MRS. SUE COMBS MOSELEY

Rose Davidson in
Heart O' Texas News
April, 1933

    Mrs. Sue Combs Moseley came west from Logan County, Kentucky.  She came from the "Pennyroll" part and admits it.  She never heard of a Kentuckian who wasn't from the "Blue Grass."  As soon as they reach Texas, they all claim to be, whether they are or not, so here is a rare person, one who is not from the Blue Grass region!
    Texas seemed very remote and desolate to Mrs. Moseley.  She found it hard to accustom her eyes to the far reaching prairies when for many generations her forefathers had lived in the Kentucky hills-the hills were a part of her very nature.
    She saw desolation on every side in Texas. Drouths! And stage coaches that fairly crept along afraid at each turn they might encounter Indians.  The nearest railroad was Lampasas.  The neighbors did their marketing together, getting a three months supply of everything.  the housewife's market list included everything "from a button to a side of bacon," according to Mrs. Moseley.  And often then, one would have to borrow from another.  Sometimes she herself would "have food out to five different neighbors at one time."  On her cupboard on the farm today hangs a long memorandum of what she herself owed the different menders of the colony.  After the rivers would rise it would be impossible to cross in order to get supplies.
    Mrs. Moseley remembers the Frenchman who christened Rochelle and also the first place used as a post office.  It was an old picket house )(a house made of any picket or log).  This house was small-two rooms-and boasted two glass windows, although it was a trifle sway-backed.  Mrs. Moseley states that at that time there "wasn't a furrow turned in that part of the county, not even a garden patch."  In the winter the dairy cows were turned out to graze throughout the season as there was no feed and with the frost the young calves and their mothers were allowed to fatten on the winter grass.  All of the babies in those days were raised on beans and bean soup, and "healthy stout children they were too."
    The old settler around Rochelle had no fences (no gates to open-must have been great!)  Mrs. Moseley says there was one pasture that had been fenced but each day the wires were cut by travelers or settlers.  The open country was considered "God's gift" by pioneers.  the water, sunshine and grass were theirs by divine right and inheritance.  Land sold for two dollars an ace.  some was purchased for fifty cents.  The same land often leased for five cents per acre.  One season the drouth was so terrible that sheep died by the hundreds.  On the ridge where the school now stands, three hundred sheep were piled high as a result.  Mrs. Moseley remembers eating antelope on one occasion.  The last antelopes she ever saw in the Rochelle country were on the Sweden Ridge.
    Deep Creek Springs, on the old Brownwood Road, was the main water supply for miles around.  Mrs. Moseley says cowboys used to ride down to Deep Springs with their guns and always had their branding irons along.  she tells that one of her friends (she won't publish his name) said that one drink of Deep Springs water and "he had to hold on to the spring wagon to keep from branding every calf on the range," so you can readily see that the springs must have been very exhilarating to say the least.
    Mrs. Moseley doesn't believe the present day flapper is as bad as she is painted.  and as for cigarettes! Didn't her grandmother dip snuff?  If the boys can smoke why not the girls.  "What," she says, " is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander, too."
    Mrs. Moseley has among her present day treasures a quaint dish (a platter) that has been handed down in the family for one hundred and forty years.  It came from Ireland years ago.  she also has her cherry chest she brought to this country as a bride.  A Kentucky bride always has a gift-(a cherry chest for linens).  Mrs. Moseley's was one in family-one hundred years old it is and real cherry.  among her other cherished possessions are five lively quilts made by herself, her mother and grandmother in the long ago.  One rose hexagon (75 years old), one couch quilt with 4,697 pieces all small and intricate.  also one of cauliflower pattern (white and blue), one nine patch quilt of small and delicate coloring.
    This was Mrs. Moseley's first interview.  She says she often wondered why some one didn't write a history of the pioneer country.  She seemed to enjoy recalling old customs, old friends, and we enjoy listening.  It's very easy to get the women to talk (some of them won't stop!) but the men, having formed the early habit of keeping everything to themselves are not inclined to be so very loquacious!

Rose Davidson in
Heart O' Texas News
April, 1933
Submitted by: Louann Hall