his visit to America, and who, in the year noted, was visiting relatives in Germany. Mr. Staudt was soon made superintendent of the Nuremberg factory, but relinquished this position in 1901 to take, up a residence with Mrs. Staudt in America.

After occupying a number of important positions in bans and commercial houses, Mr. Staudt associated himself with the Perth Amboy Tile Works, and became a resident of this city. The plant at that time was practically unknown and quite insignificant, while the company, itself, had just been reorganized. It was not long before unexpected difficulties arose, and in order to safeguard the investment he had made, Mr. Staudt was compelled to assume the full management of the small tile factory. He was undismayed, however, despite the fact that his working knowledge of ceramics was quite meager, and with grim determination he resolved to build up the establishment, if possible in any way, and make it one of the successful enterprises of the community. He took a hand in affairs immediately, donning his overalls and tackling any job that needed to be done. Nothing was too hard, for it was a case of necessity and resolve—the plant must flourish. Mr. Staudt established a definite working policy for the organization. He rebuilt what remained of the little defunct plant on the solid foundation of honor and integrity In business—the best products at the right price, and the same treatment of every customer, whether large or small. These principles live with the business now, just as they did in the early days, and they are one of die secrets of the remarkable success which the industry has attained.

Step by step the business thrived, and then came into its own. The success has been spectacular, and due to the guiding "hand and persevering energy of Mr. Staudt. The plant was developed and extended from year to year, and to-day occupies a position as one of the most modern and best equipped ceramic.plants in the State of New Jersey. The floor space has grown from 6784 square feet to close to 42,000 square feet, more than six-fold; even now, the capacity is taxed to the utmost to furnish the demands of customers, and still more expansion will be necessary in the future. Mr. Staudt can well take pride in this achievement, for with the plant he has grown to enjoy an enviable position among the leading business men in the State. In his treatment of his employees, he has shown that he has at heart their utmost welfare and security; he has assisted them to purchase homes for their families, arranging large yearly bonuses for faithfully performed duties. Moreover, he has taken out a large block of building and loan stock for operatives at the plant without their knowledge, and which, when due, will be given to deserving employees.

Mr. Staudt is a member of the American Ceramic Society, and past president of the New Jersey Clay Workers' Association and Eastern Section of the American Ceramic Society, and has long occupied a position on the board of directors of the latter organization. He is a thirty-third degree Mason, a member of the East Jersey Club, Raritan Yacht Club, Elks' Club and other well-known organizations. His name will also be found in the membership list of many worthy societies, giving them the benefit of his support and influence.

Mr. and Mrs. Staudt have one child, Augusta Johanna, who was born in Newark, New Jersey, August 16, 1906. The family are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church.
 

EDWARD ALOYSIOUS BRADY. proprietor and manager of the New Brunswick Coal, Ice and Lumber Company, which is located at No. p8 Commercial avenue, New Brunswick, New Jersey, holds a record sized place among the prominent business men of this community. Being a good citizen, as well as an able executant, Mr. Brady is ever ready to cooperate in whatever pertains to the advancement of the public welfare.

Patrick Brady, father of Edward Aloysious, was born March 19, 1829, and died July 22, 1920, at Stapleton, Staten Island, where for many years he had been established in the coal and ice business, being one of the largest railroad contractors in this country. He married Annie M. McAtamney, a native of Ireland, and now a resident of Stapleton. Mr. and Mrs. Brady were the parents of fourteen children, three of whom are still living: Edward Aloysious, of further mention ; Genevieve, wife of Hugh E. Conness; and Anna Rose, wife of Charles E. McAteer.

Edward Aloysious Brady, son of Patrick and Annie M. (McAtamney) Brady, was born March 12, 1877, at Newark, New Jersey. At the age of two years he moved with his parents to Bayonne, New Jersey, and there attended the public schools until he was seventeen years of age, when he terminated his schooling and began his business career. His first employment was with the Consumers' Coal and Ice Company at Bayonne, where he remained for three years, resigning at the end of that time to visit the various coal sections throughout the country. On March 3, 1903, he came to New Brunswick and secured a position with the New Brunswick Ice Company. During the next four years he made himself familiar with it in every detail, and when four years later he bought the entire business, he was capable of taking it and managing it most efficiently,, which is proven by the consistent growth of the enterprise. The name of the company is now the New Brunswick Coal, Ice and Lumber Company.

Mr. Brady has never held any public office, but has always been keenly interested in the welfare of the community, and active in securing the choice of the best men available for such posts. He affiliates with  the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Columbus, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, Order of Eagles, Lion Club, and the Improved Order of Red Men. In his religious views he is a Roman Catholic, and attends the Sacred Heart Church of that denomination at New Brunswick.

On October 17, 1906, Edward Aloysious Brady was united in marriage with Mary A. R. Smith, of New Brunswick, daughter of the late Thomas and Mary (Lynch) Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Brady are the parents of two children: Vincent Patrick, born July 22, t907; Edward, born June 29, 1918.
 

DR. B. W. HOAGLAND, of Woodbridge, was born in. Danville, New Jersey, December 3, 1866, son of Nathan and Emily E. (Albertson) Hoagland, both Hoaglands and Albert/ions being among the oldest New jersey families. Nathan Hoagland was a farmer of Danville all his active life, and a man highly esteemed in his community. Dr. Hoagland attended the public schools of Philadelphia and in 1883 entered the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, whence he was graduated in the class of i886. He began practice in Oxford, New Jersey, the year of his graduation, there continuing eleven years, until 1897, removing in the latter year to Woodbridge, New Jersey, where he has now been in practice for twenty-four years, 1897-1921.

During the war of 1917-18 he served in the Medical Corps of the United States army, from August II, £917, to December 1918, with the rank of captain. After receiving honorable discharge, he returned to Woodbridge and resumed private practice. Dr. Hoagland is a director of the First National Bank of Woodbridge, and of the Port Reading Building and Loan Association ; a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Maccabees of the World; and the Royal Arcanum. In politics he is an Independent; his church membership is with the Congregational church of Woodbridge.

Dr. Hoagland married, at Oxford, New Jersey, Alice E. Perry, daughter of Oliver N. and Rebecca G. (Van Sickle) Perry, she a descendant of the Commodore Oliver H. Perry family, and of the ancient Van Sickle family, of Warren county, New Jersey. Dr. and Mrs. Hoagland are the parents of four children : Verna L., Edith E., Lewis P., and Alice R.
 

JAMES PARKER and his father, also James, two •of New Jersey's eminent sons, were residents of Middlesex county. James Parker, Sr., was an active member of the Board of Proprietors of the colony of New Jersey, and a member of the Provincial Council prior to the Revolution. He was a man of large landed interests, and very influential.

The son, James Parker, born in Bethlehem, Hunterdon county, New Jersey, March 3, 1776, died in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, April 1868. He was a graduate of Columbia College, class of 1791, and later became a merchant of New York City. Upon the death of his father, James (2) Parker returned to Perth Amboy and there ever after resided. He was a member of the New Jersey Legislature, 1806-28; commissioner to fix the boundary line between New Jersey and New York in 1827-29; collector of the port of Amboy, £829 30; elected to Congress as a Federalist in 1832, served two terms, and was a delegate to the State Constitutional Convention of 1844.

Always active in public affairs, he was widely known and honored. For many years he was a vice-president of the New Jersey Historical Society, and from 1864 until his death was its president. He gave to Rutgers College the land on which its buildings stand, and was always a warm friend of the cause of education.
 

ABRAHAM B. KERR—The story of Abraham S. Kerr is a history of obstacles overcome and a definite end achieved, not only in an ordinary degree, but followed to a highly specialized point. As one of the most prominent pharmacists of New Brunswick, New Jersey, he now stands in the lead in a profession which demands of every man engaged in it the greatest skill and precision, as well as exhaustive technical knowledge.

Mr. Kerr was born in the State of Vitebsk, Russia, May Ito, 189o. He attended the schools of that locality until he was fifteen years of age, when he came to America to join his parents, who had theretofore come to New York City to found a home for their family. In New York the boy went to work in a drug store, but not content with the subordinate position which he was able to fill in the beginning, act high his standard of achievement, and proceeded to reach it. He attended night school faithfully and punctually, and in 1911 passed his Regent's examination. In 1912, with what assistance his family was able t:) give him, together with his savings, the young man entered Fordham University and was graduated in Pharmacy in 1914. Following his graduation he took a special post-graduate course in Bacteriology covering the year 1915. This preparation placed Mr. Kerr in line for big work. He accepted a position in New York City, in Analytical Bacteriology, continuing along this line for one year. Next he became associated with the Liggett Company, as manager. His ambition, however, was to place himself at the head of an establishment of his own, and to that end he came to New Brunswick, June 23, 1917, and purchased his present store on the corner of Church and Neilson streets. He greatly enlarged the location, redecorating and improving the building, and making it up-to-date in every respect. Although beginning at so recent a date, comparatively, Mr. Kerr has placed himself in the front line in this business in New Brunswick, and commands a splendid trade. His future looks very bright, and with the foundations upon which he has built, success in large measure is only a matter of time. Personally, Mr. Kerr is a man of broad interests, keeping in touch with every phase of public activity and scientific development. He finds his relaxation in outdoor sports.

Mr. Kerr's people are all connected with the drug business in Greater New York. His father, Solomon Kerr, who was born in Russia, now lives retired in New York City, and was formerly a glass manufacturer. He married Hannah Lockshin, also born in Russia, and now a resident of New York City. Of their children, Abraham S. Kerr, of New Bruns- wick, is the second. The oldest, Luba, is now the wife of Saul Goldfarb, of Brooklyn, New York. Of the younger sons and daughters Julius resides in Brooklyn, and Sophie, Joseph and Bertha reside in New York City.

Mr. Kerr married, in New York City, June 4, 1917, Dorothy I. Weiner. who was born in Riga, Russia, and is the daughter of Jacob and Mary Weiner, now residents of Brooklyn, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Kerr have one daughter, Florence, born April 14, 1919.
 

CHAUNCEY CLARK BALDWIN, vice-president of the Standard Underground Cable Company of Perth Amboy, president of *the East Jersey Club, and one of the most prominent citizens of Perth Amboy, where he enjoys a well-earned reputation for his intelligent and public-spirited participation in public affairs, is a native of Ohio, his birth having occurred in the town of Maumee, Lucas county, Ohio, June 26, 1866.

He is a son of Perry C. and Jane (Starkweather) Baldwin, the former a Presbyterian minister in Northern Ohio for more than fifty years. The Rev. Mr. Baldwin was born in Ashville, North Carolina, and died in Toledo, Ohio, in 1893, at the age of seventy-seven years. His wife was a native of North Hampton, Ohio, and died in Waterbury, Connecticut, in 1889. They were the parents of five children, as follows : Charles R., deceased; Julia N., who became the wife of John M. Nichols, of Waterbury, Connecticut; Sarah T., who became the wife of W. H. Dodge, of Jefferson, Ohio, and is now deceased; William H., of Delta, Ohio, now deceased ; and Chauncey Clark, with whom we are here concerned.

Chauncey Clark Baldwin passed the first part of his childhood in his native town of Maumee, Ohio, and there attended the local public schools, graduating from the high school after being prepared for a collegiate course. He then entered the. New Lyme Institute at New Lyme, Ashtabula county, Ohio, and was graduated with the class of 1885, taking the degree of B. S. Immediately after completing his studies at the latter institution, he secured a position with the Waterbury Clock Company of Waterbury, Connecticut, but remained with that concern only one year. He left this position in order to accept a position as superintendent for the firm of Wallace & Sons, dealers in brass and copper at Ansonia, Connecticut, in which he continued for ten years. The next two years were spent by him as superintendent of the Hendricks Brothers Copper Mills at Soho, New Jersey, from which he resigned to become the general manager of the Waclark Wire Company of Elizabeth, New Jersey. After three years there he became general manager of the National Conduit and Cable Company of Hastings-on-Hudson, and two years later resigned to become connected with the Standard Underground Cable Company of Perth Amboy, an association that has continued to the present time. His first position with the Standard Company was as manager of its wire mill, but in 1916 he was appointed vice-president of the concern and still holds that office. Besides his association with this company, Mr. Baldwin has taken an active interest in the development of the financial interests of Perth Amboy and is now a director of the First National Bank of the city. In politics he is a Republican, and although not a politician in any sense, has taken part in the conduct of public affairs and has held membership on the Water Board of the city for some years. He is a prominent figure in Masonic circles, having attained the thirty-second degree in Free Masonry, and is a member of Lodge No. 6z, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Royal Arch Masons; Royal and Select Masters; Knights Templar; Salaam Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and Sovereign Princes of the Royal Secret. Besides these Masonic bodies he is affiliated with Lodge No, 784, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; the East Jersey Club, of which he is the president; and the Colonial Golf Club. He is a devotee of outdoor sports of all kinds and takes particular pleasure in golf and automobiling. A Presbyterian in religious belief, Mr. Baldwin attends the church of that denomination in Perth Amboy.

Chauncey Clark Baldwin married (first) February z, 1906, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Caroline Stephen, whose death occurred August 23, 1918. He married (second) September 18, 1919, Matilde W. Hiester, in- Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

FREDERICK WILLIAMS De VOE, prominent in legal circles, and in the general life of Middlesex county and the city of New Brunswick, whose career as an attorney and as the holder of important public offices has already won for him the respect and esteem of the community, and made him an influential man in local affairs, is a native of New Jersey.

George W. De Voe, father of Frederick W. De Voe, and son of the late George W. De Voe, founder and president until his death of the People's Natio.111 Bank, New Brunswick, was a former borough clerk and postmaster at Spotswood, New Jersey, and is now in the real estate and insurance business there. He married Alice Appleby, daughter of Herbert Appleby, former postmaster of Old Bridge. To Mr. and Mrs. George W. Devoe was born a son, Frederick Williams, mentioned below.

Frederick Williams De Voe was born in Old Bridge, New Jersey, November 15, 1889, and secured the elementary portion of his education in the public school at Spotswood. He afterwards attended Peddle Institute, at Hightstown, and upon completing a business course at this institution he secured a position as reporter on the "Home News" at New Brunswick and later on the "Evening News" at Perth Amboy. In 1912, having chosen the profession of law for his life work, he matriculated in the New York Law School, and was admitted to practice law in New Jersey in 1915. He then opened an office at No. 4o Paterson street, and commenced the practice of his profession, attaining a most remarkable and gratifying success. He is already recognized as a successful member of the bar of Middlesex county, although having been practicing but a comparatively short time, and enjoys a large popular reputation. In his political life he is a Democrat, and was elected to the General Assembly for the year 1919 and reelected for the year 1920. During the year 1919 he served as chairman of the towns and townships committee, and as a member of the Board of Education, also served as a member of the latter for the year 1920, in addition to being a member of the Board of Public Health. He was the father of the bill of minimum wages of $7oo for school teachers, in 1919, and in the following year was sponsor for the $i,000 wage. He fraternizes with the following organizations: Middlesex County Bar Association ; New Jersey State Bar Association ; Palestine Lodge, No. I it, Free and Accepted Masons ; Scott Chapter, No. 4, Royal Arch itiasons; Charles L. Walters Council, No. 178, Junior Order of United American Mechanics; New Brunswick Lodge, No. 324, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.; Wickatunk Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men ; Forest No. 13, Tall Cedars of Lebanon. He serves as attorney for the Milltown Building and Loan Association, of Milltown; Middlesex County Building and Loan Association, of New Brunswick; and of the First National Bank, of Milltown, New Jersey.

Mr. De Voe married, July 14, 1915, Marion Behringer, daughter of the late Michael and Lydia (Jones) Behringer. Mr. and Mrs. De Voe are the parents of two children : Dorothy Frances, born July 12, 1916; Betty Appleby, born July 13, 1919.


JAMES ALEXANDER MORRISON, numbered among the progressive and prosperous business men of New Brunswick, New Jersey, is a man whose years, sixty-ore, have been years of fruitful endeavor and high attainment. Mr. Morrison is one of those successful men from whose biography the young man may learn how to best direct his efforts in order to attain the worthwhile things of life.
Daniel Morrison, father of James Alexander Morrison, was born in County Armagh, Ireland, and when but a lad emigrated by himself to this country. Upon landing in New York City he remained there for a while, but later removed to New Brunswick, New Jersey, where in 1869 he established himself in the grocery business at the corner of French and James streets and here continued successfully until his death, which occurred in December, 1874. He married Anna Miller Dale, a native of Ireland, her birth having occurred there in 1832. Mrs. Morrison now resides in New Brunswick. To Mr. and Mrs. Morrison were born five children : James Alexander, of further mention ; Mary E., deceased ; John J., William D., and Daniel L.

James Alexander Morrison was born February 6, 186o, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and attended the local public schools until he had reached the age of seventeen years. He then entered his father's grocery store, which he continued to manage for many years, after which his brother became proprietor of the store, and he has since given considerable attention to the publishing business. In October, 1886, he became associated with the H. L. Fairchild medical business, manufacturers of proprietary medicines, having full control as superintendent of same. Mr. Morrison is also a director of the Homestead Building and Loan Association and the Second People's Building and Loan Association.

But it has not been only in the business world that Mr. Morrison's time and energies have been expended. On the contrary there has been no one more interested than he in community affairs, and as a staunch Republican he has taken an active part in politics. From 1906 until 1910 he was city clerk. For ten years he has been a member of the Board of Education and its president two years ; a member of the local Board of Health for five years and its president two years; a member of the New Brunswick Public Library Board one year; in 1920 clerk of the Excise Commissioners and a member of the Public Market Zommittee, and on May 10, 1921, was appointed acting postmaster of the post office in New Brunswick. Besides these business and political activities, Mr. Morrison is affiliated with Palestine Lodge, No. in, Free and Accepted Masons, and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. He also holds membership in the Craftsmen's Club of New Brunswick, and the local Young Men's Christian Association. In his religious belief he is a Presbyterian and attends the local First Church of that denomination.

On April 19, 1883, James Alexander Morrison was united in marriage with Rebecca H. J. MacCowan, daughter of William and Gene (Tate) MacCowan, of New Brunswick, New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison are the parents of four children : Lillian M., Helen J., Jessie L. and George R.

The career of Mr. Morrison from its beginning is characterized by much hard and persistent expenditure of energy, and the substantial position that he has come to occupy in the life of the community is the obvious and appropriate reward of application and mental qualifications of a high order.
 

WILLIAM VAN SICLEN.—The Van Siclens of Middlesex county, New Jersey, are of Revolutionary ancestry, and long seated in the county. This review deals with William Van Siclen, of this ancient family, who was born in Metuchen, August 7, 1839, and there died, March 7, 1907.

William Van Siclen was educated in the public schools, and upon arriving at suitable age became a carpenter's apprentice, learning the trade thoroughly and becoming an expert workman. Later he became a contractor, and during his active life built many residences and other structures in Metuchen and vicinity. He was a man of strong character, and always careful in his business dealings to make no promises which he felt he could not keep. His reputation for upright, honorable dealing was very high, and he never betrayed the confidence his neighbors reposed in him. He was a Democrat in politics, and held many town offices, including that of assessor of taxes. He was an honored member of the Masonic order, and an earnest attendant of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Mr. Van Siclen married, in Bonhampton, New Jersey, January 4, 1865, Phoebe Elizabeth Acken, born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, July 17, 1845, daughter of Jonathan Hatfield and Elizabeth B. (Noe) Acken. The Ackens came -to the United States in the ship "Caledonia," which sank later in the harbor at Amboy, the wreck being yet visible. Jonathan Hatfield Acken was born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, and was a farmer and mason; his wife, Elizabeth B. (Noe) Acken, was born at Oak Tree, New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Acken were the parents of two sons and two daughters : Alonzo, Hannah, Thomas, and Phoebe Elizabeth, the last-named the widow of William Van Siclen, who resides in Metuchen and is now (1921) in her seventy-sixth year, having been a widow for twelve years after a happy married life of forty-two years spent in Metuchen, her husband's birthplace.
 

ROBERT J. SOLMSON.—The Janeway Button Company of New Brunswick, of which Robert J. Solmson is vice-president, was organized July io, 1900, and is the development of a business founded by William R. Janeway and conducted under his own name for three years before the organization of the present concern. The officers are: William R Janeway, president; Robert J. Solmson, vice-president; and John L. Duryee, treasurer, Their specialty is the making of vegetable ivory buttons, beans, etc., and the company occupies a strong position in the trade.
 

HOWARD CROSBY VOORHEES, M. D.—As a result of a number of years of successful and devoted practice, Dr. Voorhees is too firmly Wrenched in the confidence and friendship of his fellow-citizens of New Brunswick to require any introduction at the hands of his biographer. He is quietly but helpfully identified with the most essential interests of his home city and is ever ready to use his influence in behalf of all that he deems conducive to the public progress and welfare.

Howard Crosby Voorhees was born January 4, 1879, in New Brunswick, and is a son of the late Abraham and Martha J. (Van Nostrand) Voorhees, and a brother of Judge Willard P. Voorhees and Clifford Irving Voorhees, both of whom are represented in this work by biogra- phies, that of the latter including a full ancestral record.

The early education of .Howard Crosby Voorhees was received at Rutgers Preparatory School, from which he graduated in 1898. In 1902 he received from Princeton University the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in 1906 the College of Physicians and Surgeons conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Medicine. His medical preceptor was Dr. Frank M. Donohue, deceased, he being associated with him in practice for five years.

After one year as interne in Bellevue Hospital, Dr. Voorhees, in 1907, opened an office In New Brunswick and has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession in that.city, building up, at the same time, a lucrative and constantly increasing practice and an assured and well deserved reputation for skill, knowledge and devotion to duty.
The principles upheld bythe Republican party are those to which Dr. Voorhees gives his political allegiance. During the recent World War, he served on the examining board, and was also a member of the Volunteer Medical Service Board. He belongs to the Middlesex County and New Jersey State Medical societies, and the American Medical Association. He is a member of the Rutgers Medical Club, and Princeton Campus Club. He and his family are members of the Presbyterian church. Dr. Voorhees is also a member of the medical staff of St. Peter's General Hospital, and the Parker Memorial Home.

One of Dr. Voorhees's dominant characteristics is an enthusiastic devotion to music. He is a pianist of some local note and finds in his art refreshment and relaxation from the cares and responsibilities of an exacting profession. Dr. Voorhees married, January 19, 1918, at Princeton, New Jersey, Florence M. Ward, born in England, daughter of Thomas and Annie (Cook) Ward, of Newark, Mr. Ward having retired from business. The marriage ceremony was performed by President John G. Hibben, of Princeton University. Dr. and Mrs. Voorhees are the parents of one child: Florence Adelaide, born January 9, 1920, in New York City.

The professional career of Dr. Voorhees has been filled with activities, but he is in the prime of life and his record gives assurance that the coming years will be stilt richer in accomplishment.
 

ROSCOE GLENN DAVISON.—The Davison name has long been associated with the business interests of Middlesex county, particularly in Jamesburg, where Benjamin D. Davison in 1892 established a building materials business which in later years became the corporation the B. D. Davison Lumber Company, of which R. Glenn Davison Is vice-president and treasurer.

R. Glenn Davison was born in Jamesburg, Middlesex county, New Jersey, September 9, 1889, son of Benjamin D. and Eudora (Worts) Davison, his father a merchant. After courses of study in Jamesburg public schools, grade and high, were completed, the young man pursued a business course at the Rider, Moore and Stewart School, and then in May, Nos, entered his father's employ, the latter then operating a general supply store in Jamesburg, dealing in building materials, coal and hardware, furniture, paints, etc. For eleven years he continued in the business as an employee, whic' -vas a prosperous one. In April, 1916, it was incorporated as the B. D. Davison Lumber Company, R. Glenn Davison becoming vice-president and treasurer, a position he yet ably fills. He is also secretary-treasurer of Davison Estates, a position he has filled since August, 1912.

Mr. Davison is an elder of the First Presbyterian Church of James-burg, and superintendent of the Sunday school of that church. He is affiliated with the local lodge of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics; in political faith he is a Democrat.

Mr. Davison married, in Jamesburg, October 15, 1913, Cora May Kirkpatrick, daughter of David L. and Mary (Bowne) Kirkpatrick. Their daughter, Jeanette, born October 27, 1915, died January 24, 1917. The family home is in Jamesburg.
 

WILLIAM E. MOUNT is recognized as one of the foremost business men in- Middlesex county, being the oldest and largest authorized Ford automobile dealer in the State of New Jersey. In everything pertaining to the welfare and advancement of the community he takes an active part, and has already done much to promote the prosperity of New Brunswick.

Mr. Mount was born June 24, 1863, the son of Joseph B. and Margaret Mount. He obtained his education in the public schools. In 1884 Mr. Mount moved to the little village of Englishtown, where he purchased a store, which in a year's time he had turned into a department store. In 1889 the store was totally destroyed by fire, but this did not discourage Mr. Mount, for a year later he had erected a new store, modern in every way, and built of brick and terra cotta tile. In time the people found it to their advantage to live in Englishtown, and a general rebuilding of the town took place. By 1895 many of the old buildings were supplanted by modern dwellings, the streets were paved and good roads made leading to New Brunswick and other towns near at hand. Nine years later, when Henry Ford offered the agency to any person willing to sell his motor cars, Mr. Mount took it and received one of the first Ford cars that was seen in the southern part of New Jersey. Mr. Ford soon noticed that Mr. Mount thought well of his product and so decided to appoint him distributor for four counties, in which he finally appointed twenty sub-dealers. Mr. Mount's first contract called for twenty-five cars; today his contracts covering the four branches he owns amount to eleven hundred cars, which only covers the minimum sales he makes. A total number of six thousand cars have been delivered by him in the fifteen years that he has been handling them. To-day finds Mr. Mount the owner of four modern Ford service stations, which are equipped with all modern Ford repairing tools and machinery. Next to Englishtown, William E. Mount takes a keen interest in the affairs of New Brunswick, and in consequence built the first modern fireproof building on Albany street, foresight again telling him that this street would be the real business center.

Mr. Mount has served two years as Assemblyman, is a director of the First National Bank of Englishtown, and belongs to several of the local fraternal organizations.
 

JOSHUA LIDDLE, now a retired farmer and business man, comes from English family, his parents, Joshua and Anna (Buck) Liddle, both born in England, where they were married. Joshua (i) Liddle was an English farmer, and in i825 came to the United States, settling in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where his son, Joshua (2) Liddle, was born, October 3o, 1840.

Joshua (2) Liddle grew to manhood at Perth Amboy, obtaining a good public school education. For many years he was engaged In the retail ice business, but finally retired to a good Middlesex county farm, not far from Woodbridge, which he purchased. There he lived contented and prosperous for a number Of years. Later, in 1909, he sold this farm and purchased a smaller property near Metuchen, which he occupied.until the death of his wife, in 192o, then removed to Perth Amboy, where he lives retired with his son, Clarence M. Liddle. Mr. Liddle is now an octogenarian, and is remarkably preserved for his years, his faculties being especially keen for his years. He is a Republican in politics; a member of the Woodbridge Methodist Episcopal Church; and Woodbridge Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Being a good business man, Mr. Liddle has gained a competence through his energy and ability, and has spent a life of honorable effort Ind right living. He is highly respected by all who know him, and his friends are many.

Joshua Liddle married, October 23, 1866, in Woodbridge, New Jersey, Anna L. Mellick, born February 11, 1848, died October 27, 1920, daughter of Melancthon F. and Elizabeth (Randolph) Mellick, her father born at Short Hills, New Jersey. Two sons were born to Joshua and Anna L. (Mellick) Liddle: 1. Arthur M., born September 8, 1867; married Fanny Tyler, and they have a daughter, Florence. 2. Clarence M., born November 29, 1871; married Clara Pfeiffer, and they have three children : Clarence K., William P., and Jean R. This family resides in Perth Ambdy, New Jersey, at No. 178 Rector street.
 

J. MILTON BRINDLE, acting postmaster of Milltown, New Jersey, since the resignation of Postmaster Booream, was born November as, 1873, in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, son of John L. and Anna (Staub) Brindle, his father now a retired farmer. John L. Brindle was born in Virginia, but as a young man located in Pennsylvania where he married Mary Staub, born in Mechanicsburg, where they yet reside.

J. Milton Brindle was educated in the public schools, and grew up on the home farm. Later he left his Pennsylvania home, and has since served in different capacities in different towns. In z910 he was appointed assistant postmaster in Milltown, New Jersey, and has since held that office continuously. When postmaster Booream resigned the office of postmaster in 192o, Mr. Brindle was appointed acting postmaster and yet serves (April, 192x) no successor yet having been appointed. In politics he is a Republican, and in religion, a Lutheran. He is a member of the Improved Order of Red Men and th Order of United American Mechanics.

Mr. Brindle married, March 15, 1904, Ma:garet Schlosser, born May 15, /878, died April 8, 1916, daughter of Henry and Catherine (Kuhlthau) Schlosser, her father born in Germany, came to the United States in i87o. Mr. and Mrs. Brindle are the parents of four children : Milton, born June 4, 1905; Landis, born January 7, 1907; Warner, born June 12, £909; Doris, born February 29, 1911.
 

JULIUS THEODORE SIMMER, wholesale baker and a successful business man of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, was born in Cassel, Germany, February 28, 1873, son of Theodore and Marie (Leckert) Sim-men, his father a potter. When eight years of age he was brought to the United States by his parents, they settling first in Hoboken, later in Perth Amboy, New Jersey.

Julius T. Simmen attended public schools until thirteen years of age, then began his business career by entering the employ of his father, who was engaged in the manufacture of pottery. He began at the bottom, learning the business and working his way up to a partnership in the concern. As the business increased in volume, they added the manufacture of crucibles, fire bricks, slabs, bake ovens and all clay material  products. He continued in this line of business until he was twenty-eight years old, when he gave up the manufacture of pottery and entered the wholesale baking business, and now is the head of the largest baking • establishment in the county of Middlesex, and one of the most successful business men of Perth Amboy. At the time he gave up the manufacture of pottery he had a number of bake ovens on hand, and conceived the idea of using them in his new undertaking. They proved very satisfactory from the first and reduced greatly the initial cost of the new business which proved a success from the start. Beginning with one barrel of flour per day, he is now consuming seventy-five barrels of flour in twenty-four hours, and turning out four hundred thousand loaves of bread a month. He is a director of the City National Bank of Perth Amboy, and has other business interests of importance.

Mr. Simmen is a member of Perth Amboy Lodge, No. 784, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; the Foresters of America, No. 58; the Raritan Yacht Club; Good Fellowship Club of New York; several Automobile clubs; the Bakers' Club of New Jersey; the National Bakers' Association of America; is a Republican in politics, and a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Perth Amboy.
Mr. Simmen married, August 4, 1906, in Metuchen, New Jersey, Jennie W. Wittnebert, daughter of the late Henry and Anna M. Wittnebert. Mr. and Mrs. Simmen are the parents of four children : Julius Theodore (2), born June 14, 1907; Jeannette Marie, born October 26, i9o8; Robert Henry, born April is, isao; William Charles, born March
7. 1912.
 

JOSEPH MAGEE' PERRINE.—The Perrine family of New Jersey is of French Huguenot blood and trace their lineage to Henri Perrine, who was one of that group of French refugees who fled to escape religious persecution and were brought over to East Jersey by Sir Philip Carteret in 1665, when he came to assume the government of that province. From Henri Perrine, the Huguenot, sprang a large and influential family, the line to Joseph Magee Perrine, of Jamesburg, New Jersey, being traced from Henri Perrine and his wife, Marie Thorel, through their third child, Henry Perrine; his son, John Perrine; his son, John (2) Perrine, and his wife, Mary Rue; their son, John (3) Perrine, and his first wife, Ann Stout; their son, Enoch Perrine, and his wife, Mary Ely; their son, Thomas Ely Perrine, and his wife, Harriet C. Magee; their son, Joseph' Magee Perrine, and his wife, Edna Marie Dixon, and their children, of the ninth American generation—Marjory Dixon ; Phyllis Magee, and Virginia Roberts Perrine.

(I) Henri Perrine, the ancestor, arrived in New York, on the ship "Philip," July 29, 1665. It is said that he was a descendant of Count Pierre Perrine, of La Rochelle, Lower Charente, France, who had .fled from the persecution which followed the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, in 1685. Count. Pierre Perrine and his family, carrying all the wealth they could secrete on their persons, embarked at La Rochelle, and by way of the Netherlands found their way into England. Henri Perrine, the year after his arrival in East Jersey, married Marie Thorel, Governor Carteret issuing the license, February 12, 1666. Marie Thorel was a French girl, who came over on the ship with Henri Perrine. Their marriage is said to have been the first celebrated on the Elizabeth plantation. After their marriage, they removed to Staten Island. 

(II) Henry. Perrine, son of Henri and Marie (Thorel) Perrine, was born on Staten Island. On November 1, 171z, he bought land on Matchaponix creek, then in Middlesex county, New Jersey. He married, and had a son, John, of whom further.

(III) John Perrine, son of Henry Perrine, owned land at English-town, where he is buried with his wife.

(IV) John (a) Perrine; son of John (I) Perrine, :harried Mary Rue, who died April i8, 1824, and is buried in Old Tennent Churchyard. He died April 26, 1804, and is buried at Hills.

(V) John (3) Perrine, a major in Middlesex county, New Jersey Militia, during the Revolution, was born March 3o, 1762, died November 17, 1848, and was buried at the .Old Tennent Churchyard. He was a large landowner, his farm later the residence of Louis Ryno. He married (first) August 5, 1785, Ann Stout, born August 12, 1761, died December 28, 1822, daughter of David and Catherine (Barclay) Stout. She was buried in Old Tennent Churchyard, where later her. husband was laid beside her. They were the parents of nine children, of whom Enoch Perrine was the sixth child. John (3) Perrine married (second) Catherine Perrine, who bore him six children.

(VI) Enoch Perrine, son of John (3) and Ann (Stout) Perrine, was born in 18431, died in 1856; married, in 1823, Mary Ely, and among their children was a son, Thomas Ely Perrine.

(VII) Thomas Ely Perrine, son of Enoch and Mary (Ely) Perrine, married Harriet C. Magee, December is, 1871, and they are the parents of Joseph Magee Perrine, of whom further.

(VIII) Joseph Magee Perrine, son of Thomas Ely and Harriet C. (Magee) Perrine, was born at Jamesburg, New Jersey, January 22, 1873. After attending public schools, he became a student at Peddie Institute, Hightstown, New Jersey, and later completed his studies at Coleman's Business College, Newark, New Jersey. He enlisted in business life as an employee of Wilkinson, Gaddis & Company, wholesale grocers of Newark, New Jersey, remaining with that company three years. His next position was with J. C. Magee & Son, lumber and coal dealers of Jamesburg, New Jersey, with whom he remained three years. In 1896, with Frederick L. Buckelew, he bought the business, which was reorganized as Perrine & Buckelew, Inc., and is still the head of that corporation, dealing in lumber, coal and builders' supplies. Samuel E. Perrine, brother of Joseph M., is vice-president of the corporation. Daniel B. Malan, treasurer, and Jacob Wyckoff, secretary.

Mr. Perrine is also president of the First National Bank of James-burg, a director of the Perth Amboy Trust Company, and director of the Middlesex Title Guarantee and Trust Company. He is also vice  president of the Barlow Foundry Company, of Newark, and vice-president of William Dixon, Inc., New York City. Although but in the prime of life, he has accomplished much, and is one of the strong, influential men of his county.

Through his patriotic ancestry, Mr. Perrine has gained admission to the New Jersey Society, Sons of the American Revolution, and he is also affiliated with the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. In church affiliation he is a Presbyterian, belonging to Jamesburg First Church.

Mr. Perrine married, in Newark, New Jersey, June 16, 1896, Edna Marie Dixon, daughter of William and Amelia Dixon. Mr. and Mrs. Perrine are the parents of three children : Marjory Dixon, Phyllis Magee, and Virginia Roberts. The family home is at Jamesburg, New Jersey.
 

EVERETT CLINTON ENSIGN.—When Mr. Ensign retired from railroad employ after thirty-five years of faithful service, he continued in the office to which he was first appointed a quarter of a century ago —secretary to the Board of Education of Woodbridge, Middlesex county, New Jersey, a town in which he first saw the light and where he still resides. He is a son of Samuel E. and Pamelia (Vining) Ensign, his father an old time teacher and later a general merchant of Woodbridge. He came to that town from Simsbury, Connecticut, where the Ensign family had long been seated. Pamelia (Vining) Ensign was of old Massachusetts family, she coming from Southwick.
The Ensigns of Simsbury, Connecticut, descend from James Ensign, born in England, who was among the first settlers of Cambridge, Massachusetts. The family was located in Kent, England, as early as 1395, and in Norfolk, Essex, and other English counties very early. James Ensign came to Hartford, Connecticut, with Rev. Thomas Hooker's colony, was among the original members of the First Church there, and ranks with founders of that city. He was a man of importance in the early settlement. Hartford was the family home of this branch until the fifth generation, when Moses Ensign, son of Isaac, moved to Simsbury, Connecticut, that town giving him a grant of land as an inducement to settle there and ply his blacksmith's trade. He died there, May 12, 1816, at the age of sixty-nine. He was undoubtedly the great-grandfather of Samuel E. Ensign, father of Everett Clinton Ensign, of Woodbridge, New Jersey.

Everett C. Ensign was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, February 27, 1858, and there yet resides, a man most highly esteemed in the town of his birth. He was educated in Woodbridge public schools, State Normal School at Trenton, and a business college at Newark, New Jersey. He began business life immediately after school years were over, his first position being with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in their Jersey City office. He remained with the Pennsylvania system thirty-five years, being connected with the maintenance of equipment department in the accounting division. He won many promotions and increases in salary, but finally, in September, 1914, tendered his resignation and sundered the associations of thirty-five years.

In 1899 Mr. Ensign was elected by the members of the Woodbridge Board of Education as secretary of that board, a position he has now held for twenty-two years. In 1917 he was appointed by .the township authorities to rearrange- an assessment system, and he has since continued that work in addition to his secretarial duties. He is deeply interested in civic affairs and public matters generally, and takes an active part in all movements that promise to advance the interests of Woodbridge.

Mr. Ensign is a Republican in politics. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Royal Arcanum of Woodbridge. In religious affiliation the family is connected with the Methodist Episcopal church of Woodbridge.

Mr. Ensign married, in Newark, New Jersey, Ida Ayres, daughter of John D. and Maria Ayres, her father a clay miner and dealer of Woodbridge, and of an ancient New Jersey family. Mr. and Mrs. Ensign are the parents of three children : Everett M., who is now editor
of the Life Insurance "News" of New York City, and secretary of the National Association of Life Insurance Underwriters. He married Evelyn Stout, of Rahway, New Jersey. 2. Ralph W., who was a member of the famous Seventh Regiment of New York City, and was commissioned captain in the United States army during the World War, 1917-1918, stationed at Camp Upton, Long Island ; he is now manager of the Garden City Company, Garden City, Long Island. 3. Helen V., who has been a teacher in Woodbridge schools since 1904.
 

EDWARD A. PFEIFFER.—A great contributing factor to the prosperity of Middlesex county has been the vast deposits of clay of superior quality for the manufacture of fire brick, tile, drain pipe, terra cotta and other articles of common use. Edward A. Pfeiffer, now passed into eternal rest, was' one of the men who aided in developing the clay products industry. For many years he mixed clay, and was connected with Henry Maurer & Son, at Maurer, New Jersey. His service with them continued for about thirty-five years, until his death in 1917. He was an important man in the business, and was held in high esteem, and had many friends in business and social life.

Edward A. Pfeiffer, son of John and Sophia (Waltz) Pfeiffer was born at Fords, New Jersey, July 27, 1865, died there, July 17, 1917. He grew up on the home farm and obtained a good public school education, finishing in high school. He later became interested in the clay business, and was a miner of clay. The business he established, and long successfully conducted, is still managed by his son, who was trained in the business under his honored father.

In politics Mr. Pfeiffer was a Republican, and so interested in the welfare of his community that for fifteen years he served upon the Town Council. He was a devout church man, and long a member of the Presbyterian church of Metuchen. He was a member of the Masonic order, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and the Royal Arcanum. He was interested in all of these orders, and in everything that was of interest and benefit to the community in which he lived. He was a good business man, citizen, a friend and neighbor, and above all a good home man.

Mr. Pfeiffer married, December 1892, Mary E. Liddle, born at Fords, New Jersey, February 12, 1874, daughter of John and Margaret (Emmons) Liddle. Mr. and Mrs. Pfeiffer were the parents of seven children : Edward L., born December t 1, 1893, died August 14, 1896; Russell E., born September 20, 1895, died January 29, 1897; Sophie I., born May 9, 1897, married Henry C. Koster, of Perth Amboy; Clifford 0., born April 19, 1899, married Bess. L. Warren, of Perth Amboy ; J. Spencer, born May 3, 1901; Elizabeth M., born January 24, 1904; and Robert W., born April 7, 1910. Mrs. Mary E. (Liddle) Pfeiffer survives her husband, and continues her residence at the old Pfeiffer home, between Fords and Metuchen, near the village of Fords, in which place she was born, and where her life has been largely passed.


JOHN H. LOVE, PH. B.—The career of John H. Love became interwoven with the history of Woodbridge High School in 1895, and since that year the history of one is the history of both, so far as is literally possible. A quarter of a century has elapsed since a committee from the Woodbridge Board of Education, after a personal investigation of Professor Love's work in other fields, reported favorably upon his appointment to the principalship of the Woodbridge High School, and during that period the growth and advancement of the school and of the schools of the township of Woodbridge have been phenomenal, for since 1901, Professor Love has been supervising principal of all schools of the township. He has won high position among educators, and is an honor to the teaching profession. He is of English birth and parentage, a son of William S. and Mary A. (Brindley) Love, who in the year 1887 left their English home and came to the United States.

John H. Love was born in Hanley, Staffordshire, England, December 7, i868, and there spent the first twenty years of his life. He was educated in the public schools and Teachers' Training classes, winning a Queen's Scholarship. He was for two years an assistant master of the Cannon Street School for Boys, and received the highest rating as a teacher. With this training and record he came to the United States in 1889, his first position in this country being as teacher of an ungraded school in Salem county, New Jersey. In September, 189o, he began a two years' engagement as principal of the North Long Branch School, and in September, 1892, he began his three years' term as principal of the public school at Belmar, New Jersey. There he inaugurated a high school department, and brought the standard of the school to a par with other educational institutions of its class. Then came the call to Woodbridge, where a quarter of a century of most suc- cessful work stands to his credit.

In 1895, when Professor Love came to Woodbridge as principal of the high school, there were in the different districts, of the township school buildings with a capacity mostly of one and two rooms, the only exception being School No. 1, in Woodbridge, which had twelve rooms. The Six Roads School had one room; Locust 'Grove, one room; Rahway Neck, one room; Fords, two rooms; Iselin, one room; and at Carteret there were four rooms in use. After six years as principal of the high school, Professor Love was made supervising principal of township schools and at once began a campaign for more, larger and better equipped school buildings, and for a wider curriculum, and a larger teaching staff. These results have all been attained through his unceasing, uncompromising efforts, and the benefit of his administration is in evidence in every department.

There are now nine school buildings in the township, with another in course of erection at Sewaren, all being of modern fireproof construction. These buildings contain eighty-nine class rooms, exclusive of manual training rooms, gymnasiums, auditoriums, and other special rooms. These are all modernly furnished and equipped, no better being found anywhere. Woodbridge has a high school and two primary schools, the other schools being in Port Reading, Avenel, Iselin, Fords, fteasbey, and Hope Lawn. About thirty-five hundred children of school age are enrolled in the township, and one hundred teachers are employed. Special supervisors, manual training, music and drawing teachers chit all the schools at stated intervals, thereby giving equal advantages to the children regardless of the school they attend. The members of the Board of Education, consisting of Howard A. Tappen, president; E. C. Ensign, H. R. Valentine, Fred Bohlen, Charles S. Farrell, Maurice P. Dunigan, Melvin Clum, Louis Meyer, and A. B. Walling, have been absolutely loyal to the best educational interests of the township, acting in perfect harmony with the supervising principal, Professor Love. The Woodbridge township school system has no superior in the State.

Professor Love is a member of Township Professional Circle (president); the Supervising Principals' Association, of Middlesex county; the State Teachers' Association ; State Council of Education, and the National Teachers' Association. He is a member and past master of Americus Lodge, No. 831, Free and Accepted Masons, and was formerly a member of other fraternal organizations which pressing duties com. pelted him to relinquish. He is president of Woodbridge Chapter of the American Red Cross; senior warden of Trinity Episcopal Church, and in politics is a Republican, serving on the election board of District No. i.

During the War of 1917-18, Professor Love was commissioned second lieutenant of Company A, Woodbridge, New Jersey, State Militia Reserve, that company rendering notable service at the time of the great explosion of munitions at Morgan, near Woodbridge.
Professor Love married, in 1893, Anna H. Newcomer, of Columbia, Pennsylvania, daughter of Emanuel and Christiana (Hornberger) Newcomer, of an ancient and honorable Pennsylvania family. Six children were born to Professor and Mrs. Love : Verna B., married William E. *Lape, and resides in Evanston, Illinois; Gregory W., who during the World War, 1917-18, served in France as gunner's mate with Naval Battery, No. 4; Marian B., residing at home; Victor N., who served in the United States navy on the submarine chaser "Narada" during the World War ; Edgar, and Ruth J., both high school students..

In 1901 Professor Love received from Illinois Wesleyan University the degree of Ph. B., and other honors have been conferred upon him for his work as an educator. This brief record of the life of John H. Love reveals a man of high ideals and devotion to every duty, professional or civic. He has won a host of friends in his adopted town, and is as favorably as he is widely known.

DANIEL POTTER OLMSTEAD.—,In his Vermont home, St. Albans, Daniel P. Olmstead, president of the Evening News Company, of Perth Amboy, spent his youth, finished his school years and learned the printer's trade. His experience in the printing shop of. the St. Albans "Messenger" was supplemented by a period with a large printing house in New York City, his residence in Perth Amboy beginning at the close of that period, February, 1898. From that date he has been intimately connected with the publishing business of Perth Amboy.

Olmstead is an ancient English name of local significance, meaning a place or town by the green oaks; from Holm, an oak, and stead, a place. It is found under varied forms of spelling—Olmsted, Olmstead, Omsted, Homestead, Holmsted, Homsted, etc., but all of the early New England families of the name descend from James Olmsted, born in England, who came to Boston in the ship "Lion," September 16, 1632. In 1636 he went with the colony from Massachusetts and was one of the original settlers and proprietors of Hartford, Connecticut, where he died. He was evidently a man of means, as in his will he bequeathed fifty pounds to the Hartford church. Descendants settled in all parts of New England, this branch settling in Vermont, where Myron B. Olmstead was living at the time of the birth of his son, Daniel P. Olmstead.

Daniel Potter Olmstead, only son of Myron B. and Mary (Potter) Olmstead, was born in St. Albans, Vermont, May 7, 1871. He completed public school study with graduation from high school and soon afterward entered the employ of the St. Albans "Messenger" as printer's apprentice, serving a term of four years. The next five years were spent with a large printing establishment of New York City, following which he located in February, 1898, at Perth Amboy, New Jersey, going there to take charge of the job printing department of the old Perth Amboy "Republican." He became financially interested in the "Republican," and continued with its job printing department for five years, becoming president of the newly organized Evening News Company, in 1903. The Perth Amboy "Evening News" has become the leading daily newspaper of Middlesex county, and since its foundation the company has been under the executive management of Mr. Olmstead, a practical printer and publisher.

Mr. Olmstead is a member of the board of directors of the Perth Amboy Savings Institution, a director and member of the finance committee of the Young Men's Christian Association, and ex-president of the old Board of Trade, and interested in all that pertains to the welfare of his city. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of the Masonic order, affiliated with Raritan Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, and Amboy Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, having filled the office of high priest of the chapter. He is a vestryman of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, and a member of the Colonia Country, East Jersey, and Raritan Yacht clubs.
Mr. Olmstead married, in Brooklyn, New York, August 31, 1898, Frances Charters, born in Brooklyn, daughter of David J. and Alice -(Stevenson) Charters, her father deceased, her mother a present resident of Brooklyn. The Charters family is of English descent.
 

RAYMOND R. MOORE.—For forty years prior to his passing, in 0199, Ellis F. Moore was engaged in business in Woodbridge, New Jersey, as a general merchant and hardware dealer of the firm F. & E. F. -Moore, Hardware, dating from 1871. For thirteen years that firm, composed of Franklin and Ellis F. Moore, brothers, continued in business, Franklin Moore then selling his interest and withdrawing. As his sons came to suitable years, Ellis F. Moore admitted them to the business and when, in 1899, he was called to his reward, those sons, Raymond R. and Lawrence Moore, bought the interest of the other heirs, and the hardware business, with a Moore at its head, is continued in Woodbridge until the present, 1921, the firm name E. F. Moore & Sons.

Ellis F. Moore was a son of Lawrence Moore, who was born on Staten Island, New York, January 1o, i8o1, but at the age of thirteen
crossed the narrow water that separates the island from New York, and henceforth made his home in the latter State. He learned the wheel-wright's trade, and in 1837 permanently settled in Woodbridge, Middlesex county, New Jersey, where he died August 15, 1864. He conducted a very prosperous business in Woodbridge until his death, when his son succeeded him in the management of the business. Lawrence Moore married, March i 1, 1823, Ann Hutchinson, who long survived him, she dying September 29, 1880. They were the parents of six sons and a daughter: Daniel, died in early childhood ; William Henry, died at the age of twenty-three years; Francis, died in early childhood ; Lawrence, a carriage maker; Franklin, a carriage maker; Martha Ann, married, August 7, 1859, Isaac H. Harned ; Ellis F., of further mention.

Ellis F. Moore, youngest son of Lawrence and Ann (Hutchinson) Moore, was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, September 21, 1846, and died in the town of his birth, April 26, 1899. After his school years were over, he embarked on a business career, being but thirteen years of age when, in 1859, he became a mercantile clerk, becoming later a merchant in his own right and head of a general hardware business. He was twenty-five years of age when he and his brother, Franklin, founded the hardware business of F. and E. F. Moore (previously mentioned), of which, in 1884, he became sole owner and head, continuing until his death fifteen years later, leaving sons to succeed him and perpetuate the name Moore, which was brought to Woodbridge in 1837 by Lawrence Moore, his father. Ellis F. Moore married Rose Vennetee, and this review will now follow the career of their son, Raymond R. Moore, his father's successor in business, and of the third generation of this family in business in Woodbridge.

Raymond R. Moore was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, August 31, 1878, and there completed a public school course, after which he pursued a course of study in a New. Jersey Business College, Newark, New Jersey, finishing with the graduating class of 1896. He was at once taken into the hardware store then owned and conducted by his honored father, Ellis F. Moore, and for three years he was a bookkeeper in that store, but was given every opportunity to become familiar with the detail of the business. Ellis F. Moore died in 1899, and in the settlement of the estate Raymond R. and Lawrence Moore purchased the hardware business founded by their father and uncle in 1871, and continued it under the firm name of E. F. Moore & Sons. The brothers operated the business as a partnership until 1918, when Lawrence Moore withdrew his interest, it being purchased by Raymond R. Moore who now, in the fiftieth anniversary year of its founding, is sole owner of the business which in that time has not been out of the Moore name. His store is now located at the corner of Main and Fulton streets, Woodbridge, but previous to 1918 was at No. 87 Main street for thirty-two years, the original store of F. & E. F. Moore having been on Green street (1871), next •to the Masonic Hall. That building prior to 1871 had been in use as a store since 1856 and there, in 1859, Ellis F. Moore began his mercantile career as clerk. The business, of which Raymond R. Moore is the owner and head, is the only one with which he has ever been connected. He came to it in 1896 fresh from business college, and enjoyed the years of business training under his honored father before being called to its management. He was a youth of eighteen when he entered his father's employ, twenty-one when he became a partner with his brother Lawrence, forty when he became sole owner, and now, at the age of forty-three, has no other business interests. He has won the same high standing and business reputation that his father enjoyed, and is one of the representative men of his community.

When the outbreak of war between the United States and Spain, in 1898, called upon the manhood of the nation, Mr. Moore responded by enlistment in the Third Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers. He enlisted at Elizabeth, New Jersey, and was honorably discharged at Pompton Lakes, New Jersey, November 2, 1898. He enlisted as a private and rose through successive promotions to the rank of captain of his company. When again, in 1917, the president's call went out for men to protect American honor and interests, and fight in the cause of justice and right, Captain Moore, although exempted by years, responded and was commissioned captain of Company C, Second Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, and served from March 28, 1917, until February 6, 1919, when he was honorably discharged and mustered out at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, a veteran of two wars.

Captain Moore is affiliated with Americus Lodge, No. 83, Free and Accepted Masons, of Woodbridge; Woodbridge Lodge, No. '53, Knights of Pythias; Rahway Lodge, No. 1075, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and Trinity Protestant. Episcopal Church of Woodbridge. Politically he is independent in his action, and scrutinizes with a keen interest the men who present themselves for public office and the measures they endorse. He is public-spirited and progressive, while in patriotism he is of the finest quality, as has been proven.

Mr. Moore married, in February, 1908, Bertha M. Mundy, her parents former residents of Woodbridge. Captain and Mrs. Moore are the parents of three sons: Ellis F. (2), Raymond R. (2), and John C. Moore.
 

M. BURR MANN.—There is no more vital factor in the community than that of public education. The training of the youthful mind in the formulative stage along those lines which will prove most beneficial to it in later life is a task which to the community is a large and life-sized problem. The more intelligent and capable the men into whose hands the direction of education is given, the greater the value to themselves, and the world is the recipient of their training. The improvement in the quality of education and preliminary training has increased a hundredfold within the past few decades, due to an awakening on the part of the people to the absolute necessity of a good foundation on which to begin a career, and due also in a large degree to the demand for especially trained experts. In every city throughout the entire country are to be found schools of high standing, and at the head of these schools are to be found educators of the highest order. M. Burr Mann is one of these successful educators, and not only is Mr. Mann prominent in his profession, but in the public affairs of Dunellen he also takes a keen and active interest.

M. Burr Mann was born in Fulton, New York, April t88o, the son of Almerien and Hannah (Chapman) Mann. He received the elementary portion of his education in the public schools of his native place, and after graduating from the high school there, he prepared himself for college, and in 0199 matriculated at Cornell University, from which institution he was graduated in 1903. Upon completing a course there, he showed himself to be a student of more than ordinary ability, and he had no difficulty in securing a position as a teacher. His ability in handling the pupils of a school soon brought him to the notice of educational authorities, and he came to have a reputation of being well qualified in the teaching profession. In 1917 he received the offer of a position as superintendent of the Dunellen public school, which afforded him greater opportunities for advancement, and he accepted it, remaining in that position ever since. Under his direction, the schools have been brought to a much higher standard of efficiency.

In addition to his interests in the world of education and literature, Mr. Mann is prominent in the local fraternal organizations, among them •being the Free and Accepted Masons, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he also holds membership in the local Republican Club. His religious affiliations are with the Presbyterian church, and both he and Mrs. Mann attend the First Presbyterian Church of Dunellen.

On October iS, 1904, M. Burr Mann was united in marriage with Anna Lee. Pitcher, daughter of the Rev. Charles W. and Anna (Amerman) Pitcher. Mr. and Mrs. Mann are the parents of one child, Gwendolin, born December 31, 1906.
 

PAUL REUSCH.—A resident of Dunellen, president of the First National Bank of Dunellen, Mr. Reusch is properly to be named. among the representative citizens of his section of the State, his life, upright and honorable, industrious and energetic,•commanding for him the confidence and respect of his fellowmen in an unusual degree.

Paul Reusch is a native of New York City, his birth occurring February 16, 7855, a son of Conrad and Mary Anna (Trust) Reusch, natives of Germany, from which country they emigrated to the New World in early life, about i845. Conrad Reusch became a well-to-do baker in New York City before it became the city of the present day, with its millions of inhabitants, the greater part of them having to depend upon of his line of work for their daily sustenance. The son, Paul Reusch, was a student in a pay .school during his boyhood, there gaining a thorough knowledge of the English and German languages, this knowledge proving of value to him in his active career. For a number of years he gave his attention to the trade and business his father followed, that of a baker, in which he became an expert, and subsequently, desiring a wider and broader field for his talents and abilities, became interested in banking, in 1907, his ,cene of labor being the First National Bank of Dunellen, in which he advanced in rank from time to time, first as a director and finally being chosen to serve in the capacity of president, the duties of which he faithfully performed, his service being of inestimable value to the men connected with him in the enterprise. Mr. Reusch follows the tenets of the Presbyterian church, gives his allegiance to the candidates of the Republican party, and is affiliated, fraternally with the Order of Foresters and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics.

Mr. Reusch married, November 18, 1883, in Warrenville, Somerset county, New Jersey, Catherine Williams, born in Warrenville, March 7, 1864, a daughter of Peter and Catherine (Friday) Williams, the former named having been born in Germany, from whence he came to the United States at the age di sixteen, here following the occupation of farming throughout the active years of his life, and the latter named a native of New York City. Mr. and Mrs. Reusch are the parents of two children : Anna Elizabeth, born February 25, 1891, and Paul Edward, born August 29, 1898. The family residence, a fine house containing twelve rooms, modern in its appointments, equipped with everything necessary for the comfort of its inmates, and surrounded by well kept lawns and fruit trees of every description, was purchased by Mr. Reusch in 1911; it is located at No. 611 Washington avenue, Dunellen.
 

ALBERT H. BOWERS.—Early developing mechanical tastes and talent, Mr. Bowers, through apprenticeship and experience, became a skilled worker in metal. In the capacity of toolmaker, he first came to Woodbridge in 1910, later advancing to superintendent of the McClellan Lines Company, and subsequently becoming owner of his own business, under the name of A. H. Bowers.

Mr. Bowers is a son of Charles and Elizabeth (Clark) Bowers, and grandson of Thomas Bowers, born in England, an artist, who came to the United States and settled in Syracuse, New York, subsequently going to Trenton, New Jersey, where he died. It is said that Thomas Bowers painted the scenery for the first presentation of the play "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Charles Bowers was born during residence of the family in Syracuse, New York. He was educated in Trenton, New Jersey, but afterwards settled permanently in Rahway, New Jersey, where his son, Albert H., was born. Elizabeth (Clark) Bowers was a daughter of Jesse and Rebecca (Leob) Clark, and a lineal descendant of Abraham Clark, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Albert H. Bowers was born in Rahway, New Jersey, February 19, 1885, and there attended the public schools. At an early age he began learning the machinist's trade, at the same time attending the evening sessions of Trainer's Business College, Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He was graduated from business college in 1906, and having completed his years of apprenticeship at the trade, he left Perth Amboy and during the next four years was employed in different machine shops in New Jersey towns. In 1910 he entered the employ of the McClellan Lines Company, of Woodbridge, as a toolmaker, soon advancing to the position of shop foreman. He was later made plant superintendent, and in 1915 succeeded to the ownership of the business, and the name was then changed to A. H. Bowers. He manufactures locomotive and automobile accessories, hoists, cranes and other machinery. During the World's War period the plant was engaged exclusively in the manufacture of tools and machinery for the loading of shells and other ammunition. The plant is located at Freeman street and the Pennsylvania Railroad, twenty-five men being continuously employed. The products have become well known to the trade, and the business is a prosperous one.

Mr. Bowers is a Republic: in politics, and takes a deep interest in the affairs of the community in which he is highly esteemed. He is a member of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics; with his family he attends the services of the Woodbridge Presbyterian Church.

Mr. Bowers married, in Rahway, New Jersey, June 27, 1907, Amelia Schaefer, daughter of Michael and Amelia (West) Schaefer, her father engager' in mercantile life in Rahway. The West family is of Colonial ancestry, seated since early days in South Jersey and Delaware. Mr. and Mrs. Bowers are the parents of two children: Albert, born May 3o, 1909; Mildred, born December 19, 19/5.
 

WILLIAM CARMAN.—Now living retired at his home in Menlo Park, New Jersey, enjoying to the full the fruits of his long years of honest and honorable endeavor, this being a natural sequence, William Carman can review the past with satisfaction and enjoyment, realizing that the part he took in the affairs of his adopted town were for its betterment and uplift along many lines. He is also well known throughout Middlesex county, and is one of her foremost citizens.

William Carman was born in Metuchen, New Jersey, August 31, 1849, a son of Melancthon and Ann Maria (Ayres) Carman, the former named having been a prosperous lumber dealer and the operator of a saw mill located in Newark, New Jersey, which enterprises he conducted in a thoroughly reliable manner for many years. In 186o Melancthon Carman erected a house for the use of himself and family in Menlo Park, and this has been the family homestead to the present time (192o), a period of sixty years.

William Carman was a student in the public schools of Newark, completing his course in the high school of that city. For many years after engaging in his business career he was identified with the drug trade in Newark and Jersey city, later entering the employ of Thomas Edison, the noted inventor, serving as clerk in his office for a period of six years, at Menlo Park, after which he was elected to the office of sheriff for Middlesex county, in which capacity he served for three years, and the following four and a half years he filled the office of under sheriff. Subsequently he was a member of the County Tax Board for three years. The duties pertaining to these various positions he performed in a capable manner, winning the commendation of all concerned.

Mr. Carman is a Presbyterian in religion, and interested in the work of the church of that-denomination in Metuchen ; a Republican in politics, and a thirty-second degree Mason, serving as past grand commander of New Jersey.

Mr. Carman married, April 11, 1872, Mary E. Bryson, a native of .Newark, New Jersey, born November io, 1850, daughter of James and Jane E. Bryson, of Newark, New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Carman are the parents of five children : 1. George E., married Josephine Flannigan, of Metuchen, New Jersey. 2. Caroline A., married Ambrose Mundy, of Metuchen, and they have five children : Caroline C., Marion, Stanley, Mildred, and Carman. 3. William, Jr., now at home with his parents. 4. Albert S., married Margaret Edson, of Ramsey, New Jersey. 5. May, a twin of Albert S., now (1921) at home with her parents.
 

HAROLD E. PICKERSGILL, printer, publisher and public official, of Perth Amboy, is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Gilberton, Schuylkill county, August 8, 1872, son of the Reverend Eli and Phoebe (McCracken) Pickersgill, both of whom are yet living, at Port Carbon, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania. The father is a native of England, and the mother of Mount Bethel, Northampton county, Pennsylvania. The Rev. Eli Pickersgill is a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and his ministerial life has been passed in Eastern Pennsylvania, covering the long period of fifty-eight years. He has but recently retired from pastoral work, but on occasion continues to preach in neighborhood churches.

Harold E. Pickersgill, after passing through graded and high public schools, entered the employ of the Lehigh Valley and Philadelphia & Reading railroads, in a clerical capacity. While so occupied, and previous to that time, he gave his night hours .to work in a printing office, taking on all the duties of compositor and pressman, and also performing reportorial work, acquiring an experience which was soon to bring him into an independent active career. At the age of nineteen he had become a well equipped general printer, and he relinquished his railroad position and took employment in the printing office of Wilbur La Roe, in Perth Amboy. After a year he purchased his employer's interest in his weekly paper, the "Perth Amboy Chronicle," which he conducted for a year, then reselling to Mr. La Roe, and reentering his employ, an association which was maintained for several years. In 1910 Mr. Pickersgill established a printing business of his own, in which he still continues.

In connection with his printing business he issues a unique weekly newspaper, "The Jersey Mosquito," which enjoys much more than a local fame. Associated with him in this business is an only son, Richard H. Pickersgill. Mr. Pickersgill is recognized as an unusually faithful authority not only on local history, but on that of the State; in the former respect, the publishers of this "History of Middlesex County" gratefully acknowledge his valuable aid. He has a penchant for ancient works of historical and literary worth, and upon his shelves are many rare volumes acquired in the closing up of old family estates, and from metropolitan book sales. In these lines he is well known throughout the State.

Mr. Pickersgill has rendered efficient public service as recorder of Perth Amboy, in which position he is now serving his ninth term, and his sixth term as justice of the peace. In politics he is a Republican, and he is an active member of various clubs and lodges in which he has held official position.

Mr. Pickersgill married, in Perth Amboy, in 1894, Margaret J. Bolmer, daughter of William S. and Josephine (Bloodgood) Bolmer, of Rahway, New Jersey.
 

CHARLES KUNTZ.—About the year 189o, Isaac and Edith Kuntz came from their home in Russia to the United States, locating in New York City. They were the parents of three sons: Abraham M., a business man of New York City; Charles, of further mention ; and Henry, a lawyer and member of the New York bar.

Charles Kuntz, seeking a residence in harmony with his scientific pursuits, chose Iselin, in Middlesex county, New Jersey, and there acquired a country residence and land suitable for farm and experimental purposes. There he has made his home, amid pleasant surroundings, his brother Henry also residing there. His time is given to scientific study and research and to the management of the farm. There is a practical side-to his scientific study; indeed, the results he has attained in. poultry raising and egg production have thoroughly established the fact that science and the farm are intimately related and should be the closest allies. But Mr. Kuntz is essentially the student, and should be regarded as an educator, for his studies in sociology and philosophy are of a serious nature. Notwithstanding his reserved and retiring nature, he is well known and highly regarded.

Near Kiev, a fortified city of European Russia, the capital of the government of Kiev, on the Dnieper river, a city of venerable churches and monasteries called the "mother of Russian cities," Charles Kuntz was born, January i6, 187o. He attended gymnasium and university at Kiev, his term at the university covering a year's study. After Kiev, he entered upon a course of philosophical study at the University of Vienna, which covered a period of three years. In 1892 he entered the University of Switzerland at Zurich for courses in chemistry and science, and in 1894 came to the United States and here chose Columbia University in which to pursue study in political science, philosophy and sociology. In 1899 he devoted much time to the study of anthropology at the British Museum in London, returning to the United States in 19o1, locating again in New York City. Since 1904 his home has been at his farm in Iselin, where he combines his study with practical experiment, his poultry farm, devoted to pure-bred white leghorns, being known among poultry fanciers. The farm is the joint property and home of Charles and Henry Kuntz.
 

CHARLES A. CAMPBELL.—This name has long been a prominent and honored one in Woodbridge, New Jersey, and its perpetuation is provided for in a third Charles A. Campbell, son of Charles A. (2), and grandson of Charles A. (i) Campbell, all born in Woodbridge. Charles A. (i ) Campbell was a very successful business man, public-spirited, progressive and useful. He was succeeded by his son, Charles A. (2) Campbell, also a business man of prominence in both New York and Woodbridge, whose public spirit and progressiveness rivals that of his father. Charles A. (3), one of the town's younger set, proved his mettle by military service with the American Expeditionary Force in France, ranking as captain of infantry.

Charles A. (i ) Campbell, son of John H. Campbell, was born in Woodbridge township, Middlesex county, New Jersey, June 2, 1836, died in Woodbridge, New Jersey, July 2, 188i. He was educated in the public schools, and through wide courses of reading attained a remarkable degree of learning. John H. Campbell, his father, was a farmer of Woodbridge township, and at the age of fourteen the boy, Charles A., began working on his father's farm and continued his assistant in farm work until eighteen years of age. He then spent ten years in business in Metuchen, New Jersey, then, in 1864, he engaged in the clay business in Woodbridge, but a year later sold out to engage in other matters. In 1867 he returned to the business of clay mining and other activities under the firm name of C. A. Campbell & Company, and also was interested financially in the Staten Island Kaolin Company, an extensive clay mining and manufacturing company. Mr. Campbell became one of the prominent successful business men of his town, having many and varied interests. He was one of the founders of the Middlesex County Bank of Perth Amboy and a member of its first board of directors, and a director of the Amboy Savings Institution. Men recognized his strong business ability, and his opinions were deferred to.

A Democrat in politics, he held many positions of public trust. He was a judge of elections, member of the township committee, a freeholder, commissioner of appeals, school trustee, and in 1875 he was elected by his party to represent 'his district in the New Jersey Assembly. He served with honor in that body, then returned again to private life and was ever one of the most eminent and representative citizens of Woodbridge. At one time he was president of the Masonic Hail Association of Woodbridge, president of the board of trustees of the Congregational church, and during his residence in Woodbridge built many fine residences and other structures within town limits.

Charles A. Campbell married, in Woodbridge, in 1855, Susan L. Clarkson, daughter of Noel Clarkson, of Woodbridge. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell were the parents of three children: Lizzie, who died young; Susan, now residing at the old family home, unmarried; and Charles A. (2), of further mention.

Charles A. (2) Campbell was born August 24, 1865, and is now connected with the Ostermoor Mattress Company of New York. He is a director of the First National Bank of Woodbridge; president of the Woodbridge Masonic Hall Association; at one time was a member of the Woodbridge Board of Education; is president of the board of trustees of the Woodbridge Congregational Church; ex-president of the Woodbridge Athletic Association ; a Democrat in politics and a former freeholder, representing Woodbridge township, and otherwise prominent in local affairs. Mr. Campbell married Bertha M. Connors, of Woodbridge, and they are the parents of two children : 1. Charles A. (3), who as a captain in the sth Regiment of Infantry, r all Division, American Expeditionary Force, served in France during the World War, 1917-1918; he married Marion Segoine, of Point Pleasant, New Jersey. 2. Mary M., married Francis A. Chidsey, of Easton, Pennsylvania, a graduate of Lafayette College. Mr. Chidsey also served with the American Expeditionary Force in France, holding a lieutenant's commission. Mr. and Mrs. Chidsey are the parents of a son, Francis A. (2).
 

AXEL SOPHUS OLSEN.—There is something in the spirit of the American Government and of the American Nation which wins the loyal support of all its adopted sons. Its freedom from monarchical rule, its advantages for progress and improvement, unhampered by caste, seems to call forth the best efforts of those who come here to seek homes, and many rise to positions of importance in the business world and other fields of industry. This has been eminently the case with Axel Sophus Olsen, office manager and purchasing agent of the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company.

Thomas Ferdinand Olsen, father of Axel Sophus Olsen, was born in Denmark, December 27, 1838, and died in England in 1892. He had been a sailor from boyhood, and during the latter years of his life was a captain of an English steamer. He married Anna Maria Fallam, a native of Throndhjem, Norway, and they were the parents of an only child, Axel Sophus Olsen. Mrs. Olsen died in England when the boy Axel S. was very young.

Axel Sophus Olsen, son of Thomas Ferdinand and Anna Maria Fallam) Olsen, was born in Thorndhjem, Norway, June 30, 1871. He was educated in the schools of Denmark, and at the age of twenty-two came to the United States and immediately settled in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where he soon found employment as a clerk in a general store. On January 24, 1899, he first associated himself with the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company, securing the position of timekeeper. It was through a quick ability to take advantage of opportunities that Mr. Olsen made himself of great value to his employers and rapidly made his way up through the positions of chief clerk, purchasing agent, and office manager to the place of prominence which he holds at the present time, that of office manager and purchasing agent of the Perth Amboy Dry. Dock Company. His success has been due to his tireless energy and industry, together with the training which qualified him for fulfilling the duties of his present office. Politically Mr. Olsen is an Independent, voting for the candidate he believes best fitted for the office regardless of party label. He affiliates with the Lutheran church in Perth Amboy, and his club is the Raritan Yacht. His best efforts are always given to the advancement of whatever in his judgment tends to the furtherance of the welfare of the city. He is treasurer of the Danish Children's Home, and has been on its board of managers since 1912.

Mr. Olsen married, September 2o, 1899, Ellen la Cour, a native of Denmark, but of French descent, a daughter of Niels and Anina (Jacobsen) la Cour, both of Denmark. Mrs. Olsen came to the United States with her father and mother in 1892, they locating at once in Perth Amboy, where with the exception of five years spent in Brooklyn they have always resided. Mr. and Mrs. Olsen are the parents of three children: Olaf la Cour, born June 26, 1900, now attending Syracuse University, a member of the class of 1923; Norman la Cour, born October 20, 1903, also a student in Syracuse University, class of 1924; Gertrude Anina la Cour, born December 12, 1910. During the few hours that Mr. Olsen can spare from his ever increasing business duties he takes great delight in long walks and in boating.
 

DAVID CAMPBELL PREACHER, now master mechanic and chief engineer of the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company, was born at Colmonell, Scotland, June 7, 1870, son of David Campbell and Elizabeth (Craig) Preacher, his father a forester. He secured a good public school education in the local schools and a mechanical education in the night schools. At the age of sixteen, he began an apprenticeship with the Dalmellington Iron Company, in Ayr, Scotland, and became well advanced as a machinist and engineer before sailing for the United States, October 16, x889. Twelve days later, he arrived in New York, going thence to Perth Amboy, where he engaged as a machinist with the firm of Schann & Eckert. In January, 1899, he was appointed superintendent of the Lea Machine Works, of New Brunswick, New Jersey, and in 1901 accepted the position of superintending engineer with the Blue Mountain & Raquette Lake Steamboat Company, of Raquette Lake, New York. In 1905 he came to his present position with the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company, Perth Amboy, New Jersey.

Mr. Preacher became a citizen of the United States at New. Brunswick, New Jersey, August 16, 1898. He is a member of the Universal Craftsmen's Council of Engineers of Trenton, New Jersey; Lawrence Lodge, No. 62, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Perth Amboy; and is a thirty-second degree Mason, being a member of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, New Jersey Consistory. His club is the Perth Amboy Caledonian, his religious faith, Presbyterian. 

At Ferth Amboy, December 31, 1896, Mr. Preacher married Janet Yule Donaldson Grieve, daughter of John and Agnes Grieve. Mr. and Mrs. Preacher are the parents of four sons: r. Dav:1 Campbell, born at New Brunswick, New Jersey, November 12, 1899; he served during the World War as a second-class machinist on the battleship "Montana." He was honorably discharged when the armistice was signed, and is now employed by the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company. 2. George, born at Perth Amboy, New Jersey, September 28, 1903. 3. John, born at Perth Amboy, January 13, 1907. 4. Hugh James, born in Perth Amboy, November 23, 1916. Mr. Preacher is a mechanic of skill and ability, a man of forceful character, a good manager, and loyal to his obligations as employee and citizen. He is highly esteemed in his community.
 

WILLIAM HENRY BLACK.—The charm of the sea reaches into every little inlet that feels the sweep of the tide, and throws a spell of interest over the life history of every one whose work is connected with it. William Henry Black, superintendent of the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company, spent the greater part of his life in the ship building centers of the Maine coast, actively engaged in the construction of sailing vessels.

Thomas Black, father of William H. Black, wan born in the North of Ireland, and came to Phippsburg Center, Maine, ninety years ago. He was a farmer, an upright, hard working man. He died in the same seaside village, in 1884, at the age of eighty years and six months. He married Sarah Black, who was also born in Ireland, and she died in 1892, three months past the eighty-year mark. They had a good old  fashioned family of ten children, of whom two are still living: Mrs. Mary Bowker, of Bath, Maine; and William Henry, who was the youngest of the family.

William Henry Black was born in Phippsburg Center, Maine, March 31, 1858. He attended the public school of the village, and until twenty years of age helped his father on the farm. But the ship building operations constantly going on in* the village were a source of great interest to the young man, and when twenty years old he left the farm to learn the ship carpenter's trade. He remained at Phippsburg Center following this trade for ten years. When he was thirty •years old he took his savings and went to Bath, Maine. There he bought a house, and entered the employ of William M. Rogers, as master shipbuilder, later•on going to the firm of Arthur Sewell & Company in the same capacity. While he was with the latter firm he built the ship, "William P. Fry," which was torpedoed by the Germans during the World War. Also 'at the Sewell yards he built four steel vessels. He was later connected with the ship yards at Waldoboro, Maine. During his stay there he built four schooners known as the "White Fleet." Still later, in Brewer, Maine, he built two schooners for the I. K. Stedman Company. With all this valuable experience in ship construction, he was peculiarly fitted for the position which he now fills as superintendent of the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company. He came to this city in 1905, and has been continuously in the employ of this concern ever since, holding the position of superintendent since 1911. Mr. Black's time is largely absorbed by his work, but his interests are broad. His personal tastes lead him out-of-doors for recreation and relaxation, and he takes great delight in fine horses, having always owned a fast horse in Maine.

Mr. Black married, October 8, 1881, in Bath, Maine, Jennie P. Morse, daughter of Scott and Pauline (Shay) Morse. She was born in Bath, and both her parents died there. Mr. and Mrs. Black are the parents of two children, both living: 1. Roberta, born February 8, 1886, the wife of Fred Whitney, of Perth Amboy ; she conducts a corset store, known as the Gossard Corset Shop, on Smith street. 2. C. Howard, born October 17, 0389, manager of the Woolworth Five and Ten Cent Store in Perth Amboy ; he is single ; he served in the United States army for nine months of the recent World War. The family have always attended the Methodist Episcopal church.
 

WILLIAM JOHN RANKIN.—The story of the career of William John Rankin is the story of obstacles overcome and fine ambitions achieved through sheer dint of perseverance. That he has won his way to the front ranks of Perth Amboy is due to the innate force of character of the man who took the difficulties with a certain zest in the effort and that this confidence was not misplaced is shown by the records of things done.

Alexander M. Rankin, father of William John Rankin, was born in Scotland, and came to Prince Edward Island with his parents when he was very young. He was a ship builder by trade. He died in Perth Amboy, in 1904, at the age of eighty-four years. He married Lydia Louise Harding, a native of Prince Edward Island. Mrs. Rankin died in Perth Amboy, in 1910, at the age of eighty-four years. To Mr. and Mrs. Rankin were born ten children, eight of whom are still alive: Elizabeth, Katherine, James, Jessie, Mary, William John, of this review; Collin, and Gilman.

William John Rankin was born in Alberton, Prince Edward Island, November 12, 1862. He obtained hi, education in the local public schools. At the age of eighteen he went to Bath, Maine, and from there followed the sea for seven years, filling practically every position on a sailing vessel to that of captain, in which capacity he was serving at the time he took his position of carpenter and rigger with the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company in 1890. In 1907 he established himself in business, and while thus engaged built two dry docks, but in 1919 he again returned to the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Company in the position of superintendent, which office he holds at the present time, 1921.

In politics Mr. Rankin is a Republican, and at one time served as alderman from the old Third Ward. He is prominent in Masonic circles, and is a member of Raritan Lodge, No. 6o, Free and Accepted Masons ; Perth Amboy Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Empire Conunandery, No. 66, Knights Templar; Jerusalem Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; and Louisiana Consistory, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. He is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

On November 1 1, 1887, Mr. Rankin was united in marriage with Christian McKay, and they are the parents of five children : Collin D., born February 13, 1889; Ella and Joseph, twins, both deceased ; James, deceased; Martha L., wife of Samuel G. Fugua.
 

CHARLES H. HINGHER, as secretary-treasurer of the Edward Hingher Company, Nos. 116-122 Neilson street, New Brunswick, occupies an influential place in a business founded by his honored father, Edward Hingher, in 1872. Edward Hingher was born in Rittenberg, Germany, in 1832, but when young went to France, where he became an expert cabinetmaker. In 1854 he came to the United States, worked in New York, and in Savannah, Georgia, and in 1861, located in New Brunswick, New Jersey, where in 1872 he became a manufacturer of furniture as a member of the firm, Deisenreider & Hingher. They started business in a small plant at No. 47 Albany street, but two years later a fire swept away the plant ; Mr. Deisenreider did not continue, leaving Mr. Hingher to resume or not as he pleased. He decided to resume and as a beginning bought the lot on Neilson street and erected a building too large for his then business, but which later filled its every story and room. As his sons, Charles H. and Edward, came to suitable years, they
were admitted to the business, eventually succeeding their father, who continued head of the business until the years grew too heavy and he retired.

Charles H. Hingher, son of Edward Hingher, was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, May 16, 1877, consequently he is five years younger than the business with which he has been connected since 1897. He was educated in New Brunswick public schools and Wilson's Business College, and at the age of twenty became associated with his father in the furniture business at the same location which the Edward Hingher Company now occupies. The business was incorporated, April 21, 1916, and is one of the leading furniture houses of New Brunswick, Charles H. Hingher, secretary and treasurer. The company is a prosperous one and fills an important place in New Brunswick mercantile life. Mr. Hingher is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose, Knights of the Golden Eagle, the Exempt Fireman's Association, New Brunswick Board of Trade, the Young Men's Christian Association, and the Livingston Avenue Reformed Church.

Mr. Hingher married, in New Brunswick, Edna C. Johnson, and they are the parents of two daughters: Nellie Alberta and Myrtle Elizabeth.


MILLARD FILMORE ROSS, JR.—The Ross name has long been a familiar one in Middlesex county and one associated with the development of the New Jersey coast district since the days of Congressman Miles Ross, a native son of Middlesex county.
Miles Ross was born in Raritan township, April 3o, 1828, and became the most popular Democrat in his district, so popular that he held all worth while local offices, then was sent to the New Jersey Legislature, and later to the National House of Representatives. He sat in the Forty-fourth Congress, which convened December 6, 1875, and was thrice reelected, serving in all four times, covering a period of eight years. He did a great deal of his district; particularly, the shore and summer visitors to the bay district may thank him for the present boating, bathing and fishing facilities at Cheesequake creek, improvements begun and carried on for years through government appropriations secured through his influence. The family came to the United States from Scotland.

Millard Filmore Ross, son of Congressman Miles Ross, was also a prominent Democrat of New Brunswick, his native city, and was a well known wholesale dealer in coal. He married Mary M. Dixon, born in Jersey City, New Jersey, daughter of the eminent Jonathan Dixon, judge of the Supreme Court of New Iersey.

Millard Filmore Ross, Jr., son of Millard Filmore and Mary M. (Dixon) Ross, was born at the family home, No. 77 Livingston avenue, New Brunswick, New Jersey, March 15, 1898. He was educated in Rutgers Elementary School, Rutgers Preparatory School, class of 1916, and Rutgers College, leaving college in 1917, when he tried to enter the United States army for service in the war against Germany. He was rejected for military service and for the sAcceeding eleven weeks he "did his bit" with other men by driving. a farm tractor. He then made another attempt to enlist, but was again rejected. He did war work as under-foreman at the Johnson & Johnson plant. He joined the New Brunswick Cavalry Home Guard, and after fourteen unsuccessful attempts received appointment to a machine gun unit and was ordered to report at Officers' Training Camp, Camp Hancock, Georgic Before reaching Camp Hancock, the signing of the armistice ended the war and his efforts were all in vain, except to show the depth of his patriotism and the sincerity of his intention. After the war, Mr. Ross was employed for a time as an automobile salesman in New York City and New Brunswick, and on August 4, 1919, incorporated the M. F. Ross, Jr., Inc., insurance brokers, their operations extending throughout New Jersey and New York City. The officers of this corporation are: M. F. Ross, Jr., president; V. C. Ross, vice-president; George R. Morrison, treasurer; Miles Ross, secretary. The offices are located at Nos. 201- 203 Montalvo building, No. 101 Albany street, New Brunswick, and the New York City offices are at No. 8o Maiden Lane.

Mr. Ross is a member of Rutgers Chapter, Delta Kappa Epsilon ; New Brunswick Lodge, No. 324, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; the Young Men's Christian Association; the New Brunswick Boat and the New Brunswick Country clubs. His favorite sports are swimming, hunting and boxing. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian.

Mr. Ross married, in Newark, New Jersey, March 8, 1918, Laura Wesley Early, of New York City, born in Hightstown, New Jersey, daughter of Robert and Grace (Davison) Early. Mr. and Mrs. Ross are the parents of a son, Miles Ross (2), born ivlarch 28, 1919. The family home is at No. 100 Livingston avenue.
 

GEORGE A. CLINTON.—The Middlesex Granite and Marble Works of New Brunswick, New Jersey, was established more than a quarter of a century ago by the present owner, George A. Clinton, a practical stone cutter, whose vision and ambition led him to make the venture which his ability and energy has developed so successfully. He is a son of William and Lydia Clinton, who at the time of the birth of their son were residing in Brooklyn, New York. Later, Mr. Clinton moved with his family to a farm at Franklin Park, New Jersey.

George A. Clinton was born in Brooklyn, New York, October 9, 1858, but soon afterward the family moved to the farm at Franklin Park, where the lad George spent the years of his early life. He attended the public schools of the district and until reaching the age of nineteen was its father's farm assistant. But the life of a farm held no appeal for him, and opportunity offering, he left home and became a stone cutter's. apprentice in the city of New Brunswick; that was in 1877, and for forty-three years he has made that city his home and business headquarters. For sixteen years he followed his trade as apprentice and journeyman, becoming an expert marble and granite cutter. He had during these years accumulated capital sufficient to warrant starting in business for himself, and in 1893 made the venture under the firm name, The Middlesex Granite and Marble Works, located in New Brunswick. He has been very successful, 'and his monumental works are the largest in the city. Mr. Clinton is still the active head of the business he founded and is held in high regard, both as a business man and citizen. He is well known in fraternal life, is an active church worker and deeply interested in all that concerns the public good. He has served as elder in his church, also as delegate to classes.

Mr. Clinton is a Republican in politics, a member of the First Reformed Church of New Brunswick, and affiliates with New Brunswick Lodge, No. 6, Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; Palestine Lodge, No. t, Free and Accepted Masons; Good Intent Council, No. 234, Junior Order of United American Mechanics.

Mr. Clinton married, November 1, 1881, Mary Voorhees, daughter of Jacob Voorhees, of New Brunswick, and they are the parents of two sons : Elmer V., 'who married Osie Hardy, and they have one son, Elmer V., Jr., who is associated in business with his father ; and George DeWitt, also a member of his father's firm, who on February 25, 1918, entered the World War, serving with the 354th Bakery Company, was overseas, stationed at Saint Aignan, France, for some ten months, and was mustered out July 12, 1919, as corporal.


ROBERT ALLEN LUFBURROW, one of the active young business men of New Brunswick, is one of the organizers of the Highland Park Building Company, at No. 238 Cleveland avenue. Having been trained for the profession of a civil engineer, he is particularly adapted for the work in which he is now engaged.

Born in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey, December 3, 1886, Robert Allen Lufburrow is the son of Egbert Frederick and Mary H. Lufburrow. In his boyhood he attended the public school in Atlantic Highlands and later the high school, graduating in 1904. Entering Rutgers College, in the scientific course, the youth spent the next four years there and graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 3908. Some time later he reentered college in the engineering course and obtained the degree of Civil Engineer at his graduation in the class of 1913. Mr. Lufburrow's first engagement in his new profession was in the office of C. C. Vermeule, a prominent engineer of New York City, where he held the position of assistant engineer ; he afterward became an assistant in the office of Clyde Potts, also in New York City, in the work of designing and construction of water works, sewers and sewage disposal plants. At this time the Highland Park Building Company was in process of organization, and Mr. Lufburrow came to New Brunswick, September 15, 1914, as secretary and treasurer of the new concern. For a year and a half Mr. Lufburrow was absent from his post, being engaged in the United States Army during the late war, but upon his return to New Brunswick in January, 1919, he was advanced to the office of vice-president of the company, that being his position at the present time (1921). Mr. Lufburrow is also connected with the Cronk Manufacturing Company of New Brunswick, holding the office of vice-president.
When this country entered the World War, Robert Allen Lufburrow volunteered and was assigned to Fort Myer, Virginia, August 23,

1917, in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps. He was commissioned first lieutenant, October 23, 1917; while stationed at Washington, D. C., he was promoted to the rank of captain, and on January 8, 1919, was honorably discharged. During his college days Mr. Lufburrow was elected a member of the Delta Upsilon fraternity, and while living ,in Atlantic Highlands he was a member of the Board of Education of that city. Mr. Lufburrow is also affiliated with Monmouth Lodge, No. 172, Free and Accepted Masons, of Atlantic Highlands; Hiram Chapter, No.1; Royal Arch Masons, of Red Bank, New Jersey; and is active in the work of the Young Men's Christian Association, with which he is connected.

At Asbury Park, New Jersey, Robert Allen Lufburrow married, May 5, 1920, Olive Blanche Hendrickson, a native of Englishtown, New Jersey, the daughter of Harry and Neva Janet Hendrickson. Mr. and Mrs. Lufburrow attend the Livingston Avenue Baptist Church of New Brunswick.


PETER MICHAEL CLAUSEN.—Advancement in any of the learned professions is not so much the result of fortuitous circumstances or of influence, as it is the result of individual merit, application and skill. When these are combined with ambition and a fixed determination to achieve success, the desired result is inevitable. Peter Michael Clausen, although young to have achieved a reputation in this difficult profession, is fairly on the way to acquiring fame among his legal brethren.

Michael Clausen, father of Peter Michael Clausen, was born in Denmark in 1847. He came to the United States in 1b81 with his wife, Elsie (Lund) Clausen, a native of Denmark, and they immediately located in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where they have ever since resided. Mr. Clausen has retired from active business life, having formerly been an inspector for the Lehigh Valley Railroad and was also a merchant. Mr. and Mrs. Clausen are the parents of seven children : Meta, wife of Soren Johnson, of Perth Amboy, and the mother of four children; Peter, deceased; Mary, wife of Thorvald Peterson, of California, and the mother of three children; Emma N., single, a teacher in the public schools of Perth Amboy; Peter Michael, of further mention; Arthur A., in business in Perth Amboy, is married and has one child, Elsie ; Andrew A., enlisted in the United States army in the recent World War, was over- seas with Division No. 34, and would have been in active conflict within three days' time, for the order had been given, but the armistice was signed at that time.

Peter Michael Clausen, son of Michael and Elsie (Lund) Clausen, was born November 18, 1889, in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. After graduating from the local grammar schools, he attended the Perth Amboy High School for one year, and then became messenger for the Western Union Telegraph and Telephone Company, serving in this capacity for a year, at the end of which time he entered the office of Judge Homtnann, and under the latter's preceptorship studied law to such good purpose that in February, 1919, he was admitted to practice at the bar of Middlesex county and immediately began the practice of his profession in the office where he had been so effectually trained, and where he is located at the present time. It is interesting to note here that Mr. Clausen is the only man to pass the Middlesex county bar without either a high school or a college education, and holds a Regent's certificate.

In his political life Mr. Clausen is a Republican and he has actively identified himself with the local organization of that party, being now a participant in city and county politics, and it is probable that we may see him serving his community in many posts of 'responsibility and trust. Mr. Clausen is a member of the Foresters of America and the Young Men's Christian Association, and affiliates with the local Lutheran church.

Mr. Clausen married, June rx, 1914, Bertha Bosie, daughter of the late John and Barbara Bosie, both of Perth Amboy. Mr. and Mrs. Clausen are the parents of two children: Peter Michael, Jr., born May 30, 1915; Emma, born February 12, 1918.

Aside from his professional life, Mr..Clausen takes an active interest in outdoor sports and devotes much of his spare time to recreation of this sort. It is difficult to predict the future of a successful lawyer who is very young in years, but his ability and exceptional attainments seem to promise for him a brilliant future.
 

MRS. HELEN (GLIDDEN) TOMBS, a resident of Sewaren, New Jersey, traces descent from the early English family long seated at town of Glidden, Hampshire county, England, on the coast of Devonshire, a family of French and Norman descent, who came into England with the Norman Conqueror. Her home, Strathspey Hall, is the abode of hospitality and culture, her friends being many. On the maternal side, Mrs. Tombs descends from the Fisher family of England.

Helen Glidden was born in New York City, daughter of Captain Samuel G. and Martha A. H. (Fisher) Glidden, both of distinguished ancestry, traced to the early days in New England and to a remote period in English history. The Gliddens came from Glidden, Hampshire county, England, and the early settlers are said to be responsible for the name New .Hampshire, given to the territory now embraced in the State of that name, and of settling the part of Massachusetts in 1820, called Maine. Although the name Glidden was among those early settlers transported to New England, it is now numerous in New Hampshire, Maine and Ohio. These first Gliddens came from the estate of Glidden, which comprises three thousand acres, the family descending from Osbert de Gladisfen, Guruvn, etc., and first came into England in io66, with William the Conqueror. Glidden town is situated about seven miles south of Petersfield, and about twelve miles north of Portsmouth, England. Shipbuilding has been a favored business in the family, and many Gliddens have been mariners. Samuel G. Glidden was of that class, he being a master mariner. When he retired from the sea he opened an office in lower New York and became a very successful commission shipping merchant, and was a man of importance in his business until his death, in Brooklyn, at the age of fifty-three years. He was a man of culture, a college graduate, and possessed an unusually fine memory. He was a member of the New York City Chamber of Commerce, and bore a part in city affairs. In appearance he was dignified and commanding, and in manner most genial and attractive. His wife, Martha A. H. Fisher, was the- daughter of Julius and Mary Wheeler (Horton) Fisher, a descendant of Sir Daniel Fisher.

Captain Samuel G. Glidden was a son of Col. John Glidden of New Castle, Maine, a soldier of the War of 1812, who was in command of the old fort at Pemaquid, Maine, a village near the sea, about eighteen miles from the coast. The Gliddens were patriots of the Revolution and served in the earlier Colonial wars with the French and Indians.

Mrs. Helen (Glidden) Tombs was educated in Brooklyn, New York, and there resided until a few years ago. Her husband, William Henry Tombs (now deceased), was born at Rahway, New Jersey, son of William H. and Margaret (Ayres) Tombs; on the maternal side, the family is related to the Coreys and Halseys of Newark, and to the Davis's of Elizabeth, New Jersey. Mr. Tombs was an inventor and devoted his life to mechanics. Mrs. Helen (Glidden) Tombs resides at Strathspey Hall, now on the Cliff road, Sewaren, New Jersey, and she is one of the social leaders of her community. She organized the History Club of Sewaren, also the Civic Club, two organizations that have been of great value to the town. It was through the efforts put forth by Mrs. Tombs that a stone was placed at Valley Forge in "The Belfry tower" of the Memorial Cathedral there, to George Washington's memory—in the name of the History Club of Sewaren. She was an active Red Cross worker during the war period and is a generous supporter of all movements to relieve suffering or affliction. She is a member of Fort Greene Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Brooklyn, and an honorary member of Camp Middlebrook Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, of Bound Brook, New Jersey. Her societies also include membership in the New England Woman's Society, the New Jersey Historical Society, the New York Historical Society; she is a member of St. John's Protestant Episcopal Church of Sewaren.
 

JOSEPH FREDERICK WALKER.—Among the representative citizens of Perth Amboy is Joseph Frederick Walker, principal of schools No. 1 and No. 7. At the age of eighteen years Mr. Walker commenced teaching and has followed this profession ever since.
Tesscier Walker, father of Joseph F. Walker, was born in Madison township, in 1841, and died there, in 1874, at the age of thirty-three years. He engaged in farming during his lifetime. He married Jane A. Warne, who still resides in Perth Amboy. To Mr. and Mrs. Walker were born four children: Ellsworth B., collector of revenue of Perth Amboy, who died December 2, 1920; Katie, deceased; Edwin; and Joseph Frederick, mentioned below.

Joseph Frederick Walker was born in Cliffwood, Monmouth county, New Jersey, February 5, 1869, and was taken to Madison township by his parents when a baby. He obtained his elementary education in the local schools, and then entered Keyport Academy, from which he was graduated in 1887, and immediately commenced teaching. His first position was in the public schools of Morristown, New Jersey, after which he went to Freneau, New Jersey, where he taught school for four years, and subsequently was made assistant principal of the Matawan school, which he graded and reorganized. Desiring to acquaint himself more thoroughly with certain subjects he entered the State Normal School, at Trenton, New Jersey, and graduated from that institution in 1898. This same year he was elected to the position of science teacher in the Perth Amboy High School, and after three years was made principal of schools No. 1 and No. 7, at Perth Amboy. He is director and recording secretary of the local Young Men's Christian Association, is president of the Middlesex Teachers' Association, president of the Perth Amboy Teachers' Association, president of the Perth Amboy Civic League Association, and is a member of the legislative committee of the Third Congressional District of State teachers. Mr. Walker is also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; Raritan Lodge, No. 61, Free and Accepted Masons; and is a charter member of Columbia Council, No. 77, Junior Order of United American Mechanics, of Matawan, New Jersey. He is a member of the First Baptist Church of Perth Amboy, and has held the offices of trustee and treasurer for many years.

Mr. Walker's main work in the Civic League has been the enforcement of the Sunday laws, resulting in the closing of the Sunday movies and keeping them closed in spite of official opposition. He represented Middlesex county in the teachers' campaign which resulted in substantial increases in the salaries of every teacher in the State, over $6,000,000 being added in one year. In his work on the legislative committee he helped to repeal the unsound teachers' pension law and helped frame and secure the passage of the new teachers' pension and annuity fund, which is recognized as one of the soundest and best pension laws in the country.

On March 31, 1902, Mr. Walker was united in marriage with Mary Hart Hall, of Woodbridge, New Jersey. Mrs. Walker was the first teacher in Keasbey, and started the Keasbey Sunday School. She is the daughter of the late Ferdinand and Amanda (Hart) Hall. Mr. Hall was for many years superintendent of the Raritan River Clay Company. Mr. and Mrs. Walker are the parents of one child, J. Frederic Walker, born December 7, 1903.
 

HERBERT WILLIAM NAFEY, M. D.—Since 165o the 'tame of Nafey has been identified with the life of what was formerly New Amsterdam, now Greater New York, and also with New Jersey. Descendants of the founder, Johanus Nevius, or rather this branch with which we are especially interested, changed the name to Nafey, and Garrett Nafey, a direct descendant and a veteran of the Revolutionary War, lies buried in the cemetery of the First Dutch Church in New Brunswick.

Herbert William Nafey was born April 25, 1887, in New Brunswick, New Jersey, the son of Charles and Catherine A. (Ther) Nafey. His preliminary education was obtained in the public schools of his native city, after which he entered Rutgers College, from which he was gradu.ated with the degree of Bachelor of Science. Having decided in the meantime to adopt the medical profession, he accordingly matriculated in the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, and in 1914 received from this institution the degree of Doctor of Medicine, serving his interneship the following year at the Presbyterian Hospital, after which he immediately returned to New Brunswick and established himself in the practice of his profession. He is now, 1921, acting assistant surgeon of the United States Public Health Service for the New Brunswick area, and is held in the highest professional esteem.

During the World War, Dr. Nafey entered active service, July, 1917, as first lieutenant, Medical Corps, United States Army, arriving overseas, August, 1917. He became immediately attached to the British forces in France, serving with the 55th Field Ambulance in the battle of Pachendahle Ridges, November, 1917, and served during the following engagements: The second battle and retreat from Somme river, March, 1918; allied advance from Albert, July, 1918, to the fall of Cambrai, September, 1918, and the capture of Valenciennes. He was promoted to the rank of captain, Medical Corps, United States Army. He returned to the United States, April, 1919, and received his honorable discharge, April 25, 1919, realisting in the Reserve Medical Corps of the United States Army the following month with the rank of captain. He is a member of the State, county and local medical societies, the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity of Rutgers College, and the Rutgers Alumni Club. Dr. Nafey is also affiliated with the First Dutch Reformed Church of Highland Park, where he resides.

On June 6, 1917, Herbert William Nafey was united in marriage with Mary Beatrice Woodcock, daughter of the late John and Katherine Woodcock.
 

ISAAC NEWTON BLUE, JR.—Carrying the New Brunswick "Times" at the age of eight years, a "printer's devil" in the offices of the same paper at thirteen years, Isaac N. Blue may be described as having "grown up in the business," a :iteral fact, and there is perhaps no name so well known in New Brunswick as "Blue, the printer" now of the Morrison & Blue Printing Company, Incorporated. Blue is a Middlesex county family, long seated in New Brunswick, where Isaac Newton Blue, Sr., was born August 21, 1842, and yet resides there, in his seventy-ninth year. He is a carpenter by trade, though long retired, but for many years was connected with the building operations of his city. For twenty-three years he was a member of the New Jersey State Militia and has the medal awarded by the State for service rendered. He married Ellen Ryan, born in New Brunswick, July 4, 1843, now living in New Brunswick in her seventy-eighth year. Mr. and Mrs. Blue were the parents of eight children : John Henry, an expert accountant of New York City ; Margaret, married Anthony Silzer, of New Brunswick ; Isaac Newton, Jr., of further mention ; Albert L., of New Brunswick ; Charles E., of New Brunswick ; David S., deceased ; Mary L., deceased ; Frank W., deceased.

Isaac Newton Blue, Jr., was born in New Brunswick, New jersey, February 1, 1870, and attended the public schools until thirteen years of age. At the age of eight years he became a newspaper carrier, employed by A. E. Gordon, then owner of the New Brunswick "Times," and from that time forward the lad earned his own living. At the age of thirteen he left school and became a "printer's devil" in the "Times" office, then on Commerce square. He continued in the printing trade with the "Times" and other concerns until 1888, when he opened a printing office of his own, doing business as "Blue, the Printer." His first office was on Commerce square, next on Dennis street, where he remained until Koos, when the Morrison t Blue Printing Company was incorporated and their plant located at Nos. 7-13 Bethany street. The company is a well known one, printing of every description being turned out by the plant in as large or as small quantities as desired. In August, 1920, Mr. Blue purchased the interest of Mr. Morrison, and is continuing the business alone.
From 1904 until 1908, Mr. Blue was alderman from the Fifth Ward of New Brunswick, chairman of the poor committee and commissioner of police. Since 1895 he has been a member of the Junior Older of United American Mechanics; is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and exalted ruler in 1915; member of the Young Men's Christian Association; the Board of Trade, and since 1916, has been president of the Brunswick Club. In religious faith he is an Episcopalians

Mr. Blue married, in New Brunswick, June 16, 1896, Mary E. Macom, born in New Brunswick, daughter of James and Margaret Macom. .Mr. and Mrs. Blue are the parents of a daughter, Mildred Marie, born July 24, 1898, wife of Ralph Rocca, of Brooklyn, New York.
 

JOHN L. SUYDAM, M. D.—To John L. Suydam belongs the unusual record of having ministered to the physical welfare of the residents of Jamesburg and vicinity for thirty-eight years. He has attended three generations in some families, ushering them into the world and in many instances soothing their passing out of it.

John L. Suydam was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, on the farm of his parents, Abram and Letticia Suydam, October 13, 1859. He was reared, as all farmer's sons are, to assist in the farm work and to attend the town school where his early education was acquired. After finishing the course of this locale institution he entered Rutgers Preparatory School, from which he graduated, then became a student at Rutgers College, New Brunswick. Following these years of preparation, John L. Suydam took up the study of medicine, enrolling in the medical department of the University of New York in New York City, from which he was graduated in 1882. He located then in Jamesburg, his office being at present on Church street.

For many years past Dr. Suydam has taken an active part in the politics of Jamesburg, being one of the standard bearers of the Republican party. He has held several public offices, serving on the Middlesex County Board of Elections for eighteen years, and being county physician for seven years. In addition to these Dr. Suydam finds time to participate in matters fraternal, holding membership in the Junior Order of United American Mechanics and in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

The marriage of John L. Suydam and Mary E. Park took place in Jamesburg in January, 1884, Mrs. Suydam being the daughter of Thomas and Jane Park. There are no children of this union. Dr. and Mrs. Suydam are members of the Presbyterian church in Jamesburg.


JOHN JOSEPH BUCKLEY, Ph. G.—Pharmacy has been Mr. Buckley's life work, the ambition of his boyhood being realized in 1910, when he became proprietor of his own drug store, although as a partner only, the full realization of his hopes and plans not coming until five years later, when he moved to his present location, No. 219 New Brunswick avenue, Perth Amboy, and began business under his own name. He has won high standing in his profession, and as a business man his success is most marked. Hardly more than over the threshold of life, he has fully proved his quality and the future holds for him bright promise. He is a native son of Perth Amboy, his parents both born in Ireland, marrying in Orange, New Jersey, and later moving to Perth Amboy.

Michael Buckley, father of John J. Buckley, was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, but when a boy came to the United States, and at South Amboy, New Jersey, found a home and employment. He was a coal trimmer at Amboy, and there died in 1899, aged forty-eight years. He married, in Orange, New Jersey, Bridget Loretta Burns, also born in County Kilkenny, who survives, residing in Perth Amboy. Their children are: Mary, married Charles Keane, and died in South Amboy; James, died in Perth Amboy; William, a motorman of Perth Amboy ; John J., of further mention ; Margaret, married William Grace, of Woodbridge, New Jersey, and has two children : Arthur and Joseph; George Joseph, note teller with the First National Bank of Perth Amboy.

John J. Buckley was born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, November 27, 1881, and there completed courses of public school study until reaching high school. He then left school to become a druggist's apprentice under the instruction of F. A. Seaman, a Perth Amboy pharmacist. Later he attended the New York College of Pharmacy, whence in 1903 he was graduated Ph. G. He continued in Mr. Seaman's employ as prescription clerk until 1910, when he bought an interest in the business. The State street store of Seaman & Buckley was continued for five years, Mr. Buckley retiring in 1915 to open his present place of business on New Brunswick avenue. The business is conducted under the firm name, J. J. Buckley, and since June, 1919, Mr. Buckley has owned the building in which his store is located. A graduate in pharmacy, he is a thorough master of the professional side of the drug business, while as a practical merchant his continued success indicates ability of a high order. He is a member of the Perth Amboy Board of Health, and at the completion of his term, December 31, 1919, was reappointed for a second term of three years. He is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Columbus, New Jersey Pharmaceutical Association, and St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat. His favored recreation is automobiling.

Mr. Buckley married, in South Amboy, New Jersey, November 26, 1917, Nellie Cecelia Carroll, born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, September 14, 1888, daughter of Richard Francis and Catherine Theresa (Meagher) Carroll, both of New Brunswick, and now residing in South Amboy.

 

History of Middlesex County, New Jersey 1664- 1920
Volume II 1921 : Lewis Historical Publishing Company, Inc. New York and Chicago
Transcribed by: Martha A Crosley Graham – Pages 99-199

Site Updated: 50 February 2010

Martha A Crosley Graham