JOHN SHOCKEY

Rose Davidson
Heart O' Texas News
30 April 1931

    Like the vanishing herd, the typical cowboy has almost disappeared.  John is typical they haven't anything this side of Medicine Bow that can ride wild horses like John could in the days when men were men and women were-taboo!  They still are as far as John is concerned; he has remained a bachelor all these years.  The more he sees of horses the better he likes them.
    Even the wild ones can be corralled (I'm still speaking of horses).  John doesn't give his age, says he isn't good at dates.  Tells me he worked for Rufe Carroll and Bill White on the Ford ranch in the early days.  Will Strickland was boss at that time and "just as good a boss as ever was."  He remembers how they first worked steers, John farmed on what is now the Comfort ranch.  The oxen were hard to manage, the heat was terrible but that was [art of it.  One day he was out with Mr. Strickland, saw a bunch of antelope, "recon there must have been a hundred of 'em in the bunch.  Young ones, too.  bound to be somebody after 'em!"  John finally succeeded in roping one, they came so close.  They took it to the ranch but Mrs. Strickland objected to keeping it away from its wild life so the antelope was turned loose and after that no more antelope in droves were ever seen.  They left the pastures, drifted further west-vanished like the buffalo.  Lots of wolves then-three kinds, the coyote, gray wolf "and them hobos" (lobos).  They would attack a sheep, tear its throat, leave what they could not devour.
    There were a great many "rattlers" in the pastures.  They sometimes bit the cattle.  John likes best of all to recall the old days around the camp fire, turkey, deer and camp cooking!  Cowboy songs, cowboy life-Whoopee- "them wuz the good old days," John!

Rose Davidson
Heart O' Texas News
30 April 1931
Submitted by: Louann Hall